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Session

Evaluating Digital Work for Tenure and Promotion: A Workshop for Evaluators and Candidates

Thursday, 8:30–11:30 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Programs and the MLA Office of Research. Presiding: Alison Byerly, Middlebury Coll.; Katherine A. Rowe, Bryn Mawr Coll.; Susan Schreibman, Trinity Coll. Dublin; Victoria E. Szabo, Duke Univ.

The workshop will provide materials and facilitated discussion about evaluating work in digital media (e.g., scholarly editions, databases, digital mapping projects, born-digital creative or scholarly work). Designed for both creators of digital materials (candidates for tenure and promotion) and administrators or colleagues who evaluate those materials, the workshop will propose strategies for documenting, presenting, and evaluating such work. Preregistration required.

A Nonteaching Academic Job Search

Thursday, 8:30–11:30 a.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Brenda Bethman, Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City; Shaun Longstreet, Marquette Univ.; Lisa Roetzel, Univ. of California, Irvine

This highly interactive workshop provides concrete and immediate assistance for participants who want to be better prepared to land a job that is both fulfilling and full-time. We will stress ways in which participants can work to ensure that their PhD training prepares them for a broader range of jobs, providing concrete advice on how graduates can make themselves marketable for academic administrative positions without increasing their time to degree. Preregistration required.

Strategies for Search Committees in Foreign Languages

Thursday, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m., 206, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Jane Hacking, Univ. of Utah

Speakers: Jane Hacking; Ann Marie Rasmussen, Duke Univ.

How to conduct a successful search: the questions to ask, the signs to observe, and the questions to expect. A discussion on the best practices for all searches and recruitment procedures. Representatives of search committees in English are welcome.

Preconvention Workshop for Job Seekers in Foreign Languages

Thursday, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m., 2A, WSCC

Program arranged by the ADFL Executive Committee. Presiding: Nelly Furman, MLA

Speakers: Takako Aikawa, Microsoft Corp.; Chris Brockett, Microsoft Corp.; Cathy L. Jrade, Vanderbilt Univ.; Mari Noda, Ohio State Univ., Columbus; Timothy Jon Scheie, Univ. of Rochester; Luiz Fernando Valente, Brown Univ.

Representatives of different types of institutions describe work and career paths in BA-, MA-, and PhD-granting programs. Speakers will address aspects of the job search: the application dossier, interviews at the convention and on campus, waiting out a sluggish market, and negotiating an offer.

Preconvention Workshop for Job Seekers in English

Thursday, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m., 2B, WSCC

Program arranged by the ADE Executive Committee. Presiding: Thomas Hurley, Diablo Valley Coll., CA

Speakers: Kevin J. H. Dettmar, Pomona Coll.; Donald E. Hall, Lehigh Univ.; Thomas Hurley; Maureen T. Reddy, Rhode Island Coll.

Representatives of two-year, baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral English departments will describe work and career paths in their institutions. Aspects of the job search, including letters of application and recommendation, curriculum vitae, interviews at the convention and on campus, waiting out a sluggish market, and negotiating an offer will be discussed.

Inter-nature-nality: International Perspectives on Environment

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. Presiding: Rosario Michelle Ramirez Matabuena, Florida State Univ.

1. "Noisom Stinks: Aphra Behn's Explorations of Paradise," Justine McGhee, Univ. of Rochester

2. "Catastrophe, Internationality, and the Environmental Divide," Bishupal Limbu, Portland State Univ.

3. "'Dígar na áb ast ín' ('It is not water that flows'): A Comparative Ecocritical Analysis of the Poetry of Fereydoon Moshiri and Simon J. Ortiz," Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez, Bradley Univ.; Fada Mahmoudi, Bahá'í Inst. for Higher Education

Conrad's A Personal Record and 'Twixt Land and Sea at One Hundred

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Joseph Conrad Society of America. Presiding: John G. Peters, Univ. of North Texas

1. "More on the Art of Lying: Politics in A Personal Record and Conrad's Other Autobiographical Works," Richard Jeffrey Ruppel, Chapman Univ.

2. "Turgenev's Superior Homo Duplex: 'Into' 'The Secret Sharer' and 'A Smile of Fortune' and 'out of' A Personal Record," Chris Cairney, Middle Georgia Coll.

3. "'Not Bleeding, Singing': The Operatic Legacy of 'Twixt Land and Sea," Mark Deggan, Univ. of British Columbia

Teaching the Bible as Literature

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lawrence Besserman, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Speakers: Denise Handlarski, York Univ., Keele; Kathleen F. Lundeen, Western Washington Univ.; Dale F. Salwak, Citrus Coll., CA; Gillian D. Steinberg, Yeshiva Univ., NY; Theodore L. Steinberg, State Univ. of New York, Fredonia; Wendolyn Weber, Metropolitan State Coll. of Denver

Courses on the Bible as literature are offered in many English and general literature departments. The pedagogical aim of this roundtable is to assist teachers of such courses in thinking through what they do, or could be doing, when they teach the Bible. How can we improve what we do when we teach the Bible as/and/in literature?

Large Digital Libraries: Beyond Google Books

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Michael Hancher, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Speakers: Tanya E. Clement, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Amanda L. French, George Mason Univ.; George Oates, Open Library; Glenn Roe, Univ. of Chicago; Andrew M. Stauffer, Univ. of Virginia; Jeremy York, HathiTrust Digital Library

Aside from Google Books, the two principal repositories for digitized books are Open Library and HathiTrust Digital Library; Digital Public Library of America is now in its planning stage. What are the merits and prospects of these three projects? How can they be improved? What role should scholars play in their improvement? These questions will be addressed by participants in each project and by others experienced in the digital humanities.

For a prospectus, visit mh.cla.umn.edu/MLA2012.pdf.

Rag, Letter, Post: Material Communications Networks in Colonial and Early National America

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on American Literature to 1800. Presiding: Trish Loughran, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Paper Nationalism," Jonathan Senchyne, Cornell Univ.

2. "Posting Logan: Jefferson's Appendix to Notes on the State of Virginia," Mark Mattes, Univ. of Iowa

3. "Revolutionary Correspondences," Russ Castronovo, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Respondent: Trish Loughran

The Theatricality of Samson Agonistes

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 607, WSCC

Program arranged by the Milton Society of America. Presiding: Rachel J. Trubowitz, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

1. "Ancients and Moderns: The Theatricality of Samson Agonistes," Ann Baynes Coiro, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "Samson Agonistes, Baroque Theater, and Aristotelian Tragedy in Performance," Russ Leo, Princeton Univ.

3. "Milton and the Drama of Interiority: A Theater Within," James Carson Nohrnberg, Univ. of Virginia

Respondent: Blair G. Hoxby, Stanford Univ.

Transmedia Stories and Literary Games

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session

1. "Hundred Thousand Billion Fingers: Oulipian Games and Serial Players," Patrick LeMieux, Duke Univ.

2. "Make Love, Not Warcraft: Virtual Worlds and Utopia," Stephanie Boluk, Vassar Coll.

3. "Oscillation: Transmedia Storytelling and Narrative Theory by Design," Patrick Jagoda, Univ. of Chicago

Respondent: Victoria E. Szabo, Duke Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.stephanieboluk.com/docs/MLA_2012_abstracts.pdf.

An African Literary Classic in Ten World Translations

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: David Chioni Moore, Macalester Coll.

Speakers: Ana Paula Ferreira, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Ursula Lindqvist, Harvard Univ.; Ben Vu Tran, Vanderbilt Univ.; Kennedy Waliaula, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

This roundtable examines the classic 1956 francophone Cameroonian novel Une vie de boy (or Houseboy) in its ten translations, 1958–98: Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, English, German, Portuguese, Slovenian, Swahili, Swedish, and Vietnamese. Charged concepts and referents (e.g., nègre, le boy, sjambok, péril jaune), rarely translated words (shorts, jeep, khaki), target-language contexts and politics, and more will be examined in major and less-taught languages.

Early Modern Disabled Bodies and Cultural Discourses

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Shakespeare and the Division on Disability Studies. Presiding: Encarnación Juárez-Almendros, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "The Ugly Truth: Thersites and the Satire of the Poetomachia," Jeffrey Wilson, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "Disabling Paradise Lost: Enforced Normalcy and Miltonic Accommodation," Allison Hobgood, Willamette Univ.

3. "Bodies out of Balance: The 'Undulating Object,’ Corporal Fragility, and Disability in Montaigne’s Essais and Cervantes’s Prologues," Alani Hicks-Bartlett, Univ. of California, Berkeley

For abstracts, visit disabilityforum.nd.edu/.

Useful Fictions? A Cognitive Perspective on the Utility of Emotions, Imagination, and Long Novels

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lisa Zunshine, Univ. of Kentucky

1. "Falling in Love Unnoticed: Emotional Structures and Literary Analysis," Patrick Colm Hogan, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

2. "Cognition, Dreaming, and the Literary Imagination," Alan Richardson, Boston Coll.

3. "Do We Want to Use Cognitive Science to Make a Case for Teaching Literature?" Lisa Zunshine

For abstracts and background materials, write to lisa.zunshine@gmail.com.

Beyond the Colonial Gaze: Photorealism and Photojournalism in India, 1870–1930

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Deborah Hutton, Coll. of New Jersey

1. "'To Capture a Picture': The Novel and Photographic Realism in Late-Nineteenth-Century North India," Jennifer Dubrow, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "The Interplay of Journalism, Realism, and Artistry in the Photography of Lala Deen Dayal," Deborah Hutton

3. "Emergent Photographic Genres and the News: Snapshot Photography, Film, and the Illustrated Photo Book," Sudhir Mahadevan, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

For abstracts, visit https://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/jdubrow/21184/ after 5 Dec.

Fernando Vallejo's Poetics of Transgression

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Aníbal González-Pérez, Yale Univ.

1. "Turn of the Century around Two Discomforted Colombians: Narratives of Opposition in Vallejo and Vargas Vila," Juan C. Gonzalez-Espitia, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Posing as a Critique of Modernity in Fernando Vallejo," Juanita Aristizabal, Catholic Univ. of America

3. "Fernando Vallejo's Mauditisme as Melodramatic Spectacle," Héctor Hoyos, Stanford Univ.

4. "Anticlerical Discourse in Fernando Vallejo; or, How to Narrate without Religion," Aníbal González-Pérez

Betrayal: The Individual and the State

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Ruth Kluger, Univ. of California, Irvine

1. "Robert Schindel's Play Dunkelstein and the Judenrat in Vienna," Ruth Kluger

2. "Gerron Gives a Film to the Nazis: The Literary History of a Propaganda Movie," Martin Modlinger, Univ. of Cambridge

3. "Betrayal in Herta Müller's Life and Works," Anca Luca Holden, Mount Holyoke Coll.

4. "Ethical Betrayal in The Lives of Others," Lucas Harriman, Univ. of Miami

For abstracts, write to aholden@mtholyoke.edu after 20 Dec.

Postnationalism: Comparative Theories and Practices

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: J. Gerald Kennedy, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

Speakers: Henri-Simon Blanc-Hoang, Defense Language Inst.; Adolfo Campoy-Cubillo, Oakland Univ.; Kevin Thomas Concannon, Texas A&M Univ., Corpus Christi; Claudia Hoffmann, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Alpana Sharma, Wright State Univ.

Respondent: Pedro Garcia-Caro, Univ. of Oregon

National discourses are challenged across different continents and diverse cultural and linguistic traditions. Some of the fundamental questions this roundtable will address are, What comes after the nation? Who benefits from a postnational culture? Are there cultures or traditions where (post)nationalism is more readily adopted? Why? What is the role of language and literary teaching in a postnationalist context?

Public Discourse, Islamism, and the Arab Revolutions: On Paul Berman's The Flight of the Intellectuals (session canceled)

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Gabriel Noah Brahm, Northern Michigan Univ.

1. "Fire in Cairo: Paul Berman and What I Saw in Tahrir Square," Gabriel Noah Brahm

2. "The Flight of French Intellectuals: The Contemporary Debate on Anti-Semitism," Bruno Chaouat, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

3. "Why Kurdistan Needs to Take Note of Paul Berman’s Latest Book, The Flight of the Intellectuals, and So Does the Rest of the World," Sabah Salih, Bloomington Univ.

4. "Flight Cancellations: A Reply to My Critics and My Critics' Critics," Paul Berman, New York Univ.

For papers, write to gbrahm@nmu.edu.

Globalization, Latinidad, Chicano/a Literature

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Frances R. Aparicio, Northwestern Univ.

1. "Premodern Style: How Neoliberalism Rewrites Cultural Nationalism on Latino Bodies," Kristy L. Ulibarri, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

2. "Literatura Tranfronteriza: Mexicana Novel Encounters," Norma Elia Cantú, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio

3. "Latinidad and New Mexico: Performing Home, Belonging, and Identity," Lillian Gorman, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

For abstracts, write to frances-aparicio@northwestern.edu.

American Poetry in the 1890s: Culture, Convention, Canons

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Elissa Zellinger, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Noguchi and the Purple Cow: 'Placing' Poetry in the 1890s," Angela Franceska Sorby, Marquette Univ.

2. "The Aesthetics of Dialect: Regionalism, Balladry, and the Book Trade," Michael Cohen, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "'According to the Best Legends': Crane, Robinson, and Chivalry," Elissa Zellinger

Shaw in the 1930s: Drama and Dictatorial Politics

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lawrence Switzky, Univ. of Toronto, Mississauga

1. "Politics, Allegory, and Mortality in On the Rocks," Charles J. Del Dotto, Duke Univ.

2. "Exotic Fable or Stalinist Allegory? Taking Another Look at Shaw's The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles," Matthew Yde, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "Shaw's Subjunctive: The Dramaturgy of Extravaganza and the Extremities of Political Imagination," David Kornhaber, Univ. of Texas, Austin

For abstracts, write to lawrence.switzky@utoronto.ca.

Archipelagic American Discourses: Decontinentalizing American Studies

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Ifeoma C. K. Nwankwo, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "Archipelagic American Studies: Leaving the Continent and the Robinsonade," Brian Roberts, Brigham Young Univ., UT

2. "Americanidad and Monte Puebla," Matthew P. Guterl, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "Black Orpheus and an Archipelagic Perspective on New World Blackness," Michelle Ann Stephens, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

4. "Donald Trump, Venus Raj, and the Filipino Labor Diaspora," Allan Isaac, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

For abstracts, write to brianrussellroberts@byu.edu.

Material Worlds

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry and Prose. Presiding: Nieves Romero-Diaz, Mount Holyoke Coll.

1. "Material and Verbal Worlds: Cognition and Reading in Don Quijote," Barbara Simerka, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "The 1599 Lazarillo and the Cultural and Textual History of Lazarillo de Tormes," Felipe Ruan, Brock Univ.

3. "Narrative Culture and the Printing Press," Ignacio E. Navarrete, Univ. of California, Berkeley

The Memoir Boom

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing. Presiding: Linda Haverty Rugg, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "'Publishers, Stop Spending Your Millions on This Tripe': The Memoir Boom and Its Backlash," Julie Rak, Univ. of Alberta

2. "Memoirs: Booming in the Academy," Kathleen McCormack, Florida International Univ.

3. "Memoir Bytes: Six-Word Memoir, Cyberspace, and the Life-Writing Boom," Laurie McNeill, Univ. of British Columbia

4. "Known Unknowns: Family Secrets and State Secrets," Molly Pulda, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

For abstracts, write to rugg@berkeley.edu.

Literature and Photography

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Other Arts. Presiding: Eduardo Lujan Cadava, Princeton Univ.

1. "To Occupy the Same Space: Photography and the Novel," Stuart Burrows, Brown Univ.

2. "Revolution Is a Girl's Game: Snapshots of the Mexican Armed Struggle," Paola L. Cortes-Rocca, San Francisco State Univ.

3. "Roland Barthes, Virginia Woolf, and Alfredo Jaar on Writing Atrocity Photographs," Alexandra Neel, Loyola Marymount Univ.

What Is the Future of French in French Studies?

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Conseil International d'Études Francophones. Presiding: Claire Keith, Marist Coll.

1. "Language versus Lingua Franca: The Case for French Studies," Claire Keith

2. "Rethinking French Studies: Toward a Strategy of Recovery," Rose Marie Kuhn, California State Univ., Fresno

3. "Toward a Global Francophone Research: Limits and Perspectives," Eloise Brezault, New York Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.cief.org.

Alexander Pope!

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Catherine Elizabeth Ingrassia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.; George L. Justice, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

Speakers: Amy L. Friedman, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Ileana Popa Baird, Univ. of Virginia; John J. Richetti, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Rivka Swenson, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.; Claude Willan, Stanford Univ.

Five-minute statements: manifestos, interrogations, critiques, or subversions of Pope. Revisionary approaches for a discussion-based session that probes the limits and possibilities of twenty-first-century Pope scholarship.

Crisis and the US Political Imaginary: Tremblement de Terre and Terror Wars

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 617, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Sheila Marie Contreras, Michigan State Univ.

1. "American Muslim Plots: John Updike's Terrorist and the US National Security Crisis," Salah D. Hassan, Michigan State Univ.

2. "Crisis Colonialism: Haiti in Shock and the Historical Event," Kathleen Mary Kane, Univ. of Montana

3. "The Shock-Doctrine Approach to Establishing 'Civility' in the American University," Cynthia Franklin, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

Colonial Violence, Indigenous Feminisms, and Sovereignty

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 612, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Janis A. Johnson, Univ. of Idaho

Speakers: Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech Univ.; Inés Hernández-Ávila, Univ. of California, Davis; Christina A. Roberts, Seattle Univ.; Leah Sneider, New Mexico Highlands Univ.; Erin Wedehase, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

We consider the ways Indigenous women writers articulate the epidemic of patriarchal colonial violence and femicide Native women experience. How do these writers imagine decolonization and healing? These literatures have a direct correlation to Native communities and to readers who may not appreciate the complexities of Native life and struggles for survival.

For abstracts, write to janjohn@uidaho.edu.

Slave Emancipation and Projects of Citizenship

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Presiding: Ana M. Hontanilla, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

1. "Royal Slaves and Favorite Sons: Accounting for Freedom in the Late-Eighteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean," Karen A. Stolley, Emory Univ.

2. "Performing Haiti: Racial Revolution and Neoliberal Spectatorship," Peter Reed, Univ. of Mississippi

3. "Slaves to Liberalism: Spain, 1868," Lisa Surwillo, Stanford Univ.

4. "Slave Emancipation and the Alternative Modernity of Early French Socialism," Naomi Andrews, Santa Clara Univ.

Cetacean Nations: Thinking Transversely

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Michael Lundblad, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins

1. "Beauty and the Enchanted Beast: The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) in the Canadian Cultural Landscape," Marie-France Boissonneault, Univ. of Guelph

2. "Empathetic Imagination in Liu Ka-Shiang's He-lian-mo-mo the Hunchback," Sun-chieh Liang, National Taiwan Normal Univ.

3. "Becoming-Whale: Biopolitics in Liao Hong-Ji's A Whale of an Animal, The Book of Whales and Dolphins, and The Ocean Patroller," Robin Chen-Hsing Tsai, Tamkang Univ.

For papers, visit mail.tku.edu.tw/rnchtsai/.

The Future of Peer Review

Thursday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sean Scanlan, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York

1. "Making Online Peer Review Interactive: Sticky Notes and Highlighters," Cheryl E. Ball, Illinois State Univ.

2. "The Bearable Light of Openness: Renovating Obsolete Peer-Review Bottlenecks," Aaron J. Barlow, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York

3. "The Law Review Approach: What the Humanities Can Learn," Allen Mendenhall, Auburn Univ., Auburn

Climate Change and the Limits of Representation: Literary History in the Anthropocene

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Tobias Coyote Menely, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Mapping Climate Change: The British, the French, and the Old Northwest," Robert Markley, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "Romantic Haze," Tobias Coyote Menely

3. "Climatic Darkness and Romantic Formalism," Bo Earle, Univ. of British Columbia

The Tragic and the Heroic: Phases in a Modern Affair

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Patrizia C. McBride, Cornell Univ.

1. "No Time for Heroes: The Tragic in Enlightened Poetics," Orsolya Kiss, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "Heroic Doubles: The Stability of Male Relationships in the German Cultural Imagination," Alina Dana Weber, Florida State Univ.

3. "Achilles Redux: Robert Musil Tailors the Heroic to Modernity and Vice Versa," Todd Cesaratto, Miami Univ., Oxford

Respondent: Johannes Türk, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

Animals, Vegetables, Minerals

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Douglas Trevor, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1. "Mineral Terminologies in Jonson's The Alchemist," Suparna Roychoudhury, Harvard Univ.

2. "'Serpents Envious': Creaturely Yearning and Mere Life in Holy Sonnet 9," Blaine Greteman, Univ. of Iowa

3. "Raptor," Linda K. Gregerson, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

For abstracts, write to dtrevor@umich.edu.

Everything and More: Theorizing the Encyclopedic Novel

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Brendan Beirne, New York Univ.

1. "Renaissance Readers Required?" Tobias J. Meinel, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2. "Ecology, World Literature, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead," Lee Konstantinou, Stanford Univ.

3. "Encyclopedic Space and the Ordnance Survey in Ulysses," Cóilín Parsons, Univ. of Cape Town

Where New European Literature Begins . . .

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sibylle Baumbach, Univ. of Mainz

1. "The Border Condition of/in European Literature," Søren Frank, Univ. of Southern Denmark

2. "Anthologies of European Identity: A Case Study of Textual Coproduction," César Pablo Domínguez-Prieto, Univ. of Santiago de Compostela

3. "Bibliomigrancy: Goethe, Macaulay, and Comparative European Literary Histories," Bala Venkat Mani, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

For abstracts and further information, write to baumbach@uni-mainz.de.

Using Foucault

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Interdisciplinary Approaches to Culture and Society. Presiding: Lynne Huffer, Emory Univ.

1. "Eros, Ecstasy, and the Limits of Foucault," William Junker, Univ. of Chicago

2. "The Archaeology of Biopower: From Plants to Animals in The Order of Things," Jeffrey T. Nealon, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Inhuman Reproductions: Foucault and Feminist Philosophies of Matter," Rebekah Sheldon, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

4. "Foucault the Rhetorician: Postcolonial Discourse and The History of Sexuality," Jiyoung Ryu, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

Social Networks, Jewish Identity, and New Media

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Jewish Cultural Studies. Presiding: Jonathan S. Skolnik, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

1. "Social Networking, Jewish Identity, and New Jewish Ritual: Tattooed Jews on Facebook," Erika Meitner, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

2. "Electronic Apikoros: Searching for the Nineteenth-Century Origins of Contemporary Satire in the Jewish Blogosphere," Ashley Aronsen Passmore, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

3. "From MySpace to MyJewishSpace: The Role of the Internet in the Self-Definition of New Jews in Austria and Germany," Andrea Reiter, Univ. of Southampton

Morris's Artistic Descendants: Women Writers, Artists, and Designers

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the William Morris Society. Presiding: Kathleen O. Sims, Manchester, NH

1. "Staging Morris: Anne Charlotte Leffler's 'How to Do Good' and Morris's Critique of Philanthropy," Lynn R. Wilkinson, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "Politicizing the Arts and Crafts Movement: Mary De Morgan's 'Bread of Discontent,'" Heidi Pierce, East Tennessee State Univ.

3. "Symmetry and Symbolism in the Embroidery Designs of May Morris," Christen Elaine Ericsson, Univ. of Southampton

For abstracts, visit www.morrissociety.org after 1 Dec.

Making a Case for the Humanities: Advocacy and Audience

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Delegate Assembly Organizing Committee. Presiding: Teresa Mangum, Univ. of Iowa

Speakers: Barbara McFadden Allen, Committee on Institutional Cooperation; Bruce Burgett, Univ. of Washington, Bothell; Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed; Susan E. Jeffords, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Esther Mackintosh, Federation of State Humanities Councils

Administrators, funding agencies, legislators, taxpayers, donors, parents, students, and colleagues in science, business, engineering, and medicine: how can we address these diverse audiences on their terms? Given these groups' priorities and obligations, what compelling reasons can we offer that it is in their interest to become advocates for the study of literature and languages? Our distinguished panelists share insight, advice, and experiences.

Pinter's Voice

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Harold Pinter Society. Presiding: Judith A. Roof, Rice Univ.

1. "Ruth: Harold Pinter's Voice of Postmodernist Politics," Saumya Rajan, Univ. of Allahabad

2. "What Dyou Mean? The Cockney Voice in Harold Pinter's The Dumb Waiter," William Crooke, East Tennessee State Univ.

3. "Pinter's Voices," Susan Hollis Merritt, Pinter Review

Spenser, Donne, and the Work of Poetry

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Spenser Society and the John Donne Society. Presiding: Sean H. McDowell, Seattle Univ.

Speakers: Judith H. Anderson, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Theresa Maria DiPasquale, Whitman Coll.; Heather Dubrow, Fordham Univ.; Anne Lake Prescott, Barnard Coll.; Melissa E. Sanchez, Univ. of Pennsylvania

A conversation about the poetic relations between Edmund Spenser and John Donne. The focus will be on comparing the poets' attitudes toward the work of poetic making and the shaping of poetic fictions to structure knowledge, perception, and experience; their transformations of inherited poetic genres and poetic traditions; and their understanding of the moral or reformative work of poetry.

Ezra Pound and James Joyce: Connections and Disconnections

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Ezra Pound Society and the International James Joyce Foundation. Presiding: Anne C. Fogarty, University Coll. Dublin

1. "Intertextuality in Hugh Selwyn Mauberley and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man," Aaron Percich, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

2. "‘Odysseus / the Name of My Family’: Pound, Joyce, Homer," Leah Culligan-Flack, Marquette Univ.

3. "‘[It] Must Be Difficult’: Joyce’s Homer and Ezra Pound's Elusive Allusiveness," Demetres Tryphonopoulos, Univ. of New Brunswick

4. "Pound and Joyce: Biographical, Critical, and Stylistic Intersections," Timothy Paul Redman, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

For abstracts, write to demetres@unb.ca.

Old Books and New Tools

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Sarah Werner, Folger Shakespeare Library

Speakers: Katherine D. Harris, San José State Univ.; Jeffrey Knight, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Matt Thomas, Univ. of Iowa; Whitney Trettien, Duke Univ.; Meg Worley, Palo Alto, CA

This roundtable will consider how the categories of old books and new tools might illuminate each other. Speakers will provide individual reflections on their experiences with old books and new tools before opening up the conversation to the theoretical and practical concerns driving the use and interactions of the two.

Filling the Gaps: The Future of Keywords for Children's Literature

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Philip Nel, Kansas State Univ.; Lissa Paul, Brock Univ.

1. "Fairy Tale," Jack D. Zipes, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "Genre," Karin E. Westman, Kansas State Univ.

3. "Family," Kelly Hager, Simmons Coll.; Talia C. Schaffer, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York

Why Habermas Matters Now

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Nicholas Hengen, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

1. "Habermas, Luhmann, and the History of Reading," Christina Lupton, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. "Habermas and Young: Literature and Human Rights," Nicholas Hengen

3. "The New Negro and the Creation of an International Black Public Sphere," Delphine Gras, Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Respondent: Amanda S. Anderson, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

For abstracts, write to hengen@umn.edu after 1 Dec.

Writing Lives, Living Lives in French: Camille Delaville, Nathalie Sarraute, and Marjane Satrapi

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: E. Nicole Meyer, Univ. of Wisconsin, Green Bay

1. "Fractured Childhood, Jewish Identity, and Other Silences in Nathalie Sarraute," E. Nicole Meyer

2. "Exile and Ethics: (En)Gendering Cosmopolitan Conversation in Marjane Satrapi's Broderies," S. Olivia Donaldson, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

For abstracts, write to meyern@uwgb.edu.

The American Transcendentalists as Continental Philosophers

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Roger Bellin, Tulane Univ.

1. "Magical Life: Thoreau and Benjamin on Nature in Mourning," Branka Arsic, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York

2. "Emerson, Blanchot, and the Wildness of Friendship," Eduardo Lujan Cadava, Princeton Univ.

3. "Negative Dialectics: The Transcendentalists, Adorno, and Utopian Philosophy," Clemens Spahr, Univ. of Mainz

4. "Pestalozzi, Alcott, Rancière: Pedagogy and Emancipation," Roger Bellin

Post-Operaismo, Techne, and the Common

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robert A. Wilkie, Univ. of Wisconsin, La Crosse

1. "Biotechnical Ecologies: Common Life in Los Angeles," Allison Schifani, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

2. "Cyber Communism: Left Ethics and Right Theory," Stephen C. Tumino, Kingsborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

3. "Copyleft as Training Ground: The Digital Horizons of Intellectual Property," Zachary Zimmer, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

4. "The Romance of Techne," Kimberly DeFazio, Univ. of Wisconsin, La Crosse

Death and/of the Author: Posthumous Publication

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Augusta Rohrbach, Washington State Univ., Pullman

1. "Posthumous Authorship and Poetry Editing in Nineteenth-Century America," Melissa K. White, Univ. of Virginia

2. "Reanimating the Corpse: R. M. Bird's Sheppard Lee and the Problems of Posthumous Publication," Sari Altschuler, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

3. "Textual Identity, Textual Amnesia: The Author as Fluid Text and the Editing of Billy Budd," John Bryant, Hofstra Univ.

Theme of Humor in the Comedia of Early Modern Spanish Drama

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Drama. Presiding: Baltasar Fra-Molinero, Bates Coll.

1. "Peasants in the Palace: Agustín Moreto's La fuerza del natural and the Mockery of Courtly Practices," Alejandro García-Reidy, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona

2. "Grace and the Gracioso: Forms of Parody in the Comedia de Santos," Sonia Velázquez, Princeton Univ.

3. "El humor en el teatro breve anónimo en prosa de fin de siglo XVI en los inicios de la comedia nueva: Modelos, fuentes e influencias," Vicente Pérez de León, Univ. of Melbourne

Reflections on Mexico

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Mexican Cultural and Literary Studies. Presiding: Maria-Socorro Tabuenca, Univ. of Texas, El Paso

1. "Visualizing Public Education in 1940s Mexico: Hannes Meyer's Photographic Archive," Ryan Fred Long, Univ. of Oklahoma

2. "My Eyes, These Tears, This Camera, the Rain: Photopoetics at Tlatelolco," Samuel Steinberg, Trinity Coll., CT

3. "Masks of Modernity: Cine de Luchadores and the Superheroic Nonface of the Mexican Miracle," Jungwon Park, Univ. of Northern Colorado; Rafael Ponce-Cordero, Central Michigan Univ.

African Studies / Postcolonial Studies: A Match (Un)Made in Academia

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Postcolonial Studies in Literature and Culture. Presiding: Anjali Prabhu, Wellesley Coll.

1. "African Studies: Postcolonial Studies by Another Name?" Kwaku L. Korang, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "Has Africa Ever Been Postcolonial?" Nicholas Mainey Brown, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

3. "Disciplinary Intimacies: Postcolonialism and African Studies," Taiwo Adetunji Osinubi, Université de Montréal

4. "The Place of Africa, in Theory: From Pan-Africanism to Postcolonialism," Shaden M. Tageldin, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Respondent: Simon E. Gikandi, Princeton Univ.

Adaptation and Refraction in East Asia to 1900

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures to 1900. Presiding: Joseph Sorensen, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "The Adaptation and Re-Creation of The Romance of the Three Kingdoms in Japanese Puppet Theater," Kai Xie, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Women Outlaws of the Marsh: Takizawa Bakin's Transgendering Adaptation of The Water Margin," Mari Nagase, Augustana Coll.

3. "Subjugation of the Demonic Woman and Qu You's The Peony Lantern: From Ningbo Literati to Arakida Reijo," Fumiko Joo, Univ. of Chicago

4. "The Peony Lantern: From Chinese Literati Narrative to B Movie," Paul Rouzer, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

For abstracts, write to jsorensen@ucdavis.edu.

Biopolitics of Performance

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Drama. Presiding: Tavia Nyong'o, New York Univ.

1. "The Roots of Oedipus in King Lear," Vin Nardizzi, Univ. of British Columbia

2. "Toxic and Illegible Bodies in Cherríe Moraga's Heroes and Saints," Yanoula Athanassakis, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "Suffering in Motion: The Role of the Train in Film Documentary Migrant Melodrama," Ana Puga, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Against Orthodoxy

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Arabic Literature and Culture. Presiding: Ibtissam Bouachrine, Smith Coll.

"Against Orthodoxy," Anouar Majid, Univ. of New England

Assessing Assessment(s)?

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Literature. Presiding: Jeanne A. Follansbee, Harvard Univ.

Speakers: Reed Way Dasenbrock, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa; Donna Heiland, Teagle Foundation; John M. Ulrich, Mansfield Univ.; Eve Marie Wiederhold, George Mason Univ.

Public interest in the cash value of a liberal arts education has prompted colleges and universities to reevaluate what we teach and what students learn. Responding to calls for accountability has been challenging for English departments, which use nonquantitative measures to assess student achievement. This roundtable will consider assessment in literature courses, emphasizing practices as well as the politics of assessment within institutions.

The Book and the Body in Medieval Iberia

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Presiding: Jean Dangler, Tulane Univ.

1. "Ha imagen que vyu da virgin: Watery Transformations and Maria's Praesentia in the Cantigas de Santa María of Alfonso X," Marla I. Pagan-Mattos, Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Destroying Discourse and Constructing Masculinity in the Arcipreste de Talavera," Shaun Bauer, Univ. of Central Florida

3. "Morisco Manuscripts and Cultural Heritage in Modern Spain," Heather Bamford, Texas State Univ., San Marcos

C'era una volta: New Directions in Italian Fairy Tales Studies

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association for Italian Studies. Presiding: Suzanne Marie Magnanini, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

1. "Fays in Moderata Fonte's Floridoro: Adoption and Abandonment," Julia Marie Kisacky, Baylor Univ.

2. "Capuana's Fairy Tales: Fantasies in Verismo," Jonathan Hiller, Adelphi Univ.

3. "Vittorio De Sica's Uncanny Fairy Tale in Miracolo a Milano," Bernardo Piciché, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

For abstracts, write to Suzanne.Magnanini@colorado.edu.

Reading Robert Duncan Reading: The H.D. Book

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry. Presiding: Michael Davidson, Univ. of California, San Diego; Peter Quartermain, Univ. of British Columbia

1. "The Eros of Reading: Duncan’s H.D. Book," Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

2. "'[T]owards the Light of What I Do Not Yet Know': The Adventure of Process in Robert Duncan's H.D. Book," James Maynard, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

3. "'Gay Shame' and The H.D. Book," Kevin Killian, San Francisco, CA

Cinema, Politics, Theory

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Film. Presiding: Nora M. Alter, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Paul D. Young, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "In Defense of Grand Claims in Film Politics and Theory," Christopher Pavsek, Simon Fraser Univ.

2. "'I'm Interested in Cinema': Abbas Kiarostami's Spectator Cinephiles," Sara Saljoughi, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

3. "Evental Genres: Science Fiction, Love, and Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker," Phillip Edward Wegner, Univ. of Florida

After the Heath: Teaching US Multilingual Literature

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Literature of the United States in Languages Other Than English. Presiding: Sandra L. Dahlberg, Univ. of Houston, Downtown

Speakers: Mary Pat Brady, Cornell Univ.; Angela Calcaterra, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Robert Jarrett, Univ. of Houston, Downtown; Alison Tracy Hale, Univ. of Puget Sound; Jennie Wang, Providence Univ.; Sandra Abelson Zagarell, Oberlin Coll.

Respondent: Paul Lauter, Trinity Coll., CT

This roundtable explores the pedagogical and critical impact of the Heath Anthology on multilingual literatures of the United States. The roundtable will address the increased visibility of non-English US literatures, ways the Heath altered pedagogical practices, traditionally trained teachers' use of the Heath's non-English materials, non-English texts, and notions of Americanness in the classroom and in criticism.

Early Modern Knowledge Transfer

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Society for German Renaissance and Baroque Literature. Presiding: Patrick Brugh, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "Translating History, Shaping Nation: Nationalism, Humanism, Vernacular, and the Printing Press," Jan Hon, Ludwig Maximilian Univ.

2. "Gender, Sociability, and New Technologies: Emblems in Seventeenth-Century Nürnberg," Mara R. Wade, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Baroque Poets Enlightened: Lessing and Ramler Plan an Anthology," Bryn Savage, Yale Univ.

4. "Petrarchism, Gallantry, and the Transfer of Knowledge in the German Baroque Sonnet," Jan Oliver Jost-Fritz, Technische Universität Berlin

Race and Digital Humanities

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Black American Literature and Culture. Presiding: Howard Rambsy, Southern Illinois Univ.

1. "Digitizing the Past: The Technologies of Recovering Black Lives," Kimberly D. Blockett, Penn State Univ., Brandywine

2. "Digital Africana Studies 3.0: Singularity, Performativity, and Technologizing the Field," Bryan Carter, Univ. of Central Missouri

3. "The Project on the History of Black Writing and Digital Possibilities," Maryemma Graham, Univ. of Kansas

For abstracts, write to hrambsy@siue.edu.

What Works? Integrating Culture into First-Year English and Foreign Language Courses

Thursday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Community College Humanities Association. Presiding: Stacey Lee Donohue, Central Oregon Community Coll.

Speakers: Steven Alvarez, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Michael A. Burke, St. Louis Community Coll., Meramec, MO; Antonio Carrillo, Arizona Western Coll.; Amanda Licastro, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Melissa Strong, Northeastern State Univ.

Respondent: Falk Cammin, Foothill Coll., CA

Faculty members teaching lower-level composition, language, and literature courses look for innovative ways of integrating culture and cultural studies into these general education courses. Panelists representing perspectives from two- and four-year institutions will each give a brief presentation on what works for them in composition and literature courses before opening up discussion to attendees. This roundtable offers an opportunity for collegial dialogue.

For abstracts, visit www.ccha-assoc.org after 1 Dec.

The Future of Higher Education

Thursday, 3:30–5:15 p.m., Grand C, Sheraton

A forum. Presiding: Kathleen Woodward, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Emergent Projects, Processes, and Stories," Sidonie Ann Smith, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. "Learning Collaboratories, Now and in the Future," Curtis Wong, Microsoft Research

3. "It's the Data, Stupid!" Ed Lazowska, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

4. "How to Crowdsource Thinking," Cathy N. Davidson, Duke Univ.

Scholars from the human, natural, and computational sciences will address the future of higher education in a digital age. They will identify problems in higher education today and provide recommendations for what is needed as we go forward. What pressure does this information age exert on the current ways we think about higher education? How does a conversation across the computational sciences and the humanities address, ease, or exacerbate that pressure?

For linked sessions, see meetings 135A and 467.

Multimediated Brecht

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the International Brecht Society. Presiding: Kristopher Imbrigotta, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "'Literarization' and the Radical Potential of Media," Michael Shane Boyle, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Brecht's 'Threepenny Opera Lawsuit': A Contribution to New Media History," Marc David Silberman, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "Brecht's Media Theory: A Popular Reassessment," Michael Ryan, Duke Univ.

Respondent: Henning Wrage, Haverford Coll.

How to Read the New-York Saturday Press

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Leif Eckstrom, Tufts Univ.

1. "On Puffing: The New-York Saturday Press and Secondary Genres of Literary Production," Leif Eckstrom

2. "Whitman's Publics," Virginia Jackson, Univ. of California, Irvine

3. "Ada Clare and the Feminist Feuilleton," Joanna Dale Levin, Chapman Univ.

Respondent: Edward Whitley, Lehigh Univ.

Thinking Memory

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century English Literature and the Discussion Group on Cognitive Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Mark A. Wollaeger, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "The Memory-Theory Conflict," Richard Terdiman, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

2. "The Day in Retrospect: Storm Jameson's Socialist Critique of Memory in the Modernist Day Novel," Elizabeth Covington, Vanderbilt Univ.

3. "Object and Place Memory in Proust, Rilke, and Benjamin," Lorna Martens, Univ. of Virginia

4. "The Will to Forget: Amnesia and Forgetting in Modern Literature," Vincent J. Cheng, Univ. of Utah

How the Recovery of Early American Indian Poetry Changes the History of American Poetry

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 607, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robert Dale Parker, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Dreaming Nationhood in the Shadow of Statehood: Cherokee Poets in the Indian Territory," Daniel Heath Justice, Univ. of Toronto

2. "Ploughing the Mounds: American Indian Poets and Nineteenth-Century American Poetry," Mary Loeffelholz, Northeastern Univ.

3. "The Invisible Country: Resistance, Mourning, and Satire in Native American Poetry from 1899 to 1930," Cary Nelson, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Revisiting Emotion and Gender in the Regency

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Alan Rauch, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

1. "The Mother Attitudes: Ann Taylor's My Mother, Lady Emma Hamilton, and the Rise of Sentimental Children's Poetry," Donelle Ruwe, Northern Arizona Univ.

2. "Feminism and Regendered Generations in Felicia Hemans’s Poetry of the Mid-1820s," James Holt McGavran, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

3. "Rethinking Sympathy in Alastor: Shelley and Emotion Theory," Richard C. Sha, American Univ.

For abstracts, write to arauch@uncc.edu.

Education and Ideology in the Jim Crow South

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Anthony Wilson, La Grange Coll.

1. "'The South Stands with the West': The Triangulation of Jim Crow Schooling across the US Imperium," Clif Stratton, Washington State Univ., Pullman

2. "Twisted Teachers in Woolson's King David and Gaines's A Lesson before Dying," John Wharton Lowe, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

3. "The Homeschooling of Scout Finch," James Kelley, Mississippi State Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.uark.edu/ua/sssl.

Teaching Theory One Generation Later: What Is the Canon in the Introductory Theory Course Now?

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 612, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Barry Sarchett, Colorado Coll.

1. "Teaching the Theory Canon in the Post-theory Moment," Sophia A. McClennen, Penn State Univ., University Park

2. "Beyond Poststructuralism: Teaching Theory in the Digital Era," William Stephen Davis, Colorado Coll.

3. "Theory for People Who Hate Theory: Teaching Theory and Criticism to Creative Writers," James Hanley Donelan, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

4. "Foundational Theory?" Barry Sarchett

5. "Teaching Theory in the Era of Disorganized Cultural Studies," Vincent Barry Leitch, Univ. of Oklahoma

How New Variorum Shakespeare Editors Work

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare. Presiding: Paul Werstine, Univ. of Western Ontario

1. "Editorial Practice," Richard A. Knowles, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

2. "Building a New Variorum Shakespeare Web Site: Julius Caesar," M. L. Stapleton, Indiana Univ.–Purdue Univ., Fort Wayne

3. "'Do Not Mock Me, Fellow Student': Work-Study Assistance," Paul Werstine

Asian American Regionalisms

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Asian American Literature. Presiding: Anita Mannur, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Feeling Blue in the Midwest: Queer Diasporic Aesthetics in Rakesh Satyal's Blue Boy," Martin J. Ponce, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "The Rural and the Global: The Queer South of Monique Truong's Bitter in the Mouth," Denise Cruz, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "'How This Place Eats Us All Up': Beyond the Internment in Lee Ann Roripaugh's Beyond Heart Mountain," Michelle Young-Mee Rhee, Skidmore Coll.

4. "Scaling the South: Vietnamese American Gardens and New Orleans," Marguerite B. Nguyen, Tulane Univ.

Gender and Medieval Literary Form

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship. Presiding: Dorothy Kim, Vassar Coll.

1. "Redefining Genre and Gender: Reading Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies as Historical Fiction," Tegan Zimmerman, Univ. of Alberta

2. "The Emerging Genre of Women's Visionary Texts in the Late Middle Ages," Barbara Zimbalist, Univ. of California, Davis

3. "Exploring Marguerite's Voice in the Middle English Translation of the Mirouer des simples âmes," Emilie Brancato, Univ. of Toronto

4. "The Filtered Voices of Margery Kempe," Eric J. Hyman, Fayetteville State Univ.

For abstracts, visit hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/smfs/mff/.

Connecting Theory and Practice in the Teaching of LCTLs (Less Commonly Taught Languages)

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language. Presiding: Fernando Rubio, Univ. of Utah

1. "The General Second-Language Methods Course: Challenges for Instructors and Implications for the Future of LCTL Pedagogy," Stacey Katz Bourns, Harvard Univ.

2. "Teaching Hebrew in Context," Vardit Ringvald, Brandeis Univ.

3. "Reconsidering Arabic Pedagogy: The Vital Role of Teacher and Teaching," Hussein Elkhafaifi, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Tutors, Models, and Guides in Medieval and Early Modern German Literature

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on German Literature to 1700. Presiding: Sara Suzanne Poor, Princeton Univ.

1. "Gendered Learning in Gottfried's Tristan," Katja Altpeter-Jones, Lewis and Clark Coll.

2. "Inimitable Exemplars: Gertrude of Helfta and the Problem of Writing," Jessica Barr, Eureka Coll.

3. "The Rise of the Literary Iceberg: Why Is Erasmus Widmann So Important to Us?" Albrecht Classen, Univ. of Arizona

Arabic Language and Identity: Transregional Texts and Transnational Discourses

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Karin C. Ryding, Georgetown Univ.

1. "Animating Linguistic Nationalism in Jordan," Elizabeth M. Bergman, Miami Univ., Oxford

2. "The Sound of the People: Popular Music and Identity in Lebanon," Clara Shea, Georgetown Univ.

3. "The Way Forward to Teaching Arabic: Incorporating Dialect with Modern Standard Arabic (MSA)," Georgette Jabbour, Defense Language Inst.

4. "A Baghdadi Party Crasher in Isfahan," Emily J. Selove, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

For abstracts, write to rydingk@georgetown.edu.

The Color Curtain: Political Identity and Solidarity in the Global Cold War

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Anne Garland Mahler, Emory Univ.

1. "Negritude and the Radicalization of Human Rights," Anne W. Gulick, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

2. "In the Belly of the Beast: Tricontinental Visions of the US Civil Rights Movement," Anne Garland Mahler

3. "United Colors of Revolution: From Afro-Asian to Afro-Caribbean Radicalism (1955–74)," Amzat Boukari-Yabara, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

For abstracts, write to anne.mahler@emory.edu.

Rethinking Empathy: Feeling with Others in Contemporary Literature

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 608, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Meghan Marie Hammond, New York Univ.

1. "Women of Color and the Dialectics of Narrative Empathy," Sue J. Kim, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham

2. "Empathic Noise," John Melillo, Univ. of Arizona

3. "'A Mountain of Sensitivities': Autism, Empathy, and the 'More Than Human,'" Ralph James Savarese, Grinnell Coll.

New Approaches to Teaching H.D.

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lara E. Vetter, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

Speakers: Marsha Bryant, Univ. of Florida; Annette Debo, Western Carolina Univ.; Mary DeShazer, Wake Forest Univ.; Madelyn Detloff, Miami Univ., Oxford; Susan McCabe, Univ. of Southern California

This interactive roundtable affords the new teacher and the experienced scholar alike an opportunity to explore more recent approaches to teaching the modernist writer H.D. Participants will address specifically both theoretical orientations toward the subject and classroom pedagogy, inviting the audience to ask questions and share their own experiences.

Slavery, Enlightenment, and the Book

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Lesley Curtis, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

1. "Slavery and the Autobiography: Benjamin Franklin's Account of Slavery and Slave Labor in Eighteenth-Century America," Christen Mucher, Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Helen Maria Williams's Paul and Virginia: Love, the Rights of Man, and Plantation Slavery," David Sigler, Univ. of Idaho

3. "The Book and Slave Trades in Colonial Rhode Island," Sean D. Moore, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

Digital Literary Studies: When Will It End?

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature. Presiding: David A. Golumbia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

1. "Digital Birth, Digital Adoption, Digital Disownment: Reconceiving Computational Textuality," John David Zuern, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

2. "Digital Literary Studies: When Will It End?" David A. Golumbia

3. "Digital Anamnesis," Benjamin J. Robertson, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

Before Normal

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession. Presiding: Helen Deutsch, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Eccentric Bodies, Royal Power, and Baronial Revolt in Thirteenth-Century England," Christopher C. Baswell, Barnard Coll.

2. "Before Normal, There Was Natural: Chironomia, Chirologia, and Natural Signing at the Ottoman and Safavid Courts," Elizabeth Bearden, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "Vulgar Image and the National Imagination: Scriblerian Satire and the Canon Controversy in Britain, 1797–1824," Matthew Reilly, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1812–68: The Literary Landscape of Spain

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. Presiding: Dale J. Pratt, Brigham Young Univ., UT

1. "The Clothes Make the Man: Fashioning Masculinity in Early-Nineteenth-Century Spain," Collin McKinney, Bucknell Univ.

2. "Resurveying the Literary Landscape: From Martínez de la Rosa to the Alta Comedia," Norma H. Richardson, Central Michigan Univ.

3. "Cultural Memory and National Obligation in Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer's Leyendas," Sarah P. H. Sierra, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

Crossing Boundaries in Seventeenth-, Eighteenth-, and Nineteenth-Century Italian Literature

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-, Eighteenth-, and Nineteenth-Century Italian Literature. Presiding: Nathalie Hester, Univ. of Oregon

1. "Poetic Translation in Nineteenth-Century Italy," Jacob Blakesley, Univ. of Chicago

2. "Verism, Folklore, and Narrative Revenge: Marchesa Colombi’s In risaia," Silvia Valisa, Florida State Univ.

3. "Cristina Trivulzio di Belgiojoso’s Exile: Seeking Asylum in the Liminal World of Language and Memory," Irene Zanini-Cordi, Florida State Univ.

Indigenous Languages and Literatures in the Americas

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Ethnic Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Cheryl A. Higashida, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

Speakers: Lisa Brooks, Harvard Univ.; Luis E. Cárcamo-Huechante, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Tony Johnson, Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe; Penelope M. Kelsey, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Margaret A. Noori, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Craig Perez, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa; Frederick H. White, Slippery Rock Univ.

This session will explore Indigenous languages within a hemispheric context, bringing together scholars working on the Americas and Pacific Islands, with emphasis on tribal nations that cross settler borders and on tribal linguistic concerns. Vital to the discussions will be language revitalization, treaty rhetorics, and self-representation, in creative and scholarly modes, from within or outside tribal communities and within or outside the academy.

Preference

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism. Presiding: Rei Terada, Univ. of California, Irvine

1. "Unreasonable Preference and Critical Poiesis," Matthew Tierney, Brown Univ.

2. "Free Preference and Prepolitical Art," Erin Trapp, Univ. of California, Irvine

3. "H.D.'s 'Calcomania': Preference or Prejudice?" Jeannie Im, New York Univ.

Respondent: Timothy Bewes, Brown Univ.

Professional Employment Practices for Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Members

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession

Speakers: Sandra K. Baringer, Univ. of California, Riverside; Janet Galligani Casey, Skidmore Coll.; Douglas Hesse, Univ. of Denver; Elizabeth Landers, Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis

Members of the committee will present the 2011 document "Professional Employment Practices for Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Members: Recommendations and Evaluative Questions." Discussion will focus on how faculty members and department chairs can use the evaluative questions to assess employment practices in their own departments and how they can best implement the recommendations described in the document.

Disaster/Collapse

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science. Presiding: John Bruni, Grand Valley State Univ.

1. "Representing Climate Change in Time: Narrative Speed in Kim Stanley Robinson's Science in the Capital Trilogy," Molly Wallace, Queen's Univ.

2. "Posthuman Endgames," John Bruni

3. "Apocalypticism and Sustainability," Ira Livingston, Pratt Inst.

The Graphic Novel in Latin America

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature. Presiding: Hilda Chacón, Nazareth Coll. of Rochester

1. "Criminal Melodrama and Hypertrophic Gesture in ¡Alarma! and ¡Casos de Alarma!," Sergio Delgado, Harvard Univ.

2. "La grabadora: En busca de una historia alternativa," Javier Gonzalez, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

3. "Rupay, the Photojournalistic Archive, and the Sendero War," Kent L. Dickson, California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona

Transgendering Psychoanalysis

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Kathryn Bond Stockton, Univ. of Utah

1. "The Law of the Butch Father," Judith Halberstam, Univ. of Southern California

2. "The Transgendered Womb?" Denise Fulbrook, Univ. of Kentucky

3. "Aggression and Life in the World Outside," Gayle Salamon, Princeton Univ.

Voicing Documentary

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society. Presiding: James V. Catano, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

1. "Voice-Over Narration in the Cold War Documentary," Jose Capino, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "The Essay Film and the Ontology of the Epistolary Image: Akerman, Marker, Godard," Rebecca Sheehan, Harvard Univ.

3. "Voicing Authority: Confessing before God and Errol Morris," James V. Catano

Romania's Intellectuals and Ceauşescu's Secret Police

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Romanian Studies. Presiding: Valentina N. Glajar, Texas State Univ.; Jeanine Teodorescu, Lexington Coll.

Speakers: Monica Garoiu, Kenyon Coll.; Valentina N. Glajar; Anca Luca Holden, Univ. of Georgia; Corina Liliana Petrescu, Univ. of Mississippi; Cristina Petrescu, Univ. of Bucharest; Dragos Petrescu, Univ. of Bucharest

Respondent: Jeanine Teodorescu

This roundtable explores stories of collaboration, surveillance, and resistance as documented in the files of the Securitate or fictionalized in literature and films. The discussion will address issues such as “east-ethical” versus genuine literary works produced under communism; genderless persecution or dissent; and postsocialist reflections in texts by Herta Müller, Ana Blandiana, Richard Wagner, Monica Lovinescu, and Eginald Schlattner.

For abstracts, write to glajar@txstate.edu after 3 Jan.

Invisibility

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Claire B. Goldstein, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Glorifying the Invisible Hand: Representations of Royal Agency at Versailles and in Louis XIV's Mémoires," Hall Bjornstad, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "L'ailleurs et l'invisible: La tragédie de l'absence chez Racine," Sylvaine Guyot, Harvard Univ.

3. "Classical Objects," Chloé Hogg, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Class in the Classroom: 2012

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Radical Caucus in English and the Modern Languages. Presiding: Grover C. Furr, Montclair State Univ.

1. "Working-Class American Literature: Reading from the Bottom Up," Jason Stupp, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

2. "Taking the Low Road to Revolution: Inside the Classroom and Beyond," Joseph Ramsey, Emmanuel Coll.

3. "Teaching Class Consciousness and Seventeenth-Century English Poetry," Harold Aram Veeser, City Coll., City Univ. of New York

4. "Class Consciousness in Ousmane Sembene's God's Bits of Wood and Manlio Argueta's One Day of Life," Grover C. Furr

For abstracts, write to furrg@mail.montclair.edu after 1 Jan.

Women for Ecological Justice

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by Women in German. Presiding: Alice Ann Kuzniar, Univ. of Waterloo; Jacqueline Vansant, Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn

1. "Bettina von Arnim’s Der Königssohn: An Antipoetic Tale of the Golden Age?" Paola Mayer, Univ. of Guelph

2. "For the Love of Animals: Companion-Species Stories and Posthumanist History in Haushofer, Lange-Müller, and Kronauer," Cecilia Novero, Otago Univ.

3. "Anständig essen von Karen Duve: Eine feministische Sicht auf ökologische Fragen?" Nadine Nowroth, Trinity Coll., Dublin

Medievalism and Marlowe

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Marlowe Society of America and the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society. Presiding: Robert Alexander Logan, Univ. of Hartford

1. "Marlowe's Ars Moriendi," Andrew D. McCarthy, Univ. of Tennessee, Chattanooga

2. "A Medieval Tamburlaine: Marlowe and the Legacy of the Crusades," Lee Manion, Yeshiva Univ., NY

3. "Marlowe and Medieval Albania," David McInnis, Univ. of Melbourne

For abstracts, visit www.marlowesmightyline.org.

Traveling Melville

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the Melville Society. Presiding: Milette Shamir, Tel Aviv Univ.

1. "‘The Other Side of the Sphere’: Melville and Australasia," Paul D. Giles, Univ. of Sydney

2. "Traveling Theory and Paul de Man’s Translation of Moby-Dick," Michael G. Boyden, Ghent Univ. Coll.

3. "Rockwell Kent’s Cold War," Nicholas Donofrio, Harvard Univ.

4. "Herman Melville, Japanese Literature, and the Contemporary Scholarship of the Borderless," Yuji Kato, Tokyo Univ. of Foreign Studies

For papers, visit melvillesociety.org/en/conferences-and-events/mla-conference.

Art of the Oppressed: Global Performance and Resistance

Thursday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: David C. Lloyd, Univ. of Southern California

1. "Dance of the Oppressed: Art, Identity, and Resistance," Omar Barghouti, East Jerusalem

2. "Radical Theater in Ireland," Ulick Lionel Pilkington, National Univ. of Ireland, Galway

3. "The Strike as Aesthetic Form: The Performances of Harlan County USA," Laura Harris, Duke Univ.

Race and Metaphor in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century American and Continental Thought

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Thomas Lewis Morgan, Univ. of Dayton

1. "Race and Animal Metaphors: Narrative Strategies in Comparative Physiognomy," Elisa Segnini, Dalhousie Univ.

2. "Did He Really Just Say That? Race and Metaphor in the Letters of Ignatius Sancho," Sören Hammerschmidt, Ghent Univ.

3. "Doubting Transformable Race: Hugh Henry Brackenridge and the Textuality of Natural History," Katherine L. Chiles, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

No(Bodies): Ghost Children in Juvenile Literature

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Children's Literature Association. Presiding: Elizabeth Talafuse, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

1. "Invisible Playmates; or, Childhood Ghosts and Adult Comfort in Burnett, Canton, and Kipling," Judith Abrams Plotz, George Washington Univ.

2. "My Other Me: Ghost Doubles in Nineteenth-Century American Children's Poetry," Angela Franceska Sorby, Marquette Univ.

3. "Children of Air: Children's Poetry and the Spectral Child," Richard McDonnell Flynn, Georgia Southern Univ.

4. "Embodied in Name Alone: Nobody Owens and the Metonymic Estrangement from the Living and the Dead in Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book," Joseph Michael Sommers, Central Michigan Univ.

Postcolonial Studies and Literary Form

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Simon E. Gikandi, Princeton Univ.

1. "Deranged Illuminations, Peripheral Forms," Sanjay Krishnan, Boston Univ.

2. "W. E. B. DuBois and the Poetics of Internationalism," Yogita Goyal, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Césaire's Voice Lessons," Benjamin Conisbee Baer, Princeton Univ.

Metamorphoses of Reason and Progress in Early Modern England

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: David Simon, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "The Monastic Impulse in Post-Reformation England: Spenser to Herbert," Joshua Phillips, Univ. of Memphis

2. "Andrew Marvell's Experimental Nunnery," David Simon

3. "'Thou Art My Sister': Physico-theology and Sympathy," Joanna Picciotto, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Trauma and Sexuality in Contemporary African American Literature

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Christina Sharpe, Tufts Univ.

1. "Wading in the Water: The Brother-Sister Plays," Soyica Diggs Colbert, Dartmouth Coll.

2. "Trauma and Intersectionality in Contemporary African American Literature," Aida Hussen, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "She Heard Nothing: Traumatized Cat and the Unsympathetic Listener in Gayl Jones's Corregidora," Robert J. Patterson, Georgetown Univ.

Respondent: Christina Sharpe

For abstracts, write to soyica.colbert@dartmouth.edu.

What Do We Talk about When We Talk about Sensationalism?

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: David M. Stewart, National Central Univ., Taiwan

1. "Buntline versus Hawthorne: Sensationalism and Its Discontents," David John Anthony, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale

2. "Sensationalism in Temperance Literature," Karen Renner, Northern Arizona Univ.

3. "Canonical Sentiments, Noncanonical Sensations," David M. Stewart

American Exceptionalism after 9/11

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Wilson N. Brissett, United States Air Force Acad.

1. "State Secrecy, American Exceptionalism, and the War on Terror," Timothy Melley, Miami Univ., Oxford

2. "Periodizing Recent History: 9/11, American Exceptionalism, and Don DeLillo's Cosmopolis," Ryan Poll, Northeastern Illinois Univ.

3. "Local Resistance to American Exceptionalism in Gilead and Jayber Crow," Wilson N. Brissett

George Sand and/in Translation

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the George Sand Association. Presiding: Lauren Ravalico, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

1. "Lost in Translation: George Sand's Indiana and the Eighteenth-Century Desert Island," Kathrine M. Bonin, Widener Univ.

2. "The Spiritual Androgyny of George Sand's Consuelo Translated as Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh," Linda M. Lewis, Bethany Coll., KS

3. "Translating George: Eliot Reads Sand," Alexandra K. Wettlaufer, Univ. of Texas, Austin

For abstracts, visit www.hofstra.edu/georgesand.

Keeping the Lights On: Shared Governance in the Corporate University

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities. Presiding: Reinhard Albert Mayer, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Speakers: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park; Thomas Harrison, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Erin Skye Mackie, Syracuse Univ.; Cary Nelson, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; David Wills, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York

A roundtable on closures and restructuring in the humanities and how these compromise academic freedom and threaten higher education.

Reading and the Medium of Literature

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Patrizia C. McBride, Cornell Univ.

1. "Roles for Readers: Jünger, Brecht, and Döblin," Derek Hillard, Kansas State Univ.

2. "Reading Romanticism as Perfected Communication," May Mergenthaler, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "Literature and Media Culture: Metapoetics," Yael Almog, Univ. of California, Berkeley

4. "Intermediality as a Way of Reading," Thomas O. Haakenson, Minneapolis Coll. of Art and Design

Gender and Voice: Orality, Dissent, and Community in the Late Middle Ages

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship. Presiding: Dorothy Kim, Vassar Coll.

1. "Performing Ourselves: Gendering and Voicing in Pater Noster Commentaries," Katherine G. Zieman, Univ. of Notre Dame

2. "Gender and the Unruly Female Voice in Piers Plowman," Nicole Nolan Sidhu, East Carolina Univ.

3. "The Inscription of the Voice and Medieval Materiality in Teresa of Ávila's Camino de perfección," Dorian Lugo-Bertrán, Univ. of Puerto Rico

4. "The Gendered Voices of Leonor López de Córdoba and Teresa de Cartagena," Anthony J. Cárdenas-Rotunno, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

For abstracts, visit hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/smfs/mff/.

Luso-Brazilian Literatures and the Critical Global Humanities

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature and the American Portuguese Studies Association. Presiding: Luiz Fernando Valente, Brown Univ.

1. "Imperfect Masks: Manuel dos Santos Lima and the Invention of Postcolonial Angola," Ana Catarina Teixeira, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

2. "The Critic Criticized: Rubem Fonseca, Roberto Bolaño, and the Plight of the Institutional Intellectual," Frans Weiser, Univ. of Pittsburgh

3. "'Comparar é preciso': Reading Guimarães Rosa Globally," Luiz Fernando Valente

Passions in Premodern Hispanic Literature (XV–XVII Centuries)

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sanda Munjic, Univ. of Toronto

1. "Women's Voiced Desire and Muted Passions: Teresa de Cartagena and Santa Teresa," Yonsoo Kim, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

2. "Passion, Science, and Transcendence in Plato, Fox Morcillo, and San Juan de la Cruz," Susan K. Byrne, Yale Univ.

3. "The Passion of the Court: Shame and the Politics of Desire in Early Modern Spain," Paul Michael Johnson, Univ. of California, Irvine

For abstracts, write to sanda.munjic@utoronto.ca after 10 Dec.

Linear Isomorphism and Represented Environments in the British Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Scott R. MacKenzie, Univ. of British Columbia

1. "Deviant Lines in Tristram Shandy and Gilpin's Picturesque," Scott R. MacKenzie

2. "Barometer Readings: Isotherms, Dickens, and Geographical Imagination," Jen Hill, Univ. of Nevada, Reno

3. "'The Insides of Things': Edwin Abbott's Flatland and Victorian Spatio-Linear Perspective," Deanna Kreisel, Univ. of British Columbia

For abstracts, visit faculty.arts.ubc.ca/smackenzie/.

Toward New Humanity: Theoretical Interventions into Literature in Modern Chinese Aesthetics

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Ban Wang, Stanford Univ.

1. "New Humanity in History: Wang Guowei's Literary Criticism and Aesthetic Configuration of Modern Chinese Subjectivity," Satoru Hashimoto, Harvard Univ.

2. "Subjectivity in an Era of Collectivity: On Li Zehou's Aesthetics, 1956–62," Xiang He, New York Univ.

3. "Drift Aesthetics Come Home: Liu Zaifu's Hong Kong Oeuvre in Mainland China," Nick Admussen, Princeton Univ.

Writing the Cuban Nation

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 617, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Joseph M. Viera, Nazareth Coll. of Rochester

1. "Woman as National Subject and Body: Two Heads of the Cuban Medusa," Mabel Cuesta, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

2. "Blogs, Google Maps, and Social Networks: An Open-Source Approach to Cuban Nationalism in a Postnational Media Environment," Osvaldo Cleger, Univ. of Arizona

3. "Nation, Costumbrismo, and Ethnography in Nineteeth-Century Cuba," Daylet Dominguez, Princeton Univ.

4. "Writing the Revolution: A Cuban American Graphic Perspective," Joseph M. Viera

Writing the Jasmine Revolution and Tahrir Square: Graffiti, Film, Collage, Poetry

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Kathryn Lachman, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

1. "Tagging the Jasmine Revolution: Social Media and Graffiti in the Tunisian Uprising," David Fieni, Cornell Univ.

2. "Quand la révolution filmique anticipe la révolution populaire," Mirvet Médini Kammoun, Institut Supérieur des Beaux-Arts de Tunis

3. "The Women's Manifesto: Thinking Egypt 2011 Transnationally," Basuli Deb, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

4. "Poetic Responses to the North African Revolutions," Mahdia Benguesmia, Univ. of Batna

For abstracts, write to klachman@llc.umass.edu.

Romantic Comedy, Romantic Play

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Wordsworth-Coleridge Association. Presiding: Frederick L. Burwick, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Wordsworth's Folly," Matthew Bevis, Univ. of York

2. "Copyright and Repertory, Comedy and Canon," Michael Gamer, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Theatrical Bluestocking Feminism," Susanne Schmid, Freie Univ. Berlin

4. "Playing Games with John Clare," Eric H. Robinson, Falls Church, VA

Comparing Modern Literatures Worldwide: Can It Be Done within the Current MLA Structure?

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. Presiding: John Burt Foster, George Mason Univ.

Speakers: Thomas Oliver Beebee, Penn State Univ., University Park; Marcel H. Cornis-Pope, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.; Françoise Lionnet, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Christopher Lupke, Washington State Univ., Pullman; Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Ramón Saldívar, Stanford Univ.

Addressing key examples worldwide, speakers will discuss (in the following order) Lusophonia, global China, east-central European literatures, Africa and its diasporas, South Asia, and hemispheric Americas.

For short statements, write to jfoster@gmu.edu after 1 Dec.

Field Bibliographer Training for the MLA International Bibliography

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography. Presiding: Gregory Grazevich, MLA

Training for current and prospective MLA Bibliography field bibliographers.

What's Still Missing? What Now? What Next? Digital Archives in American Literature

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Brad Evans, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

Speakers: Donna M. Campbell, Washington State Univ., Pullman; Julia H. Flanders, Brown Univ.; Kenneth M. Price, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln; Oya Rieger, Cornell Univ.; Robert Scholes, Brown Univ.; Jeremy York, HathiTrust Digital Library

This roundtable has two goals: (1) to provide a forum for reflection on the first twenty years of the digital archive, especially as it relates to American materials, which might include consideration of what is still missing and of methodologies for making use of what is there now, and (2) to offer an opportunity for researchers who have become dependent on the archive to talk with major players in its production, in the hope of fostering new avenues for cooperation.

Juárez Bleeds: Violence and Globalization in the United States–Mexico Borderlands

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Chicana and Chicano Literature. Presiding: John Morán González, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Literature as Activism and as a Form of Transnational Feminist Praxis: Reading the Feminidicios in Alicia Gaspar de Alba's Desert Blood," Isabel Quintana-Wulf, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "Crime, Spectacle, and the Disappearance of Truth: Reading the Femicides of Ciudad Juárez," Roberto Ponce-Cordero, Univ. of Pittsburgh

3. "Transnational Feminisms and the Unheard Confession of Sergio Barraza: Redirecting the Necrophilic Gaze from Border Town Rape to Life in Juárez," Marcelle Maese-Cohen, Univ. of California, Berkeley

The Job I Got

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the ADE Executive Committee. Presiding: Lisa R. Schneider, Columbus State Community Coll., OH

Speakers: Ron Broglio, Arizona State Univ.; Rachel Brooks-Pannell, Columbus State Community Coll., OH; Colleen Rosenfeld, Pomona Coll.

Recently hired graduates will discuss their approaches to finding employment in English departments.

Transforming Community Service into Public Scholarship: Strategies for Women

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession. Presiding: Carmaletta M. Williams, Johnson County Community Coll., KS

1. "On Stage in the Annual Activity Report: Making the Case for Public Scholarship," Rosemary Erickson Johnsen, Governors State Univ.

2. "Publicly Engaged Professionals: An Untold Institutional Story," Carla Kaplan, Northeastern Univ.

3. "From Task Lists to Published Texts," Joycelyn K. Moody, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio

Joan Maragall: A Legacy of Engagement

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Catalan Language and Literature. Presiding: Paula A. Sprague, Trinity Coll., CT

1. "Resurrecting Language: Goethe's Faust and Maragall's El comte Arnau," Cynthia J. Malik, Stanford Univ.

2. "Maragall: Traductor europeo," Francesco Ardolino, Univ. of Barcelona

3. "Joan Maragall and Víctor Català: An Epistolary Relationship," María-Luisa Guardiola, Swarthmore Coll.

4. "Joan Maragall and the Affects of Catalanism," Javier Krauel, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

For abstracts, write to paula.sprague@trincoll.edu.

Change and Perception of Change in the Romance Languages

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change. Presiding: Chris Palmer, Kennesaw State Univ.

1. "The Spread of Ne Pas in French," Angus Grieve-Smith, Saint John's Univ., NY

2. "Language Change and Maintenance in Galicia," Obdulia E. Castro, Regis Univ.

3. "Speakers' Perceptions of Contemporary Linguistic Change: Italian 'Grammar' Pages on Facebook," Jana Vizmuller-Zocco, York Univ., Keele

The Very Thought of the University

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Philosophical Approaches to Literature. Presiding: David L. Clark, McMaster Univ.

1. "The University of Disaster," Susan Searls Giroux, McMaster Univ.

2. "Reflections on Academic Freedom in the Twenty-First Century," Joan DelFattore, Univ. of Delaware, Newark

3. "The Ripeness of Decay: Thinking the University in the Twenty-First Century," Carolyn Lesjak, Simon Fraser Univ.

Language, Literature, and Learning in English Renaissance Pedagogy

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature of the English Renaissance, Excluding Shakespeare. Presiding: Alan Stewart, Columbia Univ.

1. "England's Grammar Schools and the Specter of Rome," Andrew Wallace, Carleton Univ.

2. "Academic Embarrassment in Early Modern England," Elizabeth Hanson, Queen's Univ.

3. "Tudor Education and Its Literary Discontents," Lynn Enterline, Vanderbilt Univ.

The Futures of Jewish American Literature: Celebrating the New Studies in American Jewish Literature

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 303, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Benjamin Schreier, Penn State Univ., University Park

Speakers: Dean Joseph Franco, Wake Forest Univ.; Jonathan E. Freedman, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Daniel Itzkovitz, Stonehill Coll.; Dalia Kandiyoti, Coll. of Staten Island, City Univ. of New York; Michael P. Kramer, Bar-Ilan Univ.; Laurence D. Roth, Susquehanna Univ.; Maeera Yaffa Shreiber, Univ. of Utah

Jewish American literature is a booming field these days, as an area both of literary production and of academic inquiry. Studies in American Jewish Literature has been since 1975 the leading journal in the field. As its founding editor, Dan Walden, steps down this year, this roundtable offers the new editorial board an opportunity to examine the futures open to Jewish American literary study.

Fiction and Theory in Julia Kristeva

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Kelly Oliver, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "Italy and the Literary in Julia Kristeva," Carol Mastrangelo Bové, Univ. of Pittsburgh

2. "The Wagers of Discretion: Fiction as Inverted Theory," Miglena Nikolchina, Sofia Univ.

3. "Murder in the Society of the Spectacle," Frances L. Restuccia, Boston Coll.

4. "Noir Analysis: How Kristeva's Detective Fiction Transforms Psychoanalysis," Benigno Trigo, Vanderbilt Univ.

For abstracts, write to Benigno.Trigo@vanderbilt.edu.

Goethe and Islam: Beyond the Orientalism Aporia?

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Goethe Society of North America. Presiding: Max Reinhart, Univ. of Georgia

1. "Goethe's West-östlicher Divan: Negotiating the West-East Hyphen," Pouneh Saeedi, Univ. of Toronto

2. "'Himmelslehr in Erdesprachen': Knowledge, Belief, and the Poetry of Islam in Goethe's Divan," Hamid Tafazoli, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "Goethe's Approach to Islam in the Divan 'Notes and Essays,'" Martin Bidney, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

Textual Scholarship and African Americanist Studies

Thursday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: George B. Hutchinson, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

1. "A Is for Abolitionist: Type, Print, and the Media Representation of Slavery," Ezra Greenspan, Southern Methodist Univ.

2. "Black Boy and American Hunger: Richard Wright, Revision, and Narrative Systems," John Kevin Young, Marshall Univ.

3. "More Than McKay and Guillen: The Caribbean in Bontemps and Hughes's The Poetry of the Negro," Ifeoma C. K. Nwankwo, Vanderbilt Univ.

Respondent: Leon Jackson, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

For abstracts, write to youngj@marshall.edu after 15 Dec.

The Future of Learning

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand C, Sheraton

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum The Future of Higher Education (69). Presiding: Tara McPherson, Univ. of Southern California

Speakers: Cathy N. Davidson, Duke Univ.; Curtis Wong, Microsoft Research

This session is a moderated conversation between two scholars whose work spans the human and natural sciences and who have spent their careers communicating specialized research to a broader public. In an era of stressed resources on the national, state, and individual level, the future of learning demands an educated public championing the importance of higher education.

Modeling Girlhood: Reassessing Martha Finley's Elsie Dinsmore Series

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Gregory Eiselein, Kansas State Univ.

1. "Desiring Fathers and Redemptive Daughters: Family Values in Martha Finley's Elsie Dinsmore Series," Allison Giffen, Western Washington Univ.

2. "Growing Old Gracefully: Elsie Dinsmore as a Model of Female Maturity," Robin L. Cadwallader, Saint Francis Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Traversing The Wide, Wide World: Ellen Montgomery, Elsie Dinsmore, and Travel in Nineteenth-Century Girls' Books," LuElla Putnam, Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater

Business Meeting of the Cervantes Society of America

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Presiding: Howard Mancing, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

"Las piernas de la duquesa: Mujer, nobleza y matrimonio en el tiempo de Cervantes," Mercedes Alcalá Galán, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Revisionary Nation: New Frontiers in the War on Terror

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Timothy Melley, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Perpetually Falling: Revisions of America in Don DeLillo's Falling Man," Shawn Jasinski, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

2. "A Terrible Beauty? The Abu Ghraib Aesthetics of Deadwood," Alex Young, Univ. of Southern California

3. "The Other Heading of America," Jonathan W. D. Murphy, Univ. of Western Ontario

Peripheral Conversations: South-South Dialogues

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on English Literature Other Than British and American. Presiding: Faith Lois Smith, Brandeis Univ.

1. "The Revolution Will Be Cartooned! African Political Cartoonists and the North African Uprising," Tejumola Olaniyan, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

2. "Racial Otherings Twice Removed," Sze Wei Ang, Hong Kong Univ.

3. "Migration and Magic: Counternarratives in Who Slashed Celanire’s Throat?," Alison Klein, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

4. "Lebanon in Brazil," Waïl S. Hassan, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Whitman and the Ultracontemporary: Between Crisis and Innovation

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 608, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Matt Miller, Yeshiva Univ., NY

1. "'A New Orientation': Whitman beyond Elegy and Utopia," Anton Vander Zee, Coll. of Charleston

2. "Whitman and Twenty-First-Century Experimental Poetics," Matt Miller

3. "Kindred Darkness: Whitman, New Orleans, and Poetry after Katrina," Matt Sandler, Gettysburg Coll.

For expanded abstracts, visit blogs.cofc.edu/vanderzeeal/mla-2012/.

What Popular Culture Suggests about Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice . . . and Vice Versa

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Psychoanalytic Association. Presiding: Mari Ruti, Univ. of Toronto

1. "What Star Trek Suggests about Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice . . . and Vice Versa," Esther Rashkin, Univ. of Utah

2. "Philip Roth's 'Indignation': The Roots and Consequences of Unbridled Indignation," Margaret Crastnopol, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Affect, Distance, Confession: Emotion and Popular Music

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture. Presiding: Sonnet Retman, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "(I Can't Get No) Affect," John W. Mowitt, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "Approaching Odd Future (OFWGKTA) from a Distant Place," Barry Shank, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "'A Compulsion to Be Honest with My Audience': Joni Mitchell and Confession," David R. Shumway, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

Respondent: Sonnet Retman

A Creative Conversation: Ruth Ozeki with Susan Squier

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Susan Merrill Squier, Penn State Univ., University Park

Speaker: Ruth Ozeki, Whaletown, BC

Canadian-American writer, award-winning filmmaker, and ordained Buddhist priest, Ruth Ozeki will converse with Susan Squier on the theme Pain Free. Their conversation will wander from such agricultural innovations as genetically engineering animals so that they feel no pain to questions of affect and academia to Zen and suffering. The conversation will be interspersed with readings.

Society and the Sacred in Colonial Latin America

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Colonial Latin American Literatures. Presiding: Stephanie Louise Kirk, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "Criolla Saintliness Incarnate: La Azucena of Quito," Stacey Schlau, West Chester Univ.

2. "Construyendo al predicador criollo: Retórica sagrada, deixis criolla y subjetividad colonial en las obras de Fray Martín de Velasco y Joseph Delgadillo y Sotomayor," Juan Vitulli, Univ. of Notre Dame

3. "Sacred Blackness in Seventeenth-Century Lima: The Christian Black Lives of San Martín de Porres and Úrsula de Jesús," Larissa Brewer-García, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Memory in Modern Jewish Literature

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of Professors of Yiddish. Presiding: Victoria Aarons, Trinity Univ.

1. "Chaim Grade and Memories of Vilna," Theodore L. Steinberg, State Univ. of New York, Fredonia

2. "Dis-integrated Testimony: Irony, Displacement, and Time in the Poetics of Dan Pagis," Shellie McCullough, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

3. "The Bellarosa Connection: Saul Bellow's Yiskor Service," Ezra Cappell, Univ. of Texas, El Paso

Comparative Literature and the Work of Translation: The Case of Hungary

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Hungarian Literature. Presiding: Enikö Molnár Basa, Library of Congress

1. "Entangled Literatures and the Beginnings of Global Comparative Literature: Visions on Translation and the Acta Comparationis Litterarum Universarum Revisited," Levente T. Szabó, Babeş-Bolyai Univ.

2. "Gender, Translation, and Comparative Literature: Women in Hungary in the Nineteenth Century," Zsuzsanna Varga, Univ. of Glasgow

3. "Dezső Kosztolányi's English Translations and Their Role in the Formation of Hungarian Literary Scholarship," Adriana Varga, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

4. "Comparativism as/in Exile," Sándor Hites, Hungarian Acad. of Sciences

Women of the Woolf: Influence, Affinity, Obscurity

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Virginia Woolf Society. Presiding: Brenda S. Helt, Metropolitan State Univ.

1. "Not Another Judith Shakepeare: The Real Matriarchal Lineage of Mary Colum," Denise Ayo, Univ. of Notre Dame

2. "Making Room for Olive Moore: A New Woman Responds to Virginia Woolf," Renee A. Dickinson, Radford Univ.

3. "Other Hemispheres: Ling Shuhua, Katherine Mansfield, and Woolfian Influence," Meghan Marie Hammond, New York Univ.

Global Markets, Literary Locales: Remapping Southern Spaces

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Southern Literature. Presiding: Leigh Anne Duck, Univ. of Mississippi

1. "Trading Faith: Religion as a Market Force in the Colonial South," K. Merinda Simmons, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2. "Global Capitalism and Antebellum Social Reform: Maria McIntosh's Critique of Slavery in The Lofty and the Lowly," Katharine A. Burnett, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

3. "Circuit and Flow: Process Geography and the Writing of Alice Dunbar Nelson," Judith I. Madera, Wake Forest Univ.

4. "From the Deep North to the Global South: United States Empire, South Texas, and Figurations of Underground Economic Railroads in Gayl Jones's Mosquito," Sharada Balachandran Orihuela, Univ. of California, Davis

The Environment, Trauma, and Contemporary Fiction

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Suzanne Lalonde, Univ. of Texas, Brownsville

1. "Melancholy Objects," Timothy Morton, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "The Bestiary and Modern Imagination," Bernhard F. Malkmus, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "The Bombing of Nagasaki," Shazia Rahman, Western Illinois Univ.

4. "Elegy for a World That Dies in Every One of Us: Luis Sepúlveda and The Old Man Who Read Love Stories," Luis Rodriguez-Abad, Univ. of Texas, Brownsville

For abstracts, visit LalondeUTB.yolasite.com.

Digital Humanities and Internet Research

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: John Jones, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

1. "Creating a Conceptual Search Engine and Multimodal Corpus for Humanities Research," Robin A. Reid, Texas A&M Univ., Commerce

2. "What the Digital Can't Remember," John Jones

3. "Toward a Rhetoric of Collaboration: An Online Resource for Teaching and Learning Research," Jennifer Sano-Franchini, Michigan State Univ.

For abstracts, visit robinannereid.dreamwidth.org.

Language, Literature, and . . . ? New Models for Foreign Language Departments

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures. Presiding: Jessie M. Labov, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Speakers: Thomas J. Garza, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Tomislav Z. Longinovic, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Robert Romanchuk, Florida State Univ.; Gabriella Safran, Stanford Univ.; Lisa Ryoko Wakamiya, Florida State Univ.

A roundtable on Slavic and other foreign language departments addressing the changing demands of students, administrators, and the profession itself. After a brief overview of the challenges presented by disciplinary paradigm shifts and the recent fiscal crisis, presenters will offer their ideas for viable solutions, work-arounds, and strategies that have been (or could be) successful in the face of institutional change.

For description and biographies, visit mlaslavicdivision2012.blogspot.com/.

Narrative and/in Wittgenstein

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Bernard Rhie, Williams Coll.

1. "Is Narrative a Something or a Nothing?" Robert Chodat, Boston Univ.

2. "Wittgenstein and the Literary Conception of Selfhood," John Gibson, Univ. of Louisville

3. "Running against the Boundaries of Language: Lectures on Ethics by Kafka and Wittgenstein," Yi-Ping Ong, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

Hermann Broch and the Modern Novel

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Gwyneth E. Cliver, Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha; Paul Michael Lützeler, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "Poetics of Opposites: 'The Story of the Salvation Army Girl in Berlin' as an Allegory of Hope," Sun-Young Kim, Kalamazoo Coll.

2. "Myth and the Modern Novel: Hermann Broch and Thomas Mann," Rachel Harland, Univ. of Oxford

3. "Architectural Aesthetics and the Modern Novel: Hermann Broch, James Joyce, and John Dos Passos," Sarah McGaughey, Dickinson Coll.

Respondent: Jennifer L. Jenkins, Pacific Lutheran Univ.

For abstracts, visit artsci.wustl.edu/~iab/symposien.htm.

Mutant Fictions: Networks, Objects, and Cities in the New Wave of Spanish Narrative

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Jesse Barker, Univ. of British Columbia

1. "A Brief History and Interpretation of Spanish 'Mutant' Fiction," Jesse Barker

2. "Rethinking the Margin; or, How to Build a City from a Metaphor in Vicente Luis Mora's Circular 07: Las afueras," Alexandra Saum-Pascual, Univ. of California, Riverside

3. "Reeking of Trash and Spamming the Literary Field: Agustín Fernández Mallo," Christine Henseler, Union Coll., NY

Authority, Sovereignty, Postcoloniality: Recent Narratives of Dictatorship

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Jini Kim Watson, New York Univ.

1. "Writing against Postcoloniality: From Residual Autonomy to Emergent Class Consciousness in Arundhati Roy and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o," John Maerhofer, Bronx Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "Kaleidoscopic Sovereignty: The Entanglement-Delinking Dialectic in Postcolonial Writing," Firat Oruc, Northwestern Univ.

3. "Cultural Capital and Sovereignty in the Fiction of Lydia Kwa," Weihsin Gui, Univ. of California, Riverside

For abstracts, write to jkw1@nyu.edu.

Genre in the Genome Age

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 303, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Everett Hamner, Western Illinois Univ.

1. "Genomic Life Writing," Ann Jurecic, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "White Teeth, Middlesex, and Genomic Fiction," Everett Hamner

Respondents: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park; Priscilla B. Wald, Duke Univ.

Transforming the Atlantic: Caribbean-Scottish (Post)Colonial Relations

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Carla Sassi, Univ. of Verona

1. "I, Daughter: (Auto)Biography, Anxiety, and Familial Quest for Scotch Blood in Grenada and the Grenadines," Joan L. Anim-Addo, Univ. of London, Goldsmiths Coll.

2. "Fellow Travelers: Scottish Women Writers on Slavery in the West Indies, 1775–92," Corey Edward Andrews, Youngstown State Univ.

3. "Maroon Memories of the Scottish Empire," Michael Morris, Univ. of Glasgow

4. "Writing Bodies and Affects: Caribbean-Scottish Relations Affecting the Politics and Poetics of Postcolonial Discourse," Giovanna Covi, Univ. of Trento

For abstracts, visit profs.lingue.univr.it/CaribbeanScottish/INDEX.htm.

Photo(bio)graphies: Collaborative Intersections between Text and Image

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Angeles Donoso Macaya, McDaniel Coll.

1. "Photobiography in France since 1975: New Trends and Strategies," Fabien Arribert-Narce, Univ. of Kent

2. "Secret Agents and State Building after the Mexican Revolution: A Photobiography of My Grandfather," Jose Montelongo, Bard Coll.

3. "Being in Pictures: Self-Reflection in Photo(auto)biography," Joanne Leonard, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

For papers, write to angelesdonoso@go.wustl.edu.

Rhetoric and/of the Job Market

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: Michael F. Bernard-Donals, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Speakers: John Ackerman, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Christine R. Farris, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Wendy Hesford, Ohio State Univ., Columbus; David Laurence, MLA; Roxanne Mountford, Univ. of Kentucky; Patricia Roberts-Miller, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Panelists will examine the state of the job market for PhDs in composition and rhetoric relative to English studies, the relative success on the market of literature students teaching rhetoric and composition (and vice versa), the plaint that rhetoric and composition is a growth field while literature languishes, the nature of academic labor in our field, and the language used to describe openings in the field as symptomatic of larger trends in the academic job market.

Demonstration Interviews for Job Seekers in Foreign Languages

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the ADFL Executive Committee. Presiding: David Goldberg, MLA

Speakers: Susan G. Polansky, Carnegie Mellon Univ.; Ann Marie Rasmussen, Duke Univ.

Demonstration interviews of candidates for positions teaching in foreign languages and literature will be analyzed and critiqued by audience members, interviewers, and interviewees.

Re-membering Milton Twenty-Five Years Later

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Catharine Gray, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Erin A. Murphy, Boston Univ.

Speakers: Ann Baynes Coiro, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Margaret W. Ferguson, Univ. of California, Davis; Feisal G. Mohamed, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Mary Nyquist, Univ. of Toronto; Elliott Visconsi, Univ. of Notre Dame; Christopher Warley, Univ. of Toronto; Reginald A. Wilburn, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

On the twenty-fifth anniversary of Re-membering Milton, this roundtable aims to reconceive the volume's original methodological challenge to Milton studies. Reconsidering the book's diverse critical approaches, we will explore how these contributed to present scholarship and ask how they might inspire new methods that would interrogate or enrich the historicism currently dominating Milton scholarship and literary studies more generally.

For abstracts, write to cathgray@illinois.edu after 1 Dec.

The Webs We Weave: Online Pedagogy in Community Colleges

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Community Colleges. Presiding: Linda Weinhouse, Community Coll. of Baltimore County, MD

1. "Blended Learning: The Best of Both Worlds?" Pamela Sue Hardman, Cuyahoga Community Coll., Western Campus, OH

2. "Magic in the Web," Michael R. Best, Univ. of Victoria; Jeremy Ehrlich, Univ. of Victoria

3. "The Digital-Dialogue Journal: Tool for Enhanced Classic Communication," Bette G. Hirsch, Cabrillo Coll., CA

4. "Delivering Literary Studies in the Twenty-First Century: The Relevance of Online Pedagogies," Kristine Blair, Bowling Green State Univ.

Comparative Conversion

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Medieval Literature. Presiding: Steven F. Kruger, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Religious Selves, Racial Others: Comparative Conversions in Mandeville's Travels and the Islamic Malay Alexander Romance," Su Fang Ng, Univ. of Oklahoma

2. "Resistance Is Futile, You Will Be Assimilated: Exploring Conversionary Fantasies in The Travels of Sir John Mandeville," Leila Norako, Univ. of Rochester

Theorizing Love: Conceptions of Love, Sex, and Desire from Staël to Proust

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Marie-Pierre F. Le Hir, Univ. of Arizona

1. "Le choc 'fatal': L'amour et l'art d'aimer dans Le lys dans la vallée," Maria Gloria Melgarejo, Saint Cloud State Univ.

2. "L'éducation sentimentale: The Incongruities of Passion," Albert Samuel Whisman, Univ. of Oklahoma

3. "Les taupes et l'amour ou la dissociation de l'amour," Vincent Gogibu, Univ. of Montpellier III

4. "Metaphysical Desire and the Time of the Other in Proust," Donald R. Wehrs, Auburn Univ., Auburn

Structures of Experience in The Faerie Queene

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Spenser Society. Presiding: Kenneth Gross, Univ. of Rochester

1. "Beating Up Little Old Ladies: Humor, Allegory, and Spenser's Faerie Queene," Christine Barrett, Harvard Univ.

2. "'A Little Well Is Lent, That Gaineth More Withal': Politicizing Pity in Books 5 and 6 of The Faerie Queene," Richard Lee, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Allegorical Disruption: Spare, Slowed, and Stolen Time in The Faerie Queene," J. K. Barret, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Respondent: Philip Schwyzer, Univ. of Exeter

Teaching Early Literature and Why It Matters

Thursday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robyn Malo, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette; Manushag Powell, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

1. "Entertaining Discord: Medieval Drama in the Modern Classroom," Mary L. Raschko, Mercer Univ.

2. "Commuting with the City Mouse: Aesop's Fables and Academic Commentary," Alex Mueller, Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston

3. "Another Time: The Unfamiliar Eighteenth Century," Christopher Loar, Univ. of California, Davis

Tone in Narrative

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Society for the Study of Narrative. Presiding: Molly Hite, Cornell Univ.

1. "Dialogue, Voice, and Tone; or, Exploring a Neglected Channel of Narrative Communication," James Phelan, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "Taking a Wrong Tone," Debra Fried, Cornell Univ.

3. "Voice, Self, and Tonal Cues in Legal Discourse," Chris Rideout, Seattle Univ. School of Law

The Fight for Public Higher Education

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Association of University Professors. Presiding: Gwendolyn Bradley, American Assn. of University Professors

Speakers: Marc Bousquet, Santa Clara Univ.; Jason B. Jones, Central Connecticut State Univ.; Michelle A. Massé, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge; Robert Samuels, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Christopher Simeone, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Jeffrey J. Williams, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

Public systems of higher education in many states are in crisis, experiencing budget cuts, furloughs, program discontinuance, and attacks on collective bargaining and faculty governance rights. What should/can faculty members and graduate students do?

Defining Form

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 616, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Colleen Rosenfeld, Pomona Coll.

Speakers: Susannah Hollister, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Caroline E. Levine, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Colleen Rosenfeld; Scott A. Trudell, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Henry S. Turner, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

Respondent: Jacqueline D. Wernimont, Scripps Coll.

The study of individual forms has been central to literary criticism of the past century, but scholars have been less interested in defining the concept of form itself. The potential for an inquiry into form has been obscured by a series of polarized debates about the relative importance of formal analysis to cultural studies. Without a sustained attempt to define form, the concept easily doubles as both straw man and rallying cry. This roundtable will ask, "What is form?"

Impossible Plays: The Limits of Modernist (Anti)Theatrical Representation

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Charles J. Del Dotto, Duke Univ.

1. "Phantasmal Intelligences and Alien Minds in The Dynasts," Anna Henchman, Boston Univ.

2. "Yeats's Dance Plays and the Ghostly Pedagogies of Nationhood," Carrie J. Preston, Boston Univ.

3. "Impossible Beckett: Unhaunting the Theater in the Final Stage Plays," Lawrence Switzky, Univ. of Toronto, Mississauga

Queering Value

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Aren Aizura, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

1. "Queer Economies and Speculative Limits," Angela Mitropoulos, Univ. of Western Sydney, Penrith South

2. "Sovereign Debt, Queer Remainders," Travis Sands, Univ. of Washington, Bothell

3. "Family Value(s)," Craig Willse, Coll. of Wooster

4. "Necrocapital: AIDS, Affective Accumulation, and Viral Labor," Eric Stanley, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

For abstracts, write to aren.aizura@gmail.com.

Americanism, Nativism, and/or Xenophobia in Midwestern Literature

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature. Presiding: Marilyn Judith Atlas, Ohio Univ., Athens

1. "Under the Red, White, and Blue: Americanism, Nativism, and Anti-Semitism in The Professor's House, The Great Gatsby, and The Sun Also Rises," John Rohrkemper, Elizabethtown Coll.

2. "Willa Cather's Evolving Counternativism: From My Ántonia to The Professor's House," Julianne Newmark, New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Tech.

3. "Dawn Powell's Dance Night and Midwestern Small-Town Poison," Marilyn Judith Atlas

Business Meeting of the North American Heine Society

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Presiding: Jocelyne Kolb, Smith Coll.

"Reading Heine in the Context of Modern Jewish Anti-Catholicism," Ari Joskowicz, Vanderbilt Univ.

Josephine A. Roberts Forum: "Words and Music: How the Elizabethans Knew the Psalms"

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Renaissance English Text Society. Presiding: Margaret P. Hannay, Siena Coll.

1. "The Holy Ghost, the People, and the Editor," Beth Quitslund, Ohio Univ.

2. "The Psalm Tunes: Spur or Drag?" Nicholas Temperley, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Respondent: Susan M. Felch, Calvin Coll.

The Opera Libretto

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Lyrica Society for Word-Music Relations. Presiding: Jeff Dailey, Five Towns Coll.

1. "Staging Authority--Ariosto, Early Opera, and the Society of Dead Poets," Edward Anderson, Rice Univ.

2. "English Verse Translations of Die Zauberflöte: Auden and Kallman versus McClatchy," Matthew Paul Carlson, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "Encountering the Mirror in 'The Birthday of the Infanta' and Der Zwerg," Ryan Kangas, Univ. of Houston

For abstracts, visit www.lyricasociety.org/.

History: Discipline or Counterscience?

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Kirkland, Sheraton

Program arranged by the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism. Presiding: Tilottama Rajan, Univ. of Western Ontario

1. "Undisciplined Histories," Deborah Elise White, Emory Univ.

2. "The 'Discipline' of History: Kantian Prophecy and Counterscience," Christopher Bundock, Duke Univ.

3. "Squandering: Schelling and the Fossil Record," Jason Martin Wirth, Seattle Univ.

Christianity and the Literature of the Global South

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Conference on Christianity and Literature. Presiding: Mary-Anne Lee Vetterling, Regis Coll., MA

1. "Maternal Matrix: Hope on the Far Side of Adversity," Diane Dixon, Grove City Coll.

2. "The Virgin of Guadalupe: A Miracle at the Service of the Spanish Empire," Mina García Soormally, Elon Univ.

3. "Contentions in the House of Chloe: Global North versus Global South in Toni Morrison's Tar Baby and Paradise," Walter Hesford, Univ. of Idaho

4. "Not Rivals, God and I: Purple Hibiscus and the Paradoxes of Postcolonial Faith," Cynthia Wallace, Loyola Univ., Chicago

Satire's Double-Edged Irony: Self-Satire and the Control of the Satirical Object

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Humor Studies Association. Presiding: Sharon D. McCoy, Univ. of Georgia

1. "'The National Joker' and the 'Stealing Back and Forth of Symbols,'" Todd Nathan Thompson, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "The Cubies' ABC and the Modernist Debt to Antimodernist Satire," Eric Rettberg, Univ. of Virginia

3. "Marianne Moore's Empathetic Satires," Rachel V. Trousdale, Agnes Scott Coll.

For abstracts, visit www.slu.edu/academic/ahsa/papers.htm.

Renaissance Oceans

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Literature and the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry and Prose. Presiding: Lisa Voigt, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

1. "Mixtures and Monsters: The Ribera Confusa of Góngora's Soledades," Nicholas Parmley, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "Narrative Sea Changes," Laurence N. de Looze, Univ. of Western Ontario

3. "Transoceanic Malay: Diplomacy, Mercantilism, and Translingual Exchanges in Early Modern Aceh," Su Fang Ng, Univ. of Oklahoma

Pre-Raphaelite Audiences: Artists, Critics, Readers

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the William Morris Society and the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. Presiding: Greg Barnhisel, Duquesne Univ.

1. "Inventing Rossetti: Biographies as Reception," Julie Codell, Arizona State Univ.

2. "Oscar Wilde as Pre-Raphaelite Reader," Linda H. Peterson, Yale Univ.

3. "The Authorial Presence of William Morris in Victorian Periodical Culture," Yuri A. Cowan, Ghent Univ.

4. "Pre-Raphaelite Audiences on the Continent: The Dutch Case," Anne van Buul, Univ. of Groningen

For abstracts, visit www.morrissociety.org after 1 Nov.

Destruction

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature and the Division on Philosophical Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Steven L. Miller, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "Deconstructive Ethics and Its Psychoanalytic Supplement," Kelly Oliver, Vanderbilt Univ.

2. "No Judgment: Giorgio Agamben and the Destruction of Aesthetics," Roland Végsö, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

3. "Translating Destruction: Daive, Celan, Creeley," John Steen, Emory Univ.

Graphic Narratives Retelling History: Germany

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures and the Division on European Literary Relations. Presiding: Ema Vyroubalova, Trinity Coll., Dublin

1. "Sequential Berlin: Jason Lutes's City of Stones Series," Ksenia Sidorenko, Yale Univ.

2. "Retelling History in the Borderlands: Jaroslav Rudiš's Alois Nebel and Bomber by Jaromír 99," Martha B. Kuhlman, Bryant Univ.

3. "Retelling German History with the Graphic Novel," Elizabeth Nijdam, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

For abstracts, visit mlaslavicdivision2012.blogspot.com/.

Italian Gender Studies in the New Millennium

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Italian Literature. Presiding: Francesca G. Parmeggiani, Fordham Univ., Bronx

1. "Sandro Penna and the Performance of Homosexuality," John Gerard Champagne, Penn State Univ., Erie-Behrend

2. "The Queering of the Rainbow: Color, Class, and Sexual Identity in La finestra di fronte," Ryan Calabretta-Sajder, Rice Univ.

3. "Migrant as Metaphor? Fictions of Outsiderness in Contemporary Queer Writing," Christopher Atwood, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Deep Drawings: Sociopolitical Themes in Anime and Manga

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Joshua Paul Dale, Tokyo Gakugei Univ.

1. "Alternative Manga Magazines in Postwar Japanese Comics: Garo and COM," CJ Suzuki, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "Subversive Cute: The Other Serious Anime and Manga," Kerin Ogg, Wayne State Univ.

3. "Current-Affairs Comics in a Global Context: The Comic Heart of Darkness," Marie Thorsten, Doshisha Univ.

Respondent: Joshua Paul Dale

Beyond the Arabian Nights: Middle Eastern Fiction in the World Literature Course

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Barish Ali, State Univ. of New York, Buffalo State Coll.

1. "The Egyptian Voice in the American Classroom: Teaching Si Sayyid and Zaki Bey as Cultural Icons," Katherine Dillion, Harding Univ.

2. "One Thousand and One Nights Meets Sex and the City: An Approach to Teaching Rajaa Al-Sanea's Girls of Riyadh," Jana Fedtke, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

3. "Teaching the Middle East: Cross-Literary Encounters," Sevinc Turkkan, State Univ. of New York, Brockport

4. "Middle East Literatures in the Paradigm of World Literature," Firat Oruc, Northwestern Univ.

Betrayal and the Function of the Humanities within the University

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Karen Pinkus, Cornell Univ.

1. "The Betrayal of Translation," Davide Stimilli, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

2. "The Fifth Commandment; or, The Ethical Necessity of Betrayal in Kleist's 'The Foundling,'" Richard Owen Block, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "Uncanny Betrayals: Disclosure and Novelistic Form in the Texts of Zoë Wicomb," Michael du Plessis, Univ. of Southern California

For abstracts, write to blockr@u.washington.edu.

Between the Singular and the Universal: Remembering Post/Revolutionary Haiti

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Chris Bongie, Queen's Univ.

1. "Testifying the Haitian Revolution: The Baron de Vastey's Testimonio," Marlene Daut, Claremont Graduate Univ.

2. "From Universal Emancipation to Antislavery in One State: Vastey and the Contradictions of Haitian Independence," Nick Nesbitt, Princeton Univ.

3. "Auditing the Horrors: Vastey and the Challenges of Post/Revolutionary Humanitarianism," Chris Bongie

For abstracts, visit www.queensu.ca/english/bongie.html.

Digital Humanities and Hispanism

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Kyra A. Kietrys, Davidson Coll.

Speakers: Mike Blum, Coll. of William and Mary; Francie Cate-Arries, Coll. of William and Mary; Kyra A. Kietrys; Kathy Korcheck, Central Coll.; William Anthony Nericcio, San Diego State Univ.; Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Michigan State Univ.; Amaranta Saguar García, Univ. of Oxford, Lady Margaret Hall; David A. Wacks, Univ. of Oregon

Demonstrations by Hispanists who use technology in their scholarship and teaching. The presenters include a graduate student; junior and senior Latin American, Peninsular, and comparativist colleagues whose work spans medieval to contemporary times; and an academic technologist. After brief presentations of the different digital tools, the audience will circulate among the stations to participate in interactive demonstrations.

For abstracts and Web links, write to kykietrys@davidson.edu.

Jimi Hendrix and the Poetics of Song

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jacob Wilkenfeld, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Dancing in Dylan’s Head: Jimi Hendrix and the Folk Tradition," Jeffrey Carroll, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

2. "Jimi Hendrix and the Politics of Blackness," Daniel Barlow, Univ. of Pittsburgh

3. "Voodoo Child: Jimi Hendrix and the African American Experimental Tradition," Michael New, Penn State Univ., University Park

4. "Are You Experienced? Jimi Hendrix and the Poetics of Black Experience," Jacob Wilkenfeld

Transpacific Formalisms of the Mid-Twentieth Century

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Colleen Lye, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Following the Hobo’s Brush: Tani Jōji’s Transpacific Zuihitsu," Andrew Way Leong, Northwestern Univ.

2. "Literary Information Warfare: Eileen Chang in Hong Kong, 1955," Richard Jean So, Univ. of Chicago

3. "Transpacific Translations of Japanese and American Empires," Nayoung Aimee Kwon, Duke Univ.

Respondent: Shu-mei Shih, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

For abstracts, write to richardjeanso@uchicago.edu.

Socially Engaged Poetry in Twenty-First-Century Spain

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. Presiding: Sharon Keefe Ugalde, Texas State Univ., San Marcos

1. "Poemas críticos de Isabel Pérez Montalbán, María-Eloy García y David González," Marina A. Llorente, Saint Lawrence Univ.

2. "Market Volatility, Materiality, and Violence in Pablo García Casado's Dinero," Paul Cahill, Pomona Coll.

3. "Representaciones y retos de lesbianas: Poesía entrometida en la España del siglo XXI," Elena Castro, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

4. "As terceiras mullers en la poesía de María do Cebreiro y Yolanda Castaño," Silvia Bermúdez, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Folklore and Literature of the Iraq War

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Folklore and Literature. Presiding: Jacqueline McGrath, Coll. of DuPage, IL

1. "Filmmaking in Iraq: A Rebirth?" Mary Erickson, Univ. of Oregon

2. "Heteroglossic Iraq: Voices of Women and War," Kimberly Wedeven Segall, Seattle Pacific Univ.

3. "The Iraq War in Film and Literature," Jacqueline McGrath

For abstracts, write to mcgrathj@cod.edu.

Open Session of the Division on Old English Language and Literature

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 608, WSCC

Presiding: Paul L. Acker, Saint Louis Univ.

1. "Not the Usual Singularity: Old English Strong-Adjective Endings for Weak," Mary Blockley, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "Visualizing Femininity in Children’s and Illustrated Versions of Beowulf," Bruce D. Gilchrist, Concordia Univ.

3. "Cynewulf and Cyneheard: The Reception History," Thomas D. Hill, Cornell Univ.

Open Session of the Division on German Literature to 1700

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Presiding: Kathryn Starkey, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Heroes in the Living Room: Visual Narrative and Constructing Identity in the Runkelstein Wigalois Frescoes," James H. Brown, Univ. of Kansas

2. "Love of/and Similitude: Conceptualizations of Love in the First Book of Parzival," Emina Mušanovic, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Reading in the Nuremberg Carnival Plays," Ann Marie Rasmussen, Duke Univ.

Activism in the Academy: Generational, Historical, and Theoretical Perspectives

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession. Presiding: Coppélia Kahn, Brown Univ.

Speakers: Arlene R. Keizer, Univ. of California, Irvine; Ellen Lee McCallum, Michigan State Univ.; Catharine R. Stimpson, New York Univ.; Lisa Surwillo, Stanford Univ.

We often hear that the academy has been "feminized," but what does that really mean? What can we learn from activists of the previous four decades? How can women today make the university a more democratic and gender-equal place? Has feminism become another "f-word" on our campuses? Is feminist research rewarded? When women spend extra effort on teaching, is it rewarded? Where are the opportunities and what are the challenges for women working to change the academy?

New Readings in Brazilian Popular Culture

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature. Presiding: Emanuelle K. F. Oliveira, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "Cordel do Fogo Encantado and the (Im)Possibility of a (Post)Modern Sertão," Kirsten Marie Ernst, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Charting the Gendered Spaces of Citizenship in Tata Amaral's Antonia," Leila Maria Lehnen, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

3. "Strange Worlds: Zé do Caixão and the Powers of Horror," Robin Peery, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

4. "Tweeting Aphorisms in Brazil," Isis McElroy, Arizona State Univ.

For abstracts, write to emanuelle.oliveira@vanderbilt.edu after 15 Dec.

How to Search the MLA International Bibliography like an Expert

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography. Presiding: Gary M. Godfrey, Weber State Univ.

"MLA Bibliography Editor Offers Advice," Barbara Chen, MLA

Transnational Lives

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing. Presiding: Julie Rak, Univ. of Alberta

1. "Eichmann in Jerusalem and Eichmann in America: The Place of Life Narratives in the Lives of Nations," Cynthia Franklin, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

2. "Transnational and Translational: T. E. Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom," Mary Bryden, Reading Univ.

3. "Autobiography in Fragments: Dubravka Ugresic and a Transnational Public Intellectual," Eva C. Karpinski, York Univ.

4. "Mediated Subjectivities in Child Soldier Narratives," Jessica Roberts, Queen's Univ.

Native Space: Indigenous North American Geographies before 1800

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on American Literature to 1800. Presiding: Jean O'Brien, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

1. "Captive Geographies," Lisa Brooks, Harvard Univ.

2. "Tantaque's Tortoise: A Welikia Story," Andrew Newman, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York

3. "The Xam Kwatcan and the Indigenous Spaces of Early California," Phillip Round, Univ. of Iowa

4. "Unsettling the Southeast," Kathryn Walkiewicz, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Respondent: Matt Cohen, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Reading Langston Hughes in the Age of Barack Obama

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the Langston Hughes Society. Presiding: Sharon Lynette Jones, Wright State Univ.

1. "Invisible Hughes: Barack Obama's 2008 Democratic National Convention Acceptance Speech," W. Jason Miller, North Carolina State Univ.

2. "Postmodern, Postracial African American Radicalism: Reading The Big Sea in Obama's Nation," Nathaniel Mills, California State Univ., Northridge

3. "'In Search of Sun': Self-Fashioning in the Autobiographies of Langston Hughes and Barack Obama," Andrew Yerkes, Nanyang Technological Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.langstonhughessociety.org.

Current Research in Sixteenth-Century French Studies

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: George P. Hoffmann, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1. "Montaigne, Justus Lipsius, and the Inconstant Self," Hassan Melehy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Alexander at Home: Montaigne's Domestic Masculinity," Alison Calhoun, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "Death, Resurrection, and the Anatomy of Epistemon in François Rabelais's Pantagruel," Dorothea Heitsch, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

4. "A Passion for Mourning: Functions of the Chorus in Sixteenth-Century French Tragedy," Antonia Szabari, Univ. of Southern California

Translating and Translation in Israeli Literature

Friday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Hebrew Literature. Presiding: Adriana X. Jacobs, Yale Univ.

1. "Reading Wilde in Warsaw: The Interfaith Implications of a Hebrew Translation," Hannah Pressman, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Hebrew-Speaking Nazis: The Ethics of (Intra-textual) Translation in Holocaust Fiction," Or Rogovin, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "The Place of Translation: Maya Arad's Family Pictures," Adriana X. Jacobs

The Presidential Forum: Language, Literature, Learning

Friday, 10:15 a.m.–12:00 noon, Metropolitan A, Sheraton

Presiding: Russell A. Berman, Stanford Univ.

1. "Networking the Field," Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA

2. "Of Degraded Tongues and Digital Talk: Race and the Politics of Language," Imani Perry, Princeton Univ.

3. "Learning to Unlearn," Judith Halberstam, Univ. of Southern California

4. "Borrowing Privileges: Dreaming in Foreign Tongues," Bala Venkat Mani, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

5. "Teaching Literature and the Bitter Truth about Starbucks," Christopher Freeburg, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

The forum addresses three fundamental points of orientation for our profession: language, in its various materialities; literature, broadly understood; and learning, especially student learning and our educational missions. The language and literature classroom has to serve the needs of today’s students. How do changing understandings of identity, performance, and media translate into transformations in teaching and learning?

For linked sessions, see meetings 283 and 431 and 527.

From Car Culture to the Apocalypse: Northwest Folklore

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Folklore Society. Presiding: Gordon Mitchell Sayre, Univ. of Oregon

1. "The Humanity of the Car," Gordon Mitchell Sayre

2. "Airstream Dreams: Northwest Travel Trailer Culture," Camilla Henriette Mortensen, Lane Community Coll., OR

3. "Placing the Postapocalypse: Exploring Postapocalyptic Representations of the Pacific Northwest," Martina Miles, Univ. of Oregon

José Saramago: World Writer, Writer of the World

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Portuguese Studies Association

1. "Lisbon Stinks: A Reading of José Saramago's O ano da morte de Ricardo Reis," Sophia Beal, Tulane Univ.

2. "José Saramago's Aesthetics of Quotation in The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis," Anita Melo, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "Ethics in Saramago," Daniel Ares Lopez, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Home and the Domestic: Virginia Woolf and Doris Lessing

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Virginia Woolf Society and the Doris Lessing Society. Presiding: Suzette Ann Henke, Univ. of Louisville

1. "The Grass Passes," Dorian Stuber, Hendrix Coll.

2. "'Foreign Bodies': Disunity at the Woolfian Domestic Dinner Party," Lauren Rich, Univ. of Notre Dame

3. "Home and Family in Virginia Woolf and Doris Lessing: A Foucauldian Approach," Yuan-Jung Cheng, National Sun Yat-Sen Univ.

Mind, Body, and Performance: Cognitive Approaches to Theater and Drama

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Theatre and Drama Society. Presiding: Odai Johnson, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Pain, Performance, Presence, Performativity," Ryan M. Claycomb, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

2. "Staging Distributed Cognition: Anna Deavere Smith's Documentary Theater and the New American Conception of Self," Amy Cook, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "The Thinking Skin: Syncopation and Affect in Performance," Sarah Guthu, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

4. "Somaesthetics and Women of the Stage in Seventeenth-Century Spain," Elizabeth Petersen, Florida Atlantic Univ.

USA Cervantes

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Cervantes Society of America. Presiding: Adrienne L. Martín, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "Don Quixote and the American Imaginary," Bruce R. Burningham, Illinois State Univ.

2. "Feminism and Postfeminism in Cervantes," Anne J. Cruz, Univ. of Miami

3. "Cervantes in Twenty-First-Century United States Theater," Eduardo Olid Guerrero, Muhlenberg Coll.

Hawthorne and Myth

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 607, WSCC

Program arranged by the Nathaniel Hawthorne Society. Presiding: Richard Kopley, Penn State Univ., DuBois

1. "Hawthorne's Carnivalesque Humanism: The Fall-of-Man Myth in 'Young Goodman Brown' and 'The Maypole of Merry Mount,'" Adam Pridemore, Univ. of South Florida

2. "'Sprouting from the Earth': Hawthorne's Racialized Classicism," Richard Hardack, Berkeley, CA

3. "Puget Sound (Re)Writes New England: The Postfrontier Civic Myth in Ella Rhoads Higginson's Revision of The Scarlet Letter," Laura Laffrado, Western Washington Univ.

Corporate Humanities

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Zahi A. Zalloua, Whitman Coll.

1. "Detecting Human Life in the Corporate Universe," Donald Hedrick, Kansas State Univ.

2. "What Do Students Need from the Humanities?" Karin J. Gosselink, Yale Univ.

3. "Are the Humanities Worth Saving?" Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Univ. of Houston, Victoria

Respondent: Uppinder Mehan, Univ. of Houston, Victoria

For papers, visit societyforcriticalexchange.org after 1 Dec.

Margaret Atwood's Apocalyptical Visions

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Margaret Atwood Society. Presiding: Tomoko Kuribayashi, Univ. of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

1. "'It Was Zero Hour, You Said Be Brave': Tracing Atwood's Apocalypses," Karma Waltonen, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "'Apocalypse Coiled in My Tongue': Apocalyptic Vision in Margaret Atwood's Poetry," Lauren Rule Maxwell, The Citadel

3. "Atwood's 'Last Man' Novels: Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood," Kathryn VanSpanckeren, Univ. of Tampa

4. "'The Postmodern Condition' as Apocalypse in Atwood's Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood," Debrah K. Raschke, Southeast Missouri State Univ.

Performativity versus Theatricality

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society. Presiding: Robert L. A. Clark, Kansas State Univ.

Speakers: Garrett P. J. Epp, Univ. of Alberta; Mario Longtin, Univ. of Western Ontario; Ineke Murakami, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Jefferey H. Taylor, Metropolitan State Coll. of Denver

Performativity has become a key concept in literary studies of the medieval and early modern periods, but its relationship to the theater is ill defined. This roundtable brings together specialists of French and English medieval and early modern theater to examine the application of these critical terms to early drama. Aspects to be discussed include rhetoric, tensions about feigning or counterfeiting of the self, anthropological considerations, and queer performativity.

The Americas, the Metropolis, and Galdós

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature and the International Association of Galdós Scholars. Presiding: Mary L. Coffey, Pomona Coll.

1. "Cuba en los Episodios galdosianos," Dolores Troncoso, Univ. of Vigo

2. "Galdosian Realism in Argentina: The Influence of Galdós's Doña Perfecta on Manuel Gálvez's Perdido en su noche," Laura Connor, Harvard Univ.

3. "Galdós and Fuentes: National Realism, Fantasy, and the Centering of a Novelistic World," Stephen John Miller, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

The Languages of Hospitality in Literature

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Melissa Lam, Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong

1. "'A Meal Pleasantly Set': Whitman's 'Domestic' Hospitality," Puspa Damai, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. "Hospitable Conversions and the Epistemology of Property in John Eliot's Indian Dialogues," Jenny Elizabeth Braun, Univ. of Virginia

3. "'Of Savages and Settlers': Hospitality in the Emerging Nation-State," Melissa Lam

Exploring Early Modern Geographies

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Society for German Renaissance and Baroque Literature. Presiding: Bethany Wiggin, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Faust's Educational Travels: Reading the Parts That Were Copied," Paul Meyer, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "Mapping Masculinities: Negotiating Bodies, Ethnicity, and Politics," Benjamin Davis, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

3. "The Jesuit Discovery of Northern Mexico during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," Albrecht Classen, Univ. of Arizona

Digital South, Digital Futures

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Southern Literature and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Vincent J. Brewton, Univ. of North Alabama

1. "Documenting the American South," Natalia Smith, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Space, Place, and Image: Mapping Farm Securities Administration (FSA) Photographs and the Photogrammar Project," Lauren Tilton, Yale Univ.

3. "Southern Spaces: The Development of a Digital Southern Studies Journal," Frances Abbott, Emory Univ.

4. "Mapping a New Deal for New Orleans Artists," Michael Mizell-Nelson, Univ. of New Orleans

For abstracts, visit http://ach.org/ach-sessions-2012-mla-convention after 20 Dec.

Secret Asian Man: Martin Wong's Influence across Culture and Medium in 1980s New York City

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 303, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Roy Perez, Willamette Univ.

1. "The Queer Excesses of Martin Wong's Nuyorico: Love in the Piñero Portraits," Roy Perez

2. "Blasians: Martin Wong, Berry Gordy's Last Dragon, and NYC Hip-Hop's Afro-Orientalism," Shante Paradigm Smalls, New York Univ.

3. "Nuyorican Consciousness and Martin Wong's Queer Puerto Rican Flags," Lawrence M. La Fountain–Stokes, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Respondent: Josh Takano Chambers-Letson, Northwestern Univ.

Reconfiguring the Scholarly Editor: Textual Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Míceál Vaughan, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Neither Editor nor Librarian: The Interventions Required in the New Context of Texts in the Digital World," Joseph Tennis, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Revealing a Coronation Tribute: Decoding the Hidden Aural and Visual Symbols," JoAnn Taricani, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "Mapping Editors," Meg Roland, Marylhurst Univ.

4. "The Editor as Curator: Early Histories of Collected Works Editions in English," Jeffrey Knight, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Romanticism and Religion

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Keats-Shelley Association of America. Presiding: Jasper Cragwall, Loyola Univ., Chicago

1. "Charlotte Smith, Toleration, and the Novel's Progress," Mark E. Canuel, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

2. "Coleridge at Sea," Colin Lovell Jager, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "Religion and Sociability in Cosmopolitan Calcutta, 1817–31," Daniel E. White, Univ. of Toronto

Idealisms: Christian, Classical, Utopian

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. Presiding: Linda L. Carroll, Tulane Univ.

1. "Beyond the Rungs of Saturn: Dante in Translation in Paradiso XXII," James Carson Nohrnberg, Univ. of Virginia

2. "Pier Paolo Vergerio and the Ideal Pedagogy at the Carrarese Court," Michele Rossi, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Compromised Utopia: The Comedies of gli Intronati of Siena," Laurie Shepard, Boston Coll.

Literature, Gender, and the Press: Around and beyond George Sand

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the George Sand Association and Women in French. Presiding: Catherine M. J. Nesci, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

1. "Après George Sand: Être une femme journaliste dans la presse d'opinion," Marie-Eve Thérenty, Univ. of Montpellier III

2. "'My Twin Sister': George Sand, Lydia Maria Child, and the Epistolary Journalistic Essay," Charlene Avallone, Kailua, HI

3. "Mother and Daughter: Le journal des demoiselles and the Fashioning of Female Accomplishment," Susan Elizabeth Hiner, Vassar Coll.

4. "Writing on Writing: Book Reviews in Women's Periodicals of the Early July Monarchy," Cheryl Ainley Morgan, Hamilton Coll.

For abstracts, bibliographies, and a description of the panel, visit www.hofstra.edu/georgesand.

Temporality of Fairy Tales in Postwar and Postunification Germany

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Lorely Elsa French, Pacific Univ.

1. "Love as Real Wealth: DEFA Fairy-Tale Models," Qinna Shen, Loyola Univ., Baltimore

2. "Postsocialist Fairy-Tale Films," Benita Blessing, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

3. "Rafik Schami's Tales about Fairy Tales," Dorothee Ostmeier, Univ. of Oregon

Respondent: Jack D. Zipes, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

For papers, write to qinnashen@gmail.com after 23 Dec.

The Afterlife of Philip Sidney: A Model of Poesy

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: John M. Webster, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Model across Disciplines: Sidney's Presence in Hilliard's Art of Limning," Bi-qi Beatrice Lei, National Taiwan Univ.

2. "The Art of Poesy: William Scot's Speaking Pictures," Hannah Crumme, Univ. of London, King's Coll.

3. "Philip Sidney's Death and the Protestant Ars Moriendi," Todd A. Borlik, Bloomsburg Univ.

Translation and Disciplinarity

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Cristina Bacchilega, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

1. "Translation as Method," Subramanian Shankar, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

2. "Translating the Economic," S. Charusheela, Univ. of Washington, Bothell

3. "Translating the Literary," Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, Univ. of California, Irvine

For abstracts, write to subraman@hawaii.edu.

Michael Field and the Arts

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Florence S. Boos, Univ. of Iowa

1. "Stone Venus," Richard Menke, Univ. of Georgia

2. "'No Place on Earth': The Theater, the 'Fan,' and the Plays of 'Michael Field,'" Sharon Bickle, Univ. of Queensland

3. "Dancing with Michael Field," Cheryl Wilson, Univ. of Baltimore

4. "The Wagnerian Field," Donna S. Parsons, Univ. of Iowa

Critical Healing: Queer and Disability Studies Interventions in Biomedicine and Public Health

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science. Presiding: Rebecca Garden, State Univ. of New York, Upstate Medical Univ.

1. "Culture as Prevention: Contemporary Representations of HIV/AIDS," Marty Fink, Concordia Univ.

2. "Queer Theory and Biomedical Practice: New Junctures among Science-Sexuality-Culture," William J. Spurlin, Brunel Univ., London

3. "Activism and the 'Collective Sick': Disability and Group Identity in Indra Sinha's Animal's People," Stephanie Yorke, Univ. of Oxford

For abstracts, visit http://criticalhealing.blogspot.com/.

West Asia and the World Literature Debate (session canceled)

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on West Asian Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Stephen Sheehi, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

1. "Can West Asia Help Arabic Find a Place in World Literature?" Michelle Hartman, McGill Univ.

2. "Ignorance Attempting to Correct Itself: From Bedford Anthology to African Books Collective," John Franklin Crawford, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

Respondent: Stephen Sheehi

Hemispheric Americas, Transnational Crossings

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. Presiding: John Burt Foster, George Mason Univ.

1. "'The Most Expensive Piece of Fish You'll Ever Buy'; or, A Short Detour through Brazil: The Deviousness of Language," David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford Univ.

2. "Sexual Boundaries: Sexuality, Violence, and Postmodern Play in Caribbean Neo–Slave Narratives," Sam Vásquez, Dartmouth Coll.

3. "Hemispheric Letradas: Gender, the Mexican Revolution, and Transnational Critique on the United States–Mexico Border," Yolanda Padilla, Univ. of Pennsylvania

4. "Dictatorship, Diaspora, and the Fantasy of Justice: Intersections of Insurgence in Héctor Tobar's The Tattooed Soldier," Jennifer Harford Vargas, Bryn Mawr Coll.

Open Hearing of the MLA Delegate Assembly

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 309, WSCC

Presiding: Members of the Delegate Assembly Organizing Committee

Jewish American Literature: The Pacific Rim

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Jewish American Literature. Presiding: Monica Osborne, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Trickster Reads Midrash: Theories toward an Ontology of Story," Sol Neely, Univ. of Alaska, Juneau

2. "Illness and Assimilation in Emma Wolf's California," Jennifer S. Tuttle, Univ. of New England

3. "Jewish Diaspora and Indigenous Identity in Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union," Christopher Schedler, Central Washington Univ.

For abstracts, write to mrosborne@ucla.edu.

Between Colonial Literature and History

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Colonial Latin American Literatures. Presiding: Rolena Adorno, Yale Univ.

1. "Canon and Civil Law in the Historical Conception of Bartolomé de las Casas's Historia de las Indias," Jose Cardenas Bunsen, Bucknell Univ.

2. "Afro-Amerindian Historical Agency and Discursive Difficulty in Miguel Cabello Balboa's Descripción de la Provincia de Esmeraldas (1583)," Rubén Sánchez-Godoy, Southern Methodist Univ.

3. "Archival Foundations of Indigenous Chronicle Writing: Guaman Poma's Nueva corónica y buen gobierno," John D. Charles, Tulane Univ.

4. "Sor María de Jesús de Agreda: A Numinous Nun in the Archive," Anna Nogar, Univ. of New Mexico

MoMLA: From Panel to Gallery

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grand A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Writing. Presiding: Victor J. Vitanza, Clemson Univ.

Speakers: Sarah J. Arroyo, California State Univ., Long Beach; Geoffrey V. Carter, Saginaw Valley State Univ.; Anthony Collamati, Clemson Univ.; Jason Helms, Univ. of Kentucky; Justin Hodgson, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Virginia Kuhn, Univ. of Southern California; Bonnie Lenore Kyburz, Utah Valley Univ.; Robert Leston, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York

Instead of a diachronic set of presentations, this panel offers a synchronic set, in an art e-gallery format, arranged separately as conceptual art installations. Presenters and audience will mix as if at a gallery opening, speaking of the works among themselves. The purpose is to show and demonstrate how digital technologies can reshape our views of conferences, of presentations, and of what is now called writings.

The Lost Years: African American Literature and Culture, 1940–60

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Black American Literature and Culture. Presiding: Ayesha Hardison, Ohio Univ., Athens

1. "The Beginning of Plan B: Chester Himes, Malcolm X, and the Foreign Ground of Literary Black Nationalism," Lawrence Jackson, Emory Univ.

2. "About Face: Portraiture, Celebrity, and African American Authorship during the 1940s and 1950s," Jacqueline D. Goldsby, Yale Univ.

3. "Sympathy and Privacy in the Postwar African American White-Life Novel," John C. Charles, North Carolina State Univ.

For abstracts, write to hardison@ohio.edu.

Prosthetic or Aesthetic Re-visioning? Disability in African Literature and Film

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on African Literatures. Presiding: Patrick Muana, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

1. "Critiquing Ableism? Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart," Christopher Becker Krentz, Univ. of Virginia

2. "Eyesight and Insight: Representing the Blind in Lenin al-Ramli's A Point of View," Hala Ghoneim, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "When Wounds Become Scars: 'Aesthetic Nervousness' and Long-Term Injury in Cultural Responses to the Genocide in Rwanda," Zoe Norridge, Univ. of York

Respondent: Ato Quayson, Univ. of Toronto

Nonfiction Prose Experiments

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Nonfiction Prose Studies, Excluding Biography and Autobiography. Presiding: Linda Camarasana, Coll. at Old Westbury, State Univ. of New York

1. "Margaret Fuller's Intertexts," Kimberly S. Engber, Wichita State Univ.

2. "In Contact: Reading Virginia Woolf and Eve Sedgwick Together," Robin M. Hackett, Univ. of New Hampshire, Portsmouth

3. "Burmese Days and The Pargiters: Experiments in Nonficton," Sonam Singh, Cornell Univ.

4. "H.D.'s The Sword Went Out to Sea and the Question of Genre," Lara E. Vetter, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

The Limits of the Human

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Lewis C. Seifert, Brown Univ.

1. "Singeries baroques," Francis B. Assaf, Univ. of Georgia

2. "Riding Descartes's Theoretical Horse," Harriet Stone, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

3. "The Elephant Men," Katherine M. Ibbett, University Coll. London

Remixing Present-Day English

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Present-Day English Language. Presiding: Dulce M. Estevez, Arizona State Univ.

1. "A Critical Analysis of Language Use Constructs in Discourses Related to Language Education in South Texas, 2000–10," Nils Olov Fors, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Agog or a Gag? Lady Gaga's Remixes Remixed," Jennifer M. Santos, Virginia Military Inst.

3. "Mixteando Languages in the United States," Dulce M. Estevez

4. "Remixing English to Represent Trauma and Identity," Sarah Catherine Dean, Arizona State Univ.

Community-Based Writing and Research in and beyond First-Year Composition

Friday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Council of Writing Program Administrators. Presiding: Elenore Long, Arizona State Univ.

1. "Resisting the Commodification of Community: Ethical Approaches to Sustainable Community-Based Writing Partnerships," Andrea Malouf, Salt Lake Community Coll., UT

2. "Community-Based Writing Research: Invigorating the Liberal Arts Tradition by Documenting and Testing Rhetorical Invention under Transnational New Capitalism," Jennifer Clifton, Arizona State Univ.; Elenore Long

3. "Partnerships in Multilingual Rhetorics," Elizabeth Kimball, Drew Univ.

4. "The Decline of the Nation-State and the Problem of Real Audiences: Recovering a Collective Knowledge Project in Community-Based Writing," Noah Roderick, Columbus State Univ.

Cash Bar and Luncheon Arranged by the Wordsworth-Coleridge Association

Friday, Cash bar at 11:30 a.m. and luncheon at 12:00 noon, Rock Bottom Brewery, 1333 Fifth Ave.

For reservations, send $30, payable to The Wordsworth Circle, to Jonathan Farina by 20 Dec.

Revising Donne

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the John Donne Society. Presiding: Margaret Ann Maurer, Colgate Univ.

1. "Donne and Rhapsody," Piers Brown, Univ. of York

2. "Revising Donne in Manuscript and Print," Tracy McLawhorn, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

3. "'Cribrated and Recribrated and Post-Cribrated': The Revisionist Contributions of the Oxford Edition of the Sermons of John Donne," Peter E. McCullough, Univ. of Oxford, Lincoln Coll.

A Creative Conversation: David Shields with Jessica Burstein

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 607, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Jessica Burstein, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Speaker: David Shields, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

David Shields, author of the internationally acclaimed Reality Hunger: A Manifesto, The Thing about Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead, and Enough about You: Notes toward the New Autobiography, discusses his ongoing attempt to obliterate distinctions between fiction and nonfiction, overturn the laws regarding appropriation, and create new forms for the twenty-first century.

Wharton at 150

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Edith Wharton Society. Presiding: Gary Totten, North Dakota State Univ.

1. "What the Archives Suggest," Irene C. Goldman-Price, Great Barrington, MA

2. "Conrad's 'Très cher maître,'" Rita Bode, Trent Univ.

3. "'Actuality and Changefulness': Narrative Ending as Performative Frame in Edith Wharton's 'Confession' and Kate Spain," Stephanie Miller, Univ. of York

For abstracts, write to gary.totten@ndsu.edu.

Rethinking the Category of Love: Cognition, Emotion, and Biopolitics

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Middle English Language and Literature, Excluding Chaucer. Presiding: Glenn D. Burger, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York; Marilynn R. Desmond, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

Speakers: Christian Beck, Univ. of Central Florida; Holly Crocker, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia; Aranye Fradenburg, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Wan-Chuan Kao, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Sarah Powrie, Saint Thomas More Coll.

In addressing the long and significant critical history concerning love in the Middle Ages, this roundtable will question what that history has left out or occluded. It will consider what new directions might be indicated when we look at the role of cognition, emotion, and biopolitics in premodern representations of love.

The Feminine in André Gide's Works and Life

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Association des Amis d'André Gide. Presiding: Christine Latrouitte Armstrong, Denison Univ.

1. "La place de la femme: Le second 'problème' gidien," Justine Legrand, Paris Sorbonne Université

2. "Quel deuil pour quel corps? Gide's Elegiac Poetics in Et nunc manet in te," Alina Opreanu, Harvard Univ.

3. "Imagining Madeleine," John Sorrentino, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

For abstracts, write to armstrong@denison.edu.

Dickinson's Fictions of Voice

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Emily Dickinson International Society. Presiding: Elizabeth Petrino, Fairfield Univ.

1. "Dickinson and Sincerity: The Nineteenth-Century Context," Vivian R. Pollak, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

2. "The Speaking Dead: Animated Corpses and National Crisis in the Poetry of Emily Dickinson and Alfred Tennyson," Margaret Rennix, Harvard Univ.

3. "The Influence of Her Servants' Ethnic Vernaculars on Emily Dickinson's Language," Ai'fe Murray, San Francisco, CA

For abstracts, write to epetrino@fairfield.edu after 1 Dec.

Narrativity and Musicality: The Confluence of Language, Literature, and Culture

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the College Language Association. Presiding: Warren Carson, Univ. of South Carolina, Spartanburg

1. "Of Blues Narrative and Conjure Magic: A Symbiotic Dialectic in the Fiction of Arthur Flowers and J. J. Phillips," Kameelah Martin Samuel, Georgia State Univ.

2. "DuBois, Hansberry, and a Knock at Midnight," Dolan Hubbard, Morgan State Univ.

3. "Teaching Hip-Hop and Black Vernacular Tradition While Tackling the Boogie Man," Thabiti Lewis, Washington State Univ., Vancouver

Contemporary Italian Cinema

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of Italian. Presiding: Antonio Vitti, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

Speakers: Ryan Calabretta-Sajder, Middlebury Coll.; Elisabetta D'Amanda, Middlebury Coll.; Nicoletta Villa-Sella, Linsly School, WV; Maria Rosaria Vitti-Alexander, Nazareth Coll. of Rochester

This session's panelists will discuss contemporary trends in Italian cinema. Ample opportunity will be provided for members of the audience to engage in meaningful discussion of the topic.

The Queerness of Translation

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Translation. Presiding: Christopher E. Larkosh, Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

1. "Hellenic Freud: Translation and the Queering of Psychoanalysis," Richard Allen Kaye, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "Queer Is a Foreign Language," Merrill Cole, Western Illinois Univ.

3. "'Because I Liked You Better': Housman, Hellenism, and Homosexuality in Stoppard's The Invention of Love," Jenna Clark Embrey, Harvard Univ.

4. "Setting Plato Straight: Translating Ancient Sexuality in the Renaissance," Todd W. Reeser, Univ. of Pittsburgh

For abstracts, visit http://tinyurl.com/3z8n8dc.

Rethinking Nineteenth-Century Mexico

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Mexican Cultural and Literary Studies. Presiding: Juan Carlos Ramírez-Pimienta, San Diego State Univ.

1. "Mexico's Blackbeard: Piracy and American Economic Histories in Eligio Ancona's El filibustero," Sharada Balachandran Orihuela, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "El animal soberano: Placeres de la sátira y la invectiva en El gallo pitagórico de Juan Bautista Morales," Betina González, Univ. of Buenos Aires

3. "Políticas de la amistad decimonónica," Jose Ramon Ruisanchez Serra, Univ. of Houston, University Park

4. "Scientific Modernity and Santiago Sierra's El mundo científico (1877)," Maria del Pilar Blanco, University Coll. London

For abstracts, write to isanchez@wustl.edu.

Building Digital Humanities in the Undergraduate Classroom

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grand A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Kathi Inman Berens, Univ. of Southern California

Speakers: Kathryn E. Crowther, Georgia Inst. of Tech.; Brian Croxall, Emory Univ.; Maureen Engel, Univ. of Alberta; Paul Fyfe, Florida State Univ.; Kathi Inman Berens; Janelle A. Jenstad, Univ. of Victoria; Charlotte Nunes, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Heather Zwicker, Univ. of Alberta

This electronic roundtable assumes that "building stuff" is foundational to the digital humanities and that the technical barriers to participation can be low. When teaching undergraduates digital humanities, simple tools allow students to focus on the simultaneous practices of building and interpreting. This show-and-tell presents projects of variable technical complexity that foster robust interpretation.

For abstracts, visit briancroxall.net/buildingDH after 1 Dec.

New German-Russian Women Writers

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by Women in German. Presiding: Ekaterina Pirozhenko, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago; Regine Schwarzmeier, Belmont Univ.

1. "Patterns of Identity and Integration and Their Relation to Literary Form in Young German-Russian Women's Literature (Alina Bronsky, Lena Gorelik, Eleonora Hummel, Julya Rabinowich)," Weertje Willms, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

2. "Redefining the Borders or Squeezing into the Existing Frame? Russian-Jewish and Russian-German Women Writers Try to Define Themselves in the Contemporary German Society," Anna Rodzevich, Univ. of Toronto

3. "'Plötzlich hatte ich alles': Soviet Past and Shifting Femininity in Alina Bronsky's Die schärfsten Gerichte der tatarischen Küche," Karina Deifel, Univ. of California, Davis

4. "Incorporations: Topographies of Weakness in Julya Rabinowich's Novels," Helga Mitterbauer, Univ. of Alberta

Immaterial Evidence: Rhetoric, Religion, and Statistics

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the Victorian Period. Presiding: Eileen Gillooly, Columbia Univ.

1. "The Early Academic Journal; or, A (Literary) History of Persuasion," Maeve Adams, New York Univ.

2. "'Plain Historic Fact . . . Proved a Point': Browning's Dramatic Monologues and Evangelical Epistemologies," Erin Nerstad, Univ. of Chicago

3. "Probable Lives: Representation, Reality, and the Science of Statistics in The Ordeal of Richard Feverel," Michael Tondre, Georgia Inst. of Tech.

The Eighteenth Century in the Twenty-First-Century Curriculum: Innovative Approaches

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Early-Nineteenth-Century German Literature and the American Association of Teachers of German. Presiding: Karin Anneliese Wurst, Michigan State Univ.

1. "Ten Years of the Making of Modern Europe: A Retrospective," C. Lynne Tatlock, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

2. "Teaching Eighteenth-Century Gender and Racial Stereotypes through Mozart's Zauberflöte," Alyssa L. Howards, Wake Forest Univ.

3. "The Real Household Tales of Europe: Teaching Fairy Tales Online," Angelika N. Kraemer, Michigan State Univ.

Pacific Northwest Exchanges

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the Western Literature Association and the Division on Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Alexander J. Hunt, West Texas A&M Univ.

1. "'Leap into the Dark': Hybridity and Invention in Cogewea," Sarah York, Univ. of Waterloo

2. "Writing Black, Writing Seattle: Ema and Lloyd Ray's Twice Sold, Twice Ransomed," Eric S. Gardner, Saginaw Valley State Univ.

3. "Seattle Is a Dead Man: Palimpsestic Cultural Origins in the Pacific Northwest," Andy Meyer, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

4. "'Places That Can Remake You': Feminism, Aleut History, and Taking Big Risks in Cindy Dyson's And She Was," Eric Heyne, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks

A Marketplace of Ideas? The Future of Early British Literary Studies

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robyn Malo, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette; Manushag Powell, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

1. "Problems for the Future," Helen Deutsch, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

2. "Curricular Requirements and the Problems of the Present," Seth Lerer, Univ. of California, San Diego

3. "Solutions?" Emily Hodgson Anderson, Univ. of Southern California

Travel and Ethnography in the Time of Jean de Léry

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Micah True, Univ. of Alberta

1. "Travel Writing and Ethnographic Authority in Léry and Cartier," Micah True

2. "The Accidental Ethnographers: Cabeza de Vaca and Léry," Rachel L. Burk, Tulane Univ.

3. "'For Love of Us': Protestant Ethnographers' Unspeakable Investments in the Face of Failure," Christine Varnado, Columbia Univ.

Ecstasy: The Writing of Delirium in Middle Eastern Literature

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Lucian Stone, Univ. of North Dakota

1. "Reading Guilt as a Signpost of Reality," Sharareh Frouzesh Bennett, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "Delirium in Prerevolutionary Iranian Literature," Babak Rahimi, Univ. of California, San Diego

3. "Inhuman Ecstasies: Existential Transformation in the Works of Ahmad Shamlu, Nima Yushij, and Adonis," Jason Mohaghegh, New Jersey City Univ.

4. "Speaking from the Void: Subjectivity and Ecstasy in Wild Thorns," Aliza Atik, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York

For abstracts, visit www.sctiw.org.

Beyond the Hispanic Atlantic: New Transoceanic and Postcolonial Articulations

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Alda Blanco, San Diego State Univ.

1. "Madrid–Alaska–New Zealand: Rediscovering the Pacific: The Prodigious Reinvention of Malaspina," José Colmeiro, Univ. of Auckland

2. "Mundaka–Liverpool–Manila: Etxeita, Rizal, and the Hispanic (Post)Colonial Effacement of the Pacific," Joseba Gabilondo, Michigan State Univ.

3. "Liverpool–Bilbao–Vigo–Las Palmas: Toward a Postnational Hispanic Atlantic Geopoetics," Kirsty Hooper, Univ. of Liverpool

Apocalypse as Aporia: Crises and Representation in Film and Fiction

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Lynn Ann McGovern, Merrimack Coll.

1. "The Destruction of Myth and Myths of Destruction in El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo," Mela Jones Heestand, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "Viral Metamorphosis and Postcolonial Hybridity in American Apocalyptic Films," Shane Trayers, Macon Coll.

3. "Social Allegory and Apocalypse," Laura Hudson, Univ. of California, Davis

Representation in the Shadow of New Media Technologies

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada. Presiding: Lan Dong, Univ. of Illinois, Springfield

1. "Web Video and Ethnic Media: Linking Representation and Distribution," Aymar Jean Christian, Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Among Friends: Comparing Social Networking Functions in the Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Afro-American in 1904 and 1933," Daniel Greene, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

3. "Digital Trash Talk: The Rhetoric of Instrumental Racism as Procedural Strategy," Lisa Nakamura, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

From Spain to Sephardic Culture, Language, Literature, and Self-Identity

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Sephardic Studies. Presiding: Nechama Kramer-Hellinx, York Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Jews and Jewishness in Contemporary Iberian Literature," Alfredo J. Sosa-Velasco, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Translating the Self in Marcel Cohen's Letras a un pintor," Celine Piser, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Amadís de Gaula in Constantinople," David A. Wacks, Univ. of Oregon

4. "At Home and Abroad: Forging Sephardic Identity before and after the Diasporas of the Nação Portuguesa," Joseph Abraham Levi, George Washington Univ.

For abstracts, write to nkramerh@nyc.rr.com.

Unsettling Canadian Literature

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Canadian Literature in English. Presiding: Jennifer Anne Henderson, Carleton Univ.

1. "'Start with the Darkness and Paint in the Light': Settler 'Identity Cards' and Clandestine Desires in Canada and New Zealand," Jennifer Lawn, Massey Univ., Auckland

2. "Unsettling Experiences: Ethical Witnessing and the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission," Jennifer Hardwick, Queen's Univ.

3. "Indigenizing Diasporas and Indigenous Diasporas: Presence versus Absence in First Nations and Diasporic Writing," Maude Lapierre, Université de Montréal

Open Hearing on Resolutions

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 309, WSCC

Presiding: Members of the Delegate Assembly Organizing Committee

Reading across Communities: Linguistic Approaches to the Teaching of Literature

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Linguistic Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Laura Aull, Wake Forest Univ.

1. "Language-Literature Interface: An Intercultural Study of Kiran Desai," Rajyashree Khushu-Lahiri, Indian Inst. of Tech., Roorkee

2. "Generic Uptake in Networks of Style," Jeffrey Wajsberg, Univ. of British Columbia

3. "A Cognitive Approach to Intertextuality and Its Implications for Literary Linguistics and Teaching," Maria-Eirini Panagiotidou, Univ. of Nottingham

For papers, write to kcss@stanford.edu after 20 Nov.

Self-Destruction in Children's and Young-Adult Literature

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Children's Literature. Presiding: Melanie Goss, Illinois State Univ.

1. "Resistant Rituals: Self-Mutilation and the Female Adolescent Body in Children's and Young-Adult Literature," Cheryl Cowdy, York Univ.

2. "The Power of the Wound: Manifesting Trauma and Self-Destruction in Young-Adult Fantasy Novels," Balaka Basu, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

3. "Self-Reconstruction: Youth Agency and the New Reality of Young-Adult Problem Novels," Robert Bittner, Univ. of British Columbia

4. "The Final Girl Survives: Adolescent Self-Destruction in Teen Horror," Christopher William McGee, Longwood Univ.

New Currents in Medieval Hispanic Studies

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Presiding: Ryan Giles, Univ. of Chicago

1. "Courtesan Bodies and Chivalric Codes in La historia de los nobles caualleros Oliueros de Castilla y Artus d'Algarve (1499?)," Amy Austin, Univ. of Texas, Arlington

2. "Textual Production and Material Culture," Ana Maria Gómez-Bravo, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

3. "Mapping Transconfessional Spaces through the Cantar de Mio Cid," Gregory S. Hutcheson, Univ. of Louisville

Realisms after Modernisms

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Postcolonial Studies in Literature and Culture. Presiding: Susan Z. Andrade, Univ. of Pittsburgh

1. "Inverse Mimesis and the Realist Aesthetics of Literary Criticism: Roberto Bolaño's The Savage Detectives and 2666," Tania Gentic, Georgetown Univ.

2. "'Neo-realism' in Different Voices," Gautam Premnath, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Ways of Seeing: Caribbean Realism and the Visual Image," Emily Hyde, Princeton Univ.

4. "The Realist Novel Diverted: Epistemology and Form in George Lamming's The Emigrants," Nicholas Robinette, Oberlin Coll.

Women Poets in the Wake of Modernism

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry. Presiding: Susan McCabe, Univ. of Southern California

1. "Marianne Moore and the Emerging Modernist Canon in the 1940s," Luke Carson, Univ. of Victoria

2. "'The Greeks and Trojans Alike Fought for an Illusion': The Milieu of the Cold War and H.D.'s Helen in Egypt," Annette Debo, Western Carolina Univ.

3. "Modernist Geologies and the Emergent Elizabeth Bishop," Cassandra Laity, Univ. of Montreal

4. "Poetic Possession and Erotic Dispossession in H.D. and Harryette Mullen," Jeanne Diane Heuving, Univ. of Washington, Bothell

Rousseau at Three Hundred

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Susan A. Maslan, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Rousseau 2012: Are We Just Yet?" Julia V. Douthwaite, Univ. of Notre Dame

2. "The Ambivalent Rousseau," Natasha Lee, Princeton Univ.

3. "Rousseau, Condorcet, and the Limits of Modern, Mass Democracy," Guillaume Ansart, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

4. "Rousseau and the Closure of History: Rereading the End of the Second Discourse," Oleg Gelikman, Soka Univ. of America

For abstracts, write to samaslan@berkeley.edu after 1 Dec.

Intercultural Contacts in Dutch Studies

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Netherlandic Language and Literature. Presiding: Jeroen Dewulf, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Intercultural Contacts in Time of War: The German Occupation and the Flemish Movement, 1914–18," Ulrich Tiedau, University Coll. London

2. "Missing Links in Dutch Postcolonial Society: The Pioneering Works of Authors of Moroccan or Indo-Dutch Origin," Stéphanie Loriaux, Free Univ. of Brussels

3. "The Specter of 'Indo-Dutchness' in Dutch Travel Writing of Indonesia: Marion Bloem’s Muggen, Mensen, Olifanten," Sarah de Mul, Univ. of Leuven

4. "Rachida Lamrabet and the Multiple Voices of Morocco: A Discussion of the Polyphonic Novel Vrouwland," Marjan Nijborg, Univ. of Amsterdam

For abstracts, visit dutch.berkeley.edu.

Clocks, Jacks, Jacquemarts: Time as Character in Early Modern Drama

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Richard Mark Preiss, Univ. of Utah

1. "'For Now Hath Time Made Me His Numbering Clock': Shakespeare's Jacquemarts," Wendy Beth Hyman, Oberlin Coll.

2. "Tick-Talk: Hamlet," Richard Mark Preiss

3. "'Observe the Sawcinesse of the Jackes': Clock Jacks and the Complexity of Time in Early Modern England," Tiffany Stern, Univ. of Oxford, University Coll.

Radical Print Culture

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. Presiding: Greg Barnhisel, Duquesne Univ.

1. "Early-Twentieth-Century African American Journalism: Seeking a Radical Ideal," Jane Rhodes, Macalester Coll.

2. "Poetry and Violence (Some from Satin Shoes!): Prison Mimeography in the Age of Revolution and Reaction," Larry Sullivan, John Jay Coll. of Criminal Justice, City Univ. of New York

3. "Wake Up, Queers: AIDS Activist Print Culture 1987–96," Marty Fink, Concordia Univ.

Respondent: Kristin L. Matthews, Brigham Young Univ., UT

For abstracts, visit sharpweb.org.

Is "Access" the New "Diversity"? Rethinking Access across the Profession

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the National Council of Teachers of English. Presiding: Margaret Price, Spelman Coll.

Speakers: Annette Powell, Bellarmine Univ.; Kathleen Yancey, Florida State Univ.; Melanie Yergeau, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Respondent: Margaret Price

At least since 1999, when Charles Moran called access "the A-word" in technology studies, access has been a touchstone in scholarly conversations. Yet there is still a general tendency to regard access as a vague good thing; here we trouble that idea. In this roundtable, three scholars in rhetoric and composition explore access as it plays out through technology, scholarly publishing, race, disability, and multimodal learning.

Queer Performance: Space, Bodies, and Movement(s)

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages. Presiding: Francesca Therese Royster, DePaul Univ.

1. "Race-ing Time through Queer Xicana Performance," Aimee Carrillo Rowe, Univ. of Iowa

2. "Crip Out: Freakish Performance and the Rogue Queer History," Robert McRuer, George Washington Univ.

3. "Ring or Shout," Sharon Bridgforth, DePaul Univ.

For abstracts, write to ltorres@depaul.edu.

Intersections between American Indian and Other Literary Traditions

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Tereza M. Szeghi, Univ. of Dayton

1. "Bearing Witness to the Self and the Community: Testimonial Works by Indigenous Peoples in the Americas," Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech Univ.

2. "Anthropocentric Ecologies and the 'Ecological Native': Paradoxes of Environmental Conservation in American Indian, Māori, and Aboriginal Taiwanese Literatures," Karen Thornber, Harvard Univ.

3. "From Joaquín Murieta to Machete: 160 Years of Violence, Sex, and History," Maria A. Windell, Wake Forest Univ.

Recognition as Critique

Friday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures after 1900. Presiding: Henry Em, New York Univ.

1. "Tanizaki's Ventriloquism: Narrative Politics of Local and National in Manji," Michael Cronin, Coll. of William and Mary

2. "The Neighbor's Monstrous Face: Yi Cheongjun's Lepers," Youngju Ryu, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

3. "Arduous Path to Re-cognition: Nakano Shigeharu's 'A Locomotive Stoker,'" Yukiko Shigeto, Whitman Coll.

Getting Funded in the Humanities: An NEH Workshop

Friday, 1:30–3:30 p.m., 3B, WSCC

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Jason C. Rhody, National Endowment for the Humanities

This workshop will highlight recent awards and outline current funding opportunites. In addition to emphasizing grant programs that support individual and collaborative research and education, the workshop will include information on the NEH's Office of Digital Humanities. A question-and-answer period will follow.

The Avant-Garde and Metahistory

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of Dada and Surrealism. Presiding: Jonathan P. Eburne, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Surreal History: André Breton between Dada and Marx," Michael Levenson, Univ. of Virginia

2. "Brazilian Modernism as an Autohistorigraphical Avant-Garde," Marcelo Moreschi, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "History as Eaten by the Neo-Avant-Garde," Cecilia Novero, Otago Univ.

4. "The CBGB Scene and the End of History," Shaun Cullen, Univ. of Virginia

Bad Romance: Reading, Race, and Religion in Early Modern English Romance

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 309, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lauren Shohet, Villanova Univ.

1. "Sanctifying Romance: Converting the Islamic Self in Harington's Orlando Furioso," Dennis Britton, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

2. "Lady Mary Wroth's Global Romance and the Traffic in Fashion," Lori Humphrey Newcomb, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Amadis Lost and Found: Romance and the Embarrassment of Origins," Sarah Wall-Randell, Wellesley Coll.

4. "Romancing Truth in Henry VIII; or, All Is True," Tiffany Jo Werth, Simon Fraser Univ.

Devotion Unbound: New Approaches to Victorian Poetics and Religion

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Cynthia Scheinberg, Mills Coll.

1. "Psalm and Sonnet: Religious Aesthetics and Victorian Poetics," Cynthia Scheinberg

2. "The Unlikely Religious Interpretation of Shakespeare's Sonnets," Charles P. LaPorte, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "Liturgical and Poetic Practice: Word and Sacrament in Selected Poems by Elizabeth Barrett and Christina Rossetti," Karen Dieleman, Trinity Christian Coll.

Forming Histories, Historicizing Forms

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Andrea Kelly Henderson, Univ. of California, Irvine

1. "Boole, Carroll, and the Aesthetics of Logical Formalism," Andrea Kelly Henderson

2. "Translation, Rhetoric, and the Terraqueous Form of The Waves," Nicole Rizzuto, Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater

3. "Realism, Seriality, and the End of History," Lauren M. E. Goodlad, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Respondents: Stephen M. Best, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Marshall J. Brown, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Idealism as Ideology: Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Modern Political Representation

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Daniel Purdy, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Political Representation in Kant and Hegel," David Pan, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "Fichte, Jean Paul, and the Identity of the Letter," Till Dembeck, Univ. of Mainz

3. "Early-Nineteenth-Century Idealism, Kant, and the Contemporary Ethnic-Centered Novel," Lou Freitas Caton, Westfield State Univ.

For abstracts, write to lcaton@wsc.ma.edu.

The Avian Turn: Human-Avian Desire and Anxiety in Medieval Literature

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Donna Beth Ellard, Rice Univ.

1. "Avian Anxiety: Anatomy and Aristocracy in Marie de France's Yonec and Cheuelere Assigne," Randy P. Schiff, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

2. "Virtually Human: The Transformation of Kynde in Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls," Jeanne L. Provost, Furman Univ.

3. "Holy Territory: Becoming-Bird in Ancrene Wisse," Megan Palmer Browne, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

What Makes Language Literary?

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Metropolitan A, Sheraton

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum The Presidential Forum: Language, Literature, Learning (202). Presiding: Sabine Wilke, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Speakers: Charles Francis Altieri, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Daniel Dooghan, Univ. of Tampa; Frances Ferguson, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD; Alexander C. Y. Huang, George Washington Univ.

This roundtable asks whether the familiar pairing “language and literature” is more than just an academic convention. Is literature a necessary function of language, or is language merely the vehicle with which literature pursues its own ends? At stake are questions of rhetoric and criticism, poetic language, the standing of translation, and the tensions between historical experience and aesthetic autonomy.

Responses to a Changing World: German Language, Literature, and Culture in the Twenty-First Century

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Susanne Rinner, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

Speakers: Cori Crane, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Mark Lauer, Mount Holyoke Coll.; Hiram H. Maxim, Emory Univ.; Susanne Rinner; Marianna V. Ryshina-Pankova, Georgetown Univ.

The collegiate foreign language (FL) profession is faced with a number of challenges ranging from real or threatened closings of departments to increased pressure to instrumentalize course offerings for the preprofessional student population. This roundtable discussion gathers representatives from collegiate FL departments to discuss concrete measures taken to build sustainable programs that highlight the importance of FL study for a liberal arts education.

Modernism and Theory

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Modernist Studies Association. Presiding: Pamela L. Caughie, Loyola Univ., Chicago

Speakers: Enda Duffy, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Vassiliki Kolocotroni, Univ. of Glasgow; Janet W. Lyon, Penn State Univ., University Park; Jean-Michel Rabaté, Univ. of Pennsylvania

This roundtable addresses the elision of theory in the new modernist studies. Recent scholarship on new manuscripts, new global and temporal dimensions of modernism, and new material and cultural forms raises theoretical questions of the kind that gave rise to the new modernist studies in the 1990s. This roundtable seeks to synthesize, through theoretically informed inquiries, the diverse understandings that the recent expansion of modernism has generated.

Untold Sisters Today: New Approaches to Iberian and Latin American Women's Writing (pre-1800)

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by GEMELA: Grupo de Estudios sobre la Mujer en España y las Américas (pre-1800). Presiding: Stacey Schlau, West Chester Univ.

1. "When Beauty Is Not Truth: Word, Image, and Gender in Sor Juana's 'Este que ves' sonnet," Sonia Velázquez, Princeton Univ.

2. "Autobiography, Mystical Doctrine, Sickness, and Social Censure: Studying and Teaching Teresa de Ávila's Libro de la vida," Encarnación Juárez-Almendros, Univ. of Notre Dame

3. "Rethinking Women's Authorship in the Early Republic of Letters," Esther María Villegas de la Torre, Univ. of Nottingham

4. "Sixteenth-Century Women Who Record Their Voices: Land, Power, and Writing in Early Colonial Perú," Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Michigan State Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.gemela.org.

Where Are All the Brown People? Interdisciplinary Approaches to Popular Film and Television

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Chicana and Chicano Literature. Presiding: Domino Renee Perez, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Machete in the Toolbox: The Use of Estrangement in Robert Rodriguez's Machete," Samuel Saldivar, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "Between Desire and Displacement: The Politics of Gender, Race, and San Francisco in La Mission (2009)," Juanita Isabel Heredia, Northern Arizona Univ.

3. "Betty's Legacy: Leaving a Queer Latina/o Time and Place," Tanya Gonzalez, Kansas State Univ.; Eliza Rodriguez y Gibson, Loyola Marymount Univ.

Radical Learning Strategies

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on the Two-Year College. Presiding: Susannah Mary Chewning, Union County Coll., NJ

1. "Applying a Cross-Cultural and Cross-National Comparative and Interdisciplinary Methodology for Teaching Twentieth-Century Contemporary American Literature," Judy Bertonazzi, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Pedagogical Adaptations: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Writing," Robi Rhodes, Central Ohio Technical Coll.

3. "Usability Methods in Composition Pedagogy," Shreelina Ghosh, Michigan State Univ.

Communicating Contingent Realities

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Part-Time Faculty Members. Presiding: Andrew William Smith, Tennessee Tech Univ.

1. "Follow the Profits: University Budgets and Contingent Faculty Members," Robert Samuels, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

2. "Who Speaks for the Academy? Perceived Privilege and the Public Conversation," Monica F. Jacobe, Princeton Univ.

3. "Stakeholders and High-Stakes Teaching: Contingent Faculty Members and Outcomes-Based Funding Models," Kurt Eisen, Tennessee Tech Univ.

For abstracts, visit http://contingentfacultyatmlapanel.blogspot.com.

Mark Twain and the "Other"

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Mark Twain Circle of America. Presiding: Susan K. Harris, Univ. of Kansas

1. "Coolies and Corporate Personhood in Those Extraordinary Twins," Hsuan L. Hsu, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "Mark Twain and the Maori," Kerry Driscoll, Saint Joseph Coll.

3. "Jumping the Grenouille," Paula Claire Harrington, Colby Coll.

Acrobatic Figures, Acrobatics of Figuration in Zola, the Goncourts, Seurat, and Rachilde

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Margaret E. Gray, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

1. "The Acrobatics of Rhetoric, the Exercise of Reading: Zola," Susan Harrow, Univ. of Bristol

2. "The Fantaisiste Aesthetic in the Fiction of Edmond and Jules de Goncourt," Peter Vantine, Saint Michael's Coll.

3. "Visual Acrobatics: Spectacular Entertainment in Georges Seurat's Circus Paintings," Claire White, Univ. of Cambridge, Peterhouse Coll.

4. "Playing with Knives (also Cultures, Literary Genres, Bodies, and Readers) in Rachilde's La jongleuse," Margaret E. Gray

For abstracts, write to megray@indiana.edu.

Modernists and Vagueness

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Peter T. Schwenger, Mount Saint Vincent Univ.

1. "T. S. Eliot and the Eradication of Vagueness," Megan M. Quigley, Villanova Univ.

2. "A 'Vagueness That Is Violence': Vagueness and Metaphysics in the Early Writings of Gertrude Stein," Nandini Ramesh Sankar, Cornell Univ.

3. "Robert Walser's Modest Imprecision," Jan P. Plug, Univ. of Western Ontario

Dissent and Rebellion in the Arab World

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Hanan Elsayed, Occidental Coll.

1. "Blogging for Freedom: Arab Girl Power and the Internet," Aliyah Khan, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

2. "Poetics of Dissent in Egypt," Yasser Elhariry, New York Univ.

3. "Exploding the Myth of the Arab Street," Ken Seigneurie, Simon Fraser Univ.

4. "The Devil, Drugs, and/or Iran Made Them Do It: Regime Responses to Rebellion in the Arab World 2011," Michael Gasper, Occidental Coll.

Humor and Subversion: Approaches to Pacific Literature and Orature at the Universities of Hawai‘i and Guam

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 608, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Caroline Sinavaiana, Univ. of Hawai‘i, Mānoa

1. "bro'Town and The Naked Samoans: Ritual Clowning Goes Prime Time," Caroline Sinavaiana

2. "Mokes with Jokes: Nah Nah Nah Nah--'Bussing Laugh' as Colonial Resistance," Ku‘ualoha Ho‘omanawanui, Univ. of Hawai‘i, Mānoa

3. "The Illusions of Betrayal: Mudrooroo, Indigenousness, and the Stage I Make," Nicholas J. Goetzfridt, Univ. of Guam

4. "Anticolonial Humor and Poetic Resistance in the American Colonies of the Pacific," Brandy Nalani McDougall, Univ. of Hawai‘i, Mānoa

Respondent: Craig Perez, Univ. of California, Berkeley

For abstracts, write to sinavaia@hawaii.edu.

Yiddish Theater and Film

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Yiddish Literature. Presiding: Ken Frieden, Syracuse Univ.

1. "The Vilna Troupe and the Emergence of a Modernist Yiddish Theatrical Aesthetic," Debra Caplan, Harvard Univ.

2. "The Early Films of Ernst Lubitsch: Yiddish Theater and Its Afterlives," Raysh Weiss, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

3. "Staging a Jewish Post-Shoah European Theater: Sloves, Grumberg, and Tabori," Seth L. Wolitz, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Natural and Supernatural Disasters

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-, Eighteenth-, and Nineteenth-Century Italian Literature. Presiding: Clorinda Donato, California State Univ., Long Beach

1. "'E la cittade ondoso labirinto': Floods and Chaos in Baroque Italian Poetry," Marco Arnaudo, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "'Terra tremante': European Reactions to Late-Seventeenth-Century Earthquakes in Naples," Nathalie Hester, Univ. of Oregon

3. "Italy’s Disaster as England’s Museum," Daniel Darvay, Univ. of Oklahoma

4. "The English Reaction to the Great Neapolitan Earthquake of 1857: Narrating the Iniquities of the Kingdom of the 'Re Bomba,'" Jonathan Hiller, Adelphi Univ.

Radical Friendships in South Asia

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on South Asian Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Karni Pal Bhati, Furman Univ.

1. "Rethinking Partition: Radical Hospitality in Jyotirmoyee Devi's Epar Ganga, Opar Ganga," Chandrima Chakraborty, McMaster Univ.

2. "'Not Yet Postcolonial?': Arundhati Roy and the Contemporary Resistance 'Model,'" John Maerhofer, Bronx Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

3. "Conflicting Loyalties: Forster, Dewas, and Other Friends against Empire," Karni Pal Bhati

For abstracts, write to kbhati@furman.edu after 15 Nov.

Reading across Media

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Deniz Göktürk, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Reading on the Move," Lutz Koepnick, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

2. "Fighting Stupidity and Playing Music: Musil, Adorno, and the Performativity of Interpretation," Heather Love, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "Literature on the Radio: Sound and the Intermedial Modulation of Knowledge," Daniel Gilfillan, Arizona State Univ.

Language Matters: Philology, Linguistics, and the MLA

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change. Presiding: Chris Palmer, Kennesaw State Univ.

1. "Philology and the MLA: A History of English Language History," Colette V. Moore, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Rethinking the L in MLA: Language, Literature, and the Future of English," Tara Williams, Oregon State Univ.

Karen Sullivan's The Inner Lives of Medieval Inquisitors

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on French Medieval Language and Literature. Presiding: Cary Howie, Cornell Univ.

Speakers: Karen Elizabeth Gross, Lewis and Clark Coll.; Anna Klosowska, Miami Univ., Oxford; Karmen MacKendrick, LeMoyne Coll.; Bonnie Wheeler, Southern Methodist Univ.

Respondent: Karen Sullivan, Bard Coll.

Discussion of Karen Sullivan's recently published The Inner Lives of Medieval Inquisitors, which considers inquisitors' often difficult choices. Panelists will address the literary, philosophical, erotic, and historical implications of the Inquisition--including interiority, interrogation, admonition, and conversion--which, rooted in medieval France and Iberia, extend well into the rest of the medieval and arguably the modern world.

Reconfiguring Publishing

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Grand A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology. Presiding: Carolyn Guertin, Univ. of Texas, Arlington; William Thompson, Western Illinois Univ.

Speakers: Carolyn Guertin; Gail E. Hawisher, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; James MacGregor, Public Knowledge Project; Rita Raley, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Avi Santo, Old Dominion Univ.; Cynthia L. Selfe, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

This session intends not to bury publishing but to raise awareness of its transformations and continuities as it reconfigures itself. New platforms are causing publishers to return to their roots as booksellers while booksellers are once again becoming publishers. Open-access models of publishing are creating new models for content creation and distribution as small print-focused presses are experiencing a renaissance. Come see!

For abstracts, visit www.wiu.edu/users/wat100/2012_reconfigure/.

Idealism(s)

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century. Presiding: Ian Grant Balfour, York Univ., Keele

1. "'Idea': The History of the Term in German Idealism from Kant to Schelling," Tilottama Rajan, Univ. of Western Ontario

2. "Just Enough Kant," David L. Clark, McMaster Univ.

3. "'Original Materialism': Coleridge, de Man, and the Translation of German Idealism," Tom Toremans, University Coll. Brussels

On War: Classical and Modern Perspectives

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Classical Studies and Modern Literature. Presiding: Ramona A. Naddaff, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Theaters of War," Jana Adamitis, Christopher Newport Univ.

2. "Friend and Foe," Wolf Kittler, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "Antigone: War's Aftermath and Terms of Peace," Nicole Jerr, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

Octavia Butler and Ethnic American Speculative Fiction

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Ethnic Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Susan Tomlinson, Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston

1. "Still the Master's House? Home-Building Anxiety in Octavia Butler's Kindred," Koritha Mitchell, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "Breaking Down Binaries: The Function of the Fantastic in Nnedi Okorfor's Who Fears Death," Jennifer Miller, Valparaiso Univ.

3. "Octavia Butler's Kindred and the Problem of Intimate Violence," Wanda Raiford, Univ. of Iowa

The Novel after Postmodernism

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Marxist Literary Group. Presiding: Madhu Dubey, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

Speakers: Timothy Bewes, Brown Univ.; Nicholas Mainey Brown, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago; Madhu Dubey; Sue J. Kim, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham; Rolland Murray, Brown Univ.; Mathias Nilges, Saint Francis Xavier Univ.; Emilio Sauri, Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston

This roundtable aims to approach the general question of the end of postmodernism and the challenges of periodization and the theorization of literary history this question generates by examining the particular (formal, narratological, etc.) changes the novel has undergone in recent years.

Provocative Feminisms

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses. Presiding: Juliana M. Spahr, Mills Coll.

1. "The Politics of Aesthetics and Ethics: The Distribution of the Insensible," Vanessa Place, Les Figues Press

2. "Queering Normative Texts," Erica Kaufman, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

3. "The Demon in the House: Small Presses, Women Poets, and Teenage Speakers," Danielle Pafunda, Univ. of Wyoming

Theorizing Hip-Hop: New Approaches to Hip-Hop as Intellectual Production

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jill Richardson, Borough of Manhattan Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Queer Hip-Hop Diasporas: A History," Shante Paradigm Smalls, Davidson Coll.

2. "The Shadows of Tomorrow: Hip-Hop, Madlib, and the Archive," James Ford, Occidental Coll.

3. "Hip-Hop Is Not What You Think It Is," Michael Ralph, New York Univ.

4. "Performing Male Desire: The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Drug Culture," Jill Richardson

For abstracts, write to jilltrichardson@msn.com.

Charlie Chan Is Undead: Reopening the Case of America's First Mainstream Minority Detective

Friday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Charles Julian Rzepka, Boston Univ.

1. "Why Charlie Chan Now?" Yunte Huang, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

2. "Mocking Modernity: Signifyin' and Simulation in The Chinese Parrot," Charles Julian Rzepka

3. "The Death of the Oriental Detective: Charlie Chan at the End of Genre," R. John Williams, Yale Univ.

Respondent: Karen Fang, Univ. of Houston

"We Can't Afford the Luxury of Pretense": Black Womanhood, Writing, Discourse, and Literacy

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Conference on College Composition and Communication. Presiding: Gwendolyn Pough, Syracuse Univ.

1. "From Mad Women in the Attic to Sad Women in the Basement to Angry Black Bitches with Blogs," Gwendolyn Pough

2. "We're Still Waiting: Discourses of Women and HIV/AIDS in African American Magazines," Ayana Weekley, Grand Valley State Univ.

3. "To Correct and Serve: Healing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Instruction in African American Women's Self-Help Books," Tamika Carey, Univ. of North Carolina, Pembroke

4. "Developing Critical Literacies of Black Womanhood in an After-School Program," Elaine Richardson, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Booking Marlowe

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Marlowe Society of America. Presiding: Roslyn L. Knutson, Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock

1. "Anonymous Marlowe," Adam G. Hooks, Univ. of Iowa

2. "Leander's Index: Marlowe, Books, and Passion," Sarah Wall-Randell, Wellesley Coll.

3. "Nicholas Ling, Elizabethan Republicanism, and The Famouse Tragedie of the Riche Jewe of Malta (1594)," Kirk Melnikoff, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

For abstracts, visit www.marlowesmightyline.org.

Unofficial Lusophone Spaces

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Lusophone Literatures and Cultures outside Portugal and Brazil. Presiding: Bonnie S. Wasserman, Fordham Univ., Bronx

1. "Dislocation and Subjectivity: Noll in Berkeley, London, and Bellagio," Marcus V. C. Brasileiro, Utah State Univ.

2. "Mahalo for Malassadas: Portuguese Confluence in Hawaiian Pidgin Language and Culture," Fernanda Ferreira, Bridgewater State Univ.

3. "In and out of Portuguese in Luso-Asian Diasporic Writing," Christopher E. Larkosh, Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

South-South Dialogues

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on English Literature Other Than British and American. Presiding: Mark Allen Sanders, Emory Univ.

1. "Displacing the Metropole: Chris Abani's The Virgin of Flames and Kiran Desai's The Inheritance of Loss," Megan Jones, Univ. of the Witwatersrand

2. "Transnational Nationalisms: East Africa, South Africa, India," Gaurav G. Desai, Tulane Univ.

3. "Reaching, without Knowing It, for an Explanation of Her Own Life: The Image of Anne Frank in Two Novels of the Caribbean Diaspora," Rosemary Harrington, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

4. "Telling Lives: Reimagining the Periphery and Metropole," Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Revisiting "Nation" in the Study of American Literature and Culture

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Literature Section. Presiding: Dana D. Nelson, Vanderbilt Univ.

Speakers: John Ernest, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown; Susan K. Harris, Univ. of Kansas; William J. Maxwell, Washington Univ. in St. Louis; Joycelyn K. Moody, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio; Sarah Ruffing Robbins, Texas Christian Univ.

How can the interpretive categories of "the U.S." and "the nation" inform the study of American literatures and cultures? Speakers examine ways to put interpretive frames of the "national" into dialogue with other critical categories. Panelists discuss the national as a useful interpretive lens and ways to redirect conversations toward both/and approaches in place of binaries such as the national versus the transnational.

Wagner and the Machine

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Opera as a Literary and Dramatic Form. Presiding: Joy Calico, Vanderbilt Univ.

1. "Reality Overtakes Myth: Technology in the Ring Production of Ivo van Hove," Francis Maes, Ghent Univ.

2. "Wagner and the Technological Other," Holly Watkins, Eastman School of Music

3. "Gesamtkunstwerk and Glitch," Matthew W. Smith, Boston Univ.

The New Dissertation: Thinking outside the (Proto-)Book

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Executive Council. Presiding: Kathleen Woodward, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Speakers: David Damrosch, Harvard Univ.; Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA; Richard E. Miller, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Sidonie Ann Smith, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Kathleen Woodward

In 2010 the Executive Council appointed a working group to explore the state of the doctoral dissertation: How can it adapt to digital innovation, open access, new concepts of "authorship"? What counts as scholarship in the world today? How do we address the national problems of cost and time to degree? This roundtable will offer members of the working group an opportunity to make the case that as we shift the terminology from scholarly publication to scholarly communication we need to expand the forms of the dissertation and to reconceptualize what the dissertation is and how it can prepare graduates for academic careers in the coming decades.

Asian Americans and Graphic Narrative

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Asian American Literature. Presiding: Timothy Yu, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Speakers: Rachelle Cruz, Univ. of California, Riverside; Lan Dong, Univ. of Illinois, Springfield; Tomo Hattori, California State Univ., Northridge; Caroline Kyungah Hong, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York; Hye Su Park, Ohio State Univ., Columbus; Gene Luen Yang, San Jose, CA

Gene Luen Yang, author of American Born Chinese, will be the featured speaker in this discussion of Asian American graphic narrative. Graphic novels and memoirs form an increasingly important part of the Asian American literary canon, offering new insights into issues of stereotyping, autobiography, and historical memory. GB Tran's Vietnamerica, Adrian Tomine's Shortcomings, and Lynda Barry's One Hundred Demons will be among the works discussed.

Comparative Globalism in the Early Modern Period

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature of the English Renaissance, Excluding Shakespeare. Presiding: Rebecca Lemon, Univ. of Southern California

1. "Literary Models, Imperial Exemplars," Barbara Fuchs, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

2. "Islam in the English Imaginary in the Early Modern Period," Jyotsna G. Singh, Michigan State Univ.

3. "From Myth to Market: Mesoamerica in Early Modern Literature," Edward M. Test, Boise State Univ.

4. "'All the World' on the Early Modern Stage," Emily C. Bartels, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

Dickens in France

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Susan McCready, Univ. of South Alabama

1. "An Ironic Take on the Terror; or, How Flaubert Rewrote Dickens," Julia V. Douthwaite, Univ. of Notre Dame

2. "The Melodrama of History: Carlyle, Dickens, and Sand on the Morality of the Revolution," Melanie Conroy, Stanford Univ.

3. "Dickens's Chickens," Carolyn Jane Betensky, Univ. of Rhode Island

States of Consciousness in Literature

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Cognitive Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Isabel Jaén-Portillo, Portland State Univ.

1. "Embodied Consciousness: Djuna Barnes and Her Readers," Ellen J. Esrock, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

2. "Falling Asleep While Reading," Peter T. Schwenger, Univ. of Western Ontario

3. "Gender and Traumatic Memory in Post-1960s United States Women's Novels and Neuroscience," Megan Ahern, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

4. "The Literary Neuroscience of Kafka's Hypnagogic Labyrinth: How Literature Informs the Neuroscientific Study of Self and Its Disorders," Aaron Mishara, Chicago School of Professional Psychology

For papers, visit https://sites.google.com/site/mlacogdiscussiongroup or e-mail jaen@pdx.edu after 15 Nov.

Reenvisioning Foreign Language Education in the Current Economy

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of University Supervisors and Coordinators. Presiding: Thomas J. Garza, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Speakers: Carlee Arnett, Univ. of California, Davis; Glenn Levine, Univ. of California, Irvine; Robert Dabney Peckham, Univ. of Tennessee, Martin

This session presents innovative approaches adopted by several institutions of higher education to cope with dwindling resources and maintain quality foreign language instruction at all levels and fosters open dialogue among roundtable presenters and audience members on this issue.

Chaucer's Futures

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Chaucer. Presiding: Kellie Robertson, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Speakers: Christopher C. Baswell, Barnard Coll.; Heather Blatt, Fordham Univ., Bronx; Holly Crocker, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia; Darryl Ellison, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

What will it mean to study Chaucer in the twenty-first century?

The Americanization of Comparative Literature, the Comparatization of American Studies

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association of Departments and Programs of Comparative Literature. Presiding: Caroline D. Eckhardt, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Intercontinental American Literature," Waïl S. Hassan, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "Incomparably Concentric: America and Comparatism," Djelal Kadir, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Transamerican Studies and American Comparativisms," Silvia Spitta, Dartmouth Coll.

4. "What American Studies Can Learn from Comparative Literature," Ali Behdad, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Disability in the Composition Class: Inclusion and Adaptation

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession and the Division on the Teaching of Writing. Presiding: Joshua Benjamin Lukin, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

1. "Waiting for Godot: Autism Spectrum Students in the Writing Classroom," Carolyn Sofia, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York

2. "Writing Strategy and Stutterers: What Composition Can Learn from Dysfluent Speakers," Craig A. Meyer, Ohio Univ., Athens

3. "Talking about Ourselves: Disability Disclosure in the Writing Classroom," Daniel Preston, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York

Respondent: Donna Strickland, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

Language Acquisition Issues in Romance Languages

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Comparative Romance Linguistics. Presiding: Roslyn Sue Raney, Coll. of San Mateo, CA

1. "Acquisition of Portuguese Nasal Vowels by Speakers of Spanish as L1/L2," Kendra Douglas, Western Washington Univ.

2. "Comparative Analysis of L1 and L2 Processing Effects of Spanish Past Tense," Eva Rodríguez González, Miami Univ., Oxford

Ireland and the Politics of Language

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Conference for Irish Studies. Presiding: Richard Russell, Baylor Univ.

1. "Muse Energy: Releasing and Reinscribing the Spéirbhean," Laura B. O'Connor, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "'English Is Dead': Assassinating English in Finnegans Wake," Spurgeon W. Thompson, Fordham Univ., Bronx

3. "'Johnny, I Hardly Knew You!': Sean O'Faolain, the Gaelic League, and Debates over Language and Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century," Kelly Matthews, Framingham State Univ.

Pirandello and Cinema: Adaptations, Reexaminations, and Representations

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Pirandello Society of America. Presiding: John P. Welle, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "Pirandello and the Philosophic Eye of Cinema," Federico Pacchioni, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

2. "George Fitzmaurice's As You Desire Me (1932): Theatrical versus Cinematic Horizons of Expectations and Greta Garbo's Elusive Identity," Claudia Consolati, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "La canzone dell'amore: Adapting Pirandello to Fascist Propaganda," Paolo Campolonghi, New York Univ.

4. "Screening Decadence: Vittorio De Sica's Adriana Takes a Trip," Lisa Sarti, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

For abstracts, visit www.pirandellosocietyofamerica.org.

Nabokov as Travel Writer

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society. Presiding: Galya Diment, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Time Travelers: Inspiration, Space-Time, and the Narrative Structure of Return in Nabokov's Fiction," Frederick Coye Heard, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "Nabokov's Switzerlands: Discovery, Recovery, and Ayn Rand's Atlantis," Shoshana Milgram Knapp, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

3. "Free at Last: The Heroic Escape of Timofey Pnin," Irina Rodimtseva, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

Respondent: Zoran Kuzmanovich, Davidson Coll.

For abstracts, visit web.utk.edu/~sblackwe/nabtrav.htm.

Austria and Globalization from Multinational Empire through the European Union

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Modern Austrian Literature and Culture Association. Presiding: Katherine Arens, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Vom Vielvoelkerstaat zur Europaeischen Union, oder die Dekonstruktion des 'habsburgerischen Mythos' von Franz Grillparzer ueber Ingeborg Bachmann bis zu Elfriede Jelinek," Robert Pichl, Univ. of Vienna

2. "'A Very Fragile Identity': Austrian Globalization in Elfriede Jelinek's Gier," Ian Thomas Fleishman, Harvard Univ.

3. "Heimat and Globalization in Recent Austrian Film," Imke Meyer, Bryn Mawr Coll.

For abstracts, write to hschreck@uvm.edu.

A Creative Conversation with Richard Van Camp: Writing, Language, and Indigenous Expression

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Robert Warrior, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Speaker: Richard Van Camp, Univ. of Alberta

Richard Van Camp is an accomplished and innovative writer who brings the language and experience of the Tlicho people of the Northwest Territory into his fiction and children's books. He writes about the resiliency of Indigenous communities but is not afraid to expose and explore the dysfunctions that have come with colonization. His talents are a rare combination of exuberant humor, stark vision, writerly lyricism, and hard-edged wisdom. Links to the author’s work, including some to his short fiction, are available at www.nativewiki.org/Richard_Van_Camp.

Learned Journals and Libraries: Knowledge Economies and Economics of Knowledge

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals and the Discussion Group on Libraries and Research in Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Sarah G. Wenzel, Univ. of Chicago

1. "The Cost of Knowledge for Scholarly Editors," Alan Rauch, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

2. "Collaborative Economies: Tools and Strategies for Scholars and Libraries," Harriett Green, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Cohesion and Chaos: The Distribution of Scholarly Knowledge in a Changing Library Paradigm," William Thompson, Western Illinois Univ.

Respondent: Robert H. Kieft, Occidental Coll.

Literary City in South Asia

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the South Asian Literary Association. Presiding: Rashmi Bhatnagar, Univ. of Pittsburgh

1. "Urban Derive and Muslim Identity in Altaf Tyrewala's No God in Sight," Gautam Premnath, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Twilight and Enlightenment in Delhi: Urdu, English, Sexuality, Modernity," Sonam Singh, Cornell Univ.

3. "A City That Has Multiple Aliases: Suketu Mehta's Revision of Bombay," Sarah Harrison, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Respondent: Kanika Batra, Texas Tech Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.southasianliteraryassociation.org.

Digital Narratives and Gaming for Teaching Language and Literature

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology and the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Barbara Lafford, Arizona State Univ.

1. "Narrative Expression and Scientific Method in Online Gaming Worlds," Steven Thorne, Portland State Univ.

2. "Designing Narratives: A Framework for Digital Game-Mediated L2 Literacies Development," Jonathon Reinhardt, Univ. of Arizona; Julie Sykes, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

3. "Close Playing, Paired Playing: A Practicum," Edmond Chang, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Timothy Welsh, Loyola Univ., New Orleans

Respondent: Dave McAlpine, Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock

Modernism and International Language: Esperanto, Yiddish, and Translatese

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Eric R. J. Hayot, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Esperantic Modernism and the Babel of Human Rights," Nico Israel, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "Yiddish Internationalism and the Poetics of Diaspora," Allison Schachter, Vanderbilt Univ.

3. "Translatese: Modernism after World Literature," Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

A Comparative View of Passion and Affect in Early Modern Tragedy

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session

1. "Affect, Diagnosis, and the Uses of Tragedy," Russ Leo, Princeton Univ.

2. "Between Poetics and Polemics: Passion and Catharsis in Vondel's Biblical Drama, 1640–70," Freya Sierhuis, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität

3. "Passion, Not Character," Blair G. Hoxby, Stanford Univ.

For abstracts, write to bhoxby@stanford.edu.

Thing and Symbol in Everyday Life and Narration

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Noam Scheindlin, LaGuardia Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Everything Watches: The Tin Drum and the Aesthetics of 'New Objectivity,'" Joyce Piell Wexler, Loyola Univ., Chicago

2. "Georges Perec, a Man Asleep, Is You," Peter Consenstein, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

3. "Transitivity and Material Cultures: Toward an Aesthetics of Literary Things," Virginia Piper, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

For abstracts, write to nscheindlin@lagcc.cuny.edu after 15 Dec.

Cultural Activism and the Uses of Maya Literature

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Kirkland, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Paul M. Worley, Univ. of North Dakota

1. "Ixoquib Tzij: Maya Women Poetics in La rueda by Maya Cu Choc," Alicia Ivonne Estrada, California State Univ., Northridge

2. "My Language, My Weapon: Language and Identity in Waldemar Noh Tzec's Noh balam 'Large Jaguar'," Paul M. Worley

3. "A Feminist Revision of the Popol Wuj in Cherríe Moraga's Heart of Earth," Melissa Birkhofer, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Respondent: Emilio Del Valle-Escalante, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Human Dignity and Reading the Renaissance

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Susan K. Byrne, Yale Univ.

1. "The Dignity of Man in Sixteenth-Century Europe: The Works of Pérez de Oliva," Elena Pellús Pérez, Yale Univ.

2. "La consideración del hombre: El Libro segundo del espejo del perfecto príncipe cristiano de Francisco de Monzón," Carlota Fernández Travieso, Univ. of Coruña

3. "Erasmus and the Kantian Erasmus: Two Ways to Construct the Dignity of Man," Daniel Lorca, Oakland Univ.

Media Women of the Belle Epoque

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Rachel L. Mesch, Yeshiva Univ., NY

1. "D'une scène à l'autre: Marguerite Durand ou les forces cachées d'une ingénue," Michèle Magnin, Univ. of San Diego

2. "Vers la lumière: Séverine, Social Justice, and the Dreyfus Affair," Kathryne Adair, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "Cinderella Powder, Poet Queens, and the Oriental Authoress: Lucie-Delarue Mardrus and Femina," Rachel L. Mesch

4. "Colette, ou l'apologie du journalisme myope," Marie-Eve Thérenty, Univ. of Montpellier III

For abstracts, visit home.sandiego.edu/~mmagnin/.

Evolution without Progress: Late-Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: George L. Levine, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Process, Not Progress," Nicholas Gaskill, Univ. of Chicago

2. "Surviving E. B. Tylor: The Horrors of Lovecraft’s History," Devin Griffiths, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Broken Chains, Missing Links," Rachael Nichols, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Literature and Secularization

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Religion. Presiding: Susannah Brietz Monta, Univ. of Notre Dame

Speakers: Lori Branch, Univ. of Iowa; John Cox, Hope Coll.; Tracy Fessenden, Arizona State Univ.; William Franke, Vanderbilt Univ.; Colin Lovell Jager, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Michael W. Kaufmann, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

The recent religious turn in contemporary Continental philosophy and the reconsideration of secularization theses in the social sciences have created new opportunities for scholars to rethink the secular. Our roundtable will comprise scholars working in literary-historical fields from the seventeenth century to the present. Each scholar will present a position statement; an open discussion with the audience will follow.

Learning to Connect the Multiple Fields of an English Department

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Christine R. Farris, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

Speakers: Dale Marie Bauer, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; David Bleich, Univ. of Rochester; Deborah H. Holdstein, Columbia Coll., IL; Steven Mailloux, Loyola Marymount Univ.; John L. Schilb, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

This roundtable aims to help graduate students and junior faculty members in English become integrated into their departments. To feel at home there, they must figure out how to connect their own specializations to their colleagues' fields. The panelists will briefly suggest ways to meet this challenge, drawing on their long experience with English departments and on their personal efforts as scholars to connect various fields.

Asynchronous Empire

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Mike Frangos, Umeå Univ.

1. "Time Difference: Temporality and Decolonization," Peter James Hitchcock, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "Asynchronous Pageants: Colonial Air Control in the 1920s," Paul K. Saint-Amour, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "The Time of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Empire, Masculinity, and the Afterlife of Late-Victorian Adventure Fiction," Ryan Fong, Univ. of California, Davis

For abstracts, visit mikefrangos.com.

The Cultural Place of Nineteenth-Century Poetry

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Charles P. LaPorte, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Lyric and Music at the Fin de Siècle: The Cultural Place of Song," Emily M. Harrington, Penn State Univ., University Park

2. "What Can 'Digital Reading' Tell Us about the Material Places of Victorian Poetry?" Natalie M. Houston, Univ. of Houston, University Park

3. "Olympics 2012 and Victorian Poetry for All Time," Margaret Linley, Simon Fraser Univ.

Religion and Spirituality in the Long Poems of Kenneth Rexroth

Friday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Brent Newsom, Texas Tech Univ.

1. "'Salvation Equals Autonomy': Rexroth's Religious Dialectic in The Phoenix and the Tortoise," Brent Newsom

2. "The 'Gnostic Erotic' and 'Communities of Love': Rexroth and Gnosticism," Joshua Pederson, Boston Univ.

3. "The 'Holy . . . Heap of Dust': Contemplative Activism in The Heart's Garden, the Garden's Heart," Rachelle Katz Lerner, Toronto, ON

Respondent: Linda Hamalian, William Paterson Univ.

For abstracts, write to brent.newsom@ttu.edu.

Animals, Machines, Forces of Nature: Alternative Agencies in Arthurian Literature

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Arthurian Literature. Presiding: Will Hasty, Univ. of Florida

1. "Guardians of the Past or Portents of the Future? Sepulchral Automata in the Prose Lancelot and Earlier Romances," Naomi Howell, Univ. of Exeter

2. "Malory's Questing Beast and the Geography of the Arthurian World," Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

3. "Human versus Nonhuman: Collective Hybridity in Emilia Pardo Bazán's The Last Fairy," Lisa Nalbone, Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando

New Temporalities of Old Age

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Age Studies. Presiding: Erin Lamb, Hiram Coll.

1. "P. K. Page and Spatialized Time: The Here/There of Aging," Suzanne Bailey, Trent Univ.

2. "Old Age and Future Science in McEwan's Saturday," Katherine Skwarczek, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "No Future? The Curious Temporalities of Benjamin Button," Cynthia R. Port, Coastal Carolina Univ.

A Creative Conversation with the Chinese Poet Xi Chuan

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Grand B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Christopher M. Lupke, Washington State Univ., Pullman

Speaker: Xi Chuan, Central Acad. of Fine Arts, Beijing

This session highlights the work of the renowned contemporary Chinese poet Xi Chuan and consists of a conversation between him and Christopher Lupke as well as questions and comments from the audience. Xi Chuan will read some of his poems. The session will be conducted in English.

Why Neo–Slave Narratives in the Twenty-First Century?

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Maria Helena Lima, State Univ. of New York, Geneseo

1. "Imoinda and the Task of Double Writing; or, She Who Tells the Story of the Gendered Signifying Minority," Assimina Karavanta, Univ. of Athens

2. "Writing Words, Wearing Wounds: Race, Gender, and Memory in a Puerto Rican Neo–Slave Narrative," Radost Rangelova, Gettysburg Coll.

3. "Of Moan and Stutter: M. Nourbese Philips's Hauntological Zong!," James D. B. McCorkle, Hobart and William Smith Colls.

Respondent: Maria Helena Lima

For abstracts, visit www.geneseo.edu/~lima.

Digital Pedagogy

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Grand A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Katherine D. Harris, San José State Univ.

Speakers: Sheila T. Cavanagh, Emory Univ.; Elizabeth Chang, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia; Lori A. Emerson, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Adeline Koh, Richard Stockton Coll. of New Jersey; John Lennon, Univ. of South Florida Polytechnic; Jessica C. Murphy, Univ. of Texas, Dallas; Kevin Quarmby, Shakespeare's Globe Trust; Katherine Singer, Mount Holyoke Coll.; Sara Steger, Univ. of Georgia; Roger Whitson, Georgia Inst. of Tech.

Discussions about digital projects and digital tools often focus on research goals. For this electronic roundtable, we will instead demonstrate how these digital resources, tools, and projects have been integrated into undergraduate and graduate curricula.

Sacred and Unsacred in Early Modern England

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 612, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Nigel S. Smith, Princeton Univ.

1. "The Double Tongue: The Turn and Return of Religious Language in Shakespeare," Brian Cummings, Univ. of Sussex

2. "Denomination, Demystification, and the Challenge of Devotional Lyric," Molly Murray, Columbia Univ.

3. "Literature and Dismantled Faith in Milton and His Contemporaries," Nigel S. Smith

For abstracts, write to nsmith@princeton.edu.

Zombie Modernism

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jessica Burstein, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "James Joyce and Zombies," Sean Latham, Univ. of Tulsa

2. "'Rather a Turn for Corpses': Dorothy L. Sayers, Detective Fiction, and the Evidence of Death," Matthew Levay, Harvard Univ.

3. "The Zombie Turn and the Ruined Horizon," Aaron Jaffe, Univ. of Louisville

The Body in Motion: Gesture in Turn-of-the-Century American Literature and Culture

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 617, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lindsay Reckson, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Stillness Is a Move: Helen Keller and the Kinesthetics of Autobiography," Erica Fretwell, Duke Univ.

2. "Frozen Evanescence: Writing Plains Indian Sign Talk, circa 1880," Brian Hochman, Georgetown Univ.

3. "Muscle and Melody: Locating Gesture in the Archives," Lindsay Reckson

Respondent: Carrie Jaurès Noland, Univ. of California, Irvine

The Mythic South: Mythology and Materialism of the American South

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. Presiding: Daniel Cross Turner, Coastal Carolina Univ.

1. "Cormac McCarthy and the Myth of the Irish South," Bryan Giemza, Randolph-Macon Coll.

2. "Myth as Therapy in Lee Smith's Oral History," Thomas F. Haddox, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

3. "The Undead, Popular Culture, and Southern Figuration," Taylor Hagood, Florida Atlantic Univ.

4. "Totem to Fetish: The Mythos of Primitivism in William Faulkner's Native Fiction," Daniel Cross Turner

For abstracts, visit sssl.blogs.wm.edu/.

Queering the Indigene: Rearticulating Intersections in Postcolonial, Indigenous, and Queer Studies

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Andrew van der Vlies, Univ. of London, Queen Mary

1. "Telling It Slant," John Charles Hawley, Santa Clara Univ.

2. "'Punctured and Repunctured, as with Nails': Queer Blasphemy and Cannibal Folklore in Tomson Highway's Kiss of the Fur Queen," Nancy Kang, Clarkson Univ.

3. "Negotiating Lesbian, Feminist, and Indigenous Affiliations in the Work of Mujeres Creando," Melissa Gonzalez, Davidson Coll.

Provoking Literary History: Richard Maxwell's Critical Legacies

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robert Lawrence Caserio, Penn State Univ., University Park

Speakers: Robert Lawrence Caserio; Ian Duncan, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Deidre Shauna Lynch, Univ. of Toronto; Marina MacKay, Washington Univ. in St. Louis; Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Katie Trumpener, Yale Univ.

Richard Maxwell's untimely death in 2010 cut short the career of an innovative literary historian. Maxwell's address to the novel broke away from the boundaries that confine scholars to nation-centered contexts and that also reduce literary history to intellectually inhibiting period constructs. The roundtable assesses how Maxwell's approach to literary history and to history stimulates current scholarship.

Literature and Medicine: Reconfiguring the World in Early Modern Italy, France, and England

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Dorothea Heitsch, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Syphilitic Poetics: Fracastoro's Literary Encounters with Syphilis," Sarah Parker, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Reconsidering the Humoral Body: The Effect of the Doctrine of Subtlety on Early Modern English Metaphoricity," William Henry Spates, Qatar Univ.

3. "Dissecting Monsters: Early Modern 'Chirurgions' and Medical Authority," Sara Orning, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

For abstracts, write to dheitsch@unc.edu.

Representing the City across Cultures

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Romance Literary Relations. Presiding: Andrea Baldi, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Windows on the Fin de Siècle City: Writing Women in Zola and Pardo Bazán," Jessica Tanner, Harvard Univ.

2. "Celebrating the City: Carlos Drummond de Andrade’s Crónicas and Cultural Memory," Ana Prata, Univ. of Lisbon

3. "Familiar Gazes, Foreign Cities: The Deambulations of Jacques Réda," Lynn S. Anderson, State Univ. of West Georgia

4. "Havana's Sexual Geographies in Contraband of Shadows by Antonio José Ponte," Elena Valdez, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

For abstracts, write to abaldi@rci.rutgers.edu.

Scrittura e cultura in movimento: Italophone Literatures, Literatures of Italian Diaspora

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Italian American Literature. Presiding: Michael A. Antonucci, Keene State Coll.

1. "Needles as Metaphorical Pens: Migratory Women's Work in Italian American Narratives," MaryJo Bona, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York

2. "Passing for Italian American: Between Whiteness and Blackness and Other Border Crossings in Kym Ragusa's The Skin between Us and Fuori/Outside," Jessica L. Maucione, Gonzaga Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.aihaweb.org/italianamericanliterature.htm after 21 Dec.

In Honor of Catharine R. Stimpson on the Occasion of Receiving the ADE Francis Andrew March Award

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 607, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of English. Presiding: Thomas Hurley, Diablo Valley Coll., CA

Speakers: Donald E. Hall, Lehigh Univ.; David Laurence, MLA; Catharine R. Stimpson, New York Univ.

2011 ADE President Thomas Hurley will present the ADE Francis Andrew March Award for Distinguished Service to the Profession to Catharine R. Stimpson.

Scholarship, Censorship, and Academic Change: The Case of A. K. Ramanujan

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: David Damrosch, Harvard Univ.

Speakers: David Damrosch; Vinay Dharwadker, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Niko Pfund, Oxford University Press; Sheldon Pollock, Columbia Univ.; Paula Richman, Oberlin Coll.

Expanding the Language Mission across the Disciplines: A Session in Honor of John Grandin

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the ADFL Executive Committee. Presiding: Dawn E. Bratsch-Prince, Iowa State Univ.

1. "Maximizing the Impact of Integrated Language Learning across Disciplines," Sigrid Berka, Univ. of Rhode Island

2. "Against All Odds: The Success of John Grandin's Rhode Island Model," Michael Nugent, National Security Education Program

3. "From the Smallest State to the Big World," Alaric Bobby, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

"An Injury to One": Fighting the Exploitation of Graduate Student Labor

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession. Presiding: Dan Colson, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Speakers: Royal Bonde-Griggs, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Dan Colson; Robert Henn, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; MaryAnne Laurico, Queen's Univ.; James H. S. Searle, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Ariel Wetzel, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

While graduate students have long been a source of cheap labor, recent attacks on organized labor, along with the scapegoating of educators, demonstrate the renewed need for a discussion of the experiences--both commonplace and novel--of graduate student exploitation. This roundtable includes narratives from those combating exploitative practices on the ground and explores strategies for fighting them at the local, state, national, and global levels.

Shared Governance: Who's Running This Place?

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities. Presiding: June Howard, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Speakers: Susan Ashley, Colorado Coll.; Stacey Lee Donohue, Central Oregon Community Coll.; John W. Mowitt, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Elliott Visconsi, Univ. of Notre Dame; Teri Yamada, California State Univ., Long Beach

The topic of shared governance has become a hot-button issue. The panelists represent perspectives from different institutions. They have served in administration, as union leaders, and as elected representatives of the faculty; they will discuss the history of shared governance, current legal and practical challenges, and how to get faculty members engaged. Audience members will be invited to share their perspectives and broaden the discussion.

Food and Culture: Food as Metaphor

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Kirkland, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Jocelyne Kolb, Smith Coll.

1. "Feasts and Beans: Jean Paul's Literary Menu," Christoph Zeller, Vanderbilt Univ.

2. "Jean Paul's Recipe for Success: Figures of Food and Authorial Image," Seán Williams, Univ. of Oxford, Jesus Coll.

3. "The Nation at Table: The Politics and Poetics of Hospitality in Arnim's Tischgesellschaft and Isabella von Aegypten," Nathan Magnusson, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Romantic Number(s)

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period. Presiding: Maureen Noelle McLane, New York Univ.

1. "John Galt's Logics of Worlds," Matthew F. Wickman, Brigham Young Univ., UT

2. "Romantic Modifications," Marjorie Levinson, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

3. "Number, Medium, Nature: Wordsworth and Babbage Compose the Universe," James Brooke-Smith, Univ. of Ottawa

Language Learning and Identity Construction

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics. Presiding: Deborah Arteaga, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas

1. "Identity Transformation and Transcultural Hospitality in Transnational Learning Environments," Sébastien Dubreil, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

2. "Language Learner Identity Construction in the Study-Abroad Context," Eva Dessein, Vanderbilt Univ.

3. "Becoming Spanish Speakers in Early California: Memory, History, and Identity in Language Learning," Robert Train, Sonoma State Univ.

4. "Construction of Disciplinary Identity across Contexts: The Case of Carlos," Elizabeth Tremmel, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

For abstracts, write to virginia.m.scott@vanderbilt.edu.

The Ottoman Eighteenth Cenury

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Rajani Sudan, Southern Methodist Univ.

1. "The Unfeminine Politics of the Turkish Harem in Hannah Cowley's A Day in Turkey; or, The Russian Slaves (1791)," Humberto Garcia, Vanderbilt Univ.

2. "The Ottoman Empire and the State of Things," Amy Witherbee, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville

3. "Horses, Ottomans, and the Enlightenment," Donna Landry, Univ. of Kent

Animals and Plants

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry and Prose. Presiding: Steven Wagschal, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

1. "Stewardship and Dominion: Animal Associations and the Amelioration of Hierarchy in the Spanish Empire," Abel Alves, Ball State Univ.

2. "Representing Jacob's Livestock in Early Modern Spanish Literature and Painting," Javier Irigoyen-Garcia, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Flowers, Their Afterlives, and the Literature of Devotion," John Slater, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

Russian Literature in the Humanities: Perspectives on Teaching

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the International Dostoevsky Society. Presiding: Susan McReynolds, Northwestern Univ.

Speakers: Paul Joseph Contino, Pepperdine Univ.; Robin Feuer Miller, Brandeis Univ.; Seamas O'Driscoll, Northwestern Univ.; Cathy L. Popkin, Columbia Univ.; Lina L. Steiner, Univ. of Chicago; Bruce Ward, Laurentian Univ.; Ralph Wood, Baylor Univ.

The Russian canon belongs to world literature; it also belongs to a specific faith tradition. In this roundtable, we address questions such as, What are the challenges and rewards of teaching works by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov outside Slavic departments? What happens to their writings, and to our understanding of literature and Christianity, when we teach their works in contexts such as humanities courses or as elements of a Christian heritage?

La force des femmes: Sources of Strength for Women in French-Language Literature and Film

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by Women in French. Presiding: Alison Rice, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "L'amitié entre femmes comme source de force dans la fiction des romancières des lumières," Isabelle Tremblay, Collège Militaire Royal du Canada

2. "The Force of Music in George Sand: A Path to Empowerment," Arline E. Cravens, Saint Louis Univ.

3. "'Elles étaient cinq'; or, How Female Friendship Survives Trauma," Miléna Santoro, Georgetown Univ.

4. "Anna Gavalda's Fragile Women: The Empowerment of Self-Sacrifice," Vera Klekovkina, Scripps Coll.

Toward a Standards-Based Research Agenda

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Martha Abbott, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

1. "Recommendations from the Standards Impact Grant Task Force," June K. Phillips, Weber State Univ.

2. "Establishing a Research Agenda: Filling the Gaps," Eileen Glisan, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Implementing a Standards-Based Curriculum for Higher Education," Dave McAlpine, Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock

For abstracts, visit www.actfl.org.

The Material History of Spider-Man

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Comics and Graphic Narratives. Presiding: Jonathan W. Gray, John Jay Coll. of Criminal Justice, City Univ. of New York

1. "Written in the Body: Spider-Man, Venom, and the Specter of Biopower," Ben Bolling, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Out of Character: Traces of the Real Spider-Man," Samantha Close, Univ. of California, Irvine

3. "Tangled Web: Spider-Man’s Discontinuous Continuity," Charles Hatfield, California State Univ., Northridge

Respondent: Danny Fingeroth, New York, NY

For abstracts, visit graphicnarratives.org/ after 1 Dec.

New Approaches to Civil War Poetry: Dickinson, Whitman, Melville

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Melville Society and the Emily Dickinson International Society. Presiding: Joseph Fruscione, Georgetown Univ.; Tyler Brent Hoffman, Rutgers Univ., Camden

Speakers: Stephen Hodin, Boston Univ.; Cristanne Miller, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York; Monica Pelaez, Saint Cloud State Univ.; Jennifer H. Schell, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks; Jillian Spivey, Cornell Univ.

Dickinson, Whitman, and Melville wrote war poetry that recent critical readings have scrutinized. This roundtable’s goal is to investigate--as interactively as possible--the growing interest in parsing these poets’ aesthetic, political, and formal responses. Through a variety of critical viewpoints, we invite the audience to participate in thinking through how critical approaches to Civil War poetry have evolved and will continue to offer new insights.

For more information, visit melvillesociety.org/en/conferences-and-events/mla-conference.

Brecht Reading / Reading Brecht

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the International Brecht Society and the Division on Drama. Presiding: Marc David Silberman, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "The Archive of Antiquity: Brecht's Trial of Lucullus," Larson Powell, Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City

2. "The Theater of Legal Opinion: Brecht's Adaptation of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure," K. Scott Baker, Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City

3. "The Work of Reading: Marlowe's and Brecht's Edward the Second," Kristina Mendicino, Yale Univ.

Respondent: Paula Hanssen, Webster Univ.

New Approaches to the Law and Literature of the Nineteenth-Century United States

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century American Literature and the Discussion Group on Law as Literature. Presiding: Meredith L. McGill, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Martyr Literature," Caleb Smith, Yale Univ.

2. "Race Slavery, American Law, and United States Literature," Jeannine DeLombard, Univ. of Toronto

3. "On Parallel Tracks: Plessy v. Ferguson and the Chinese Invasion Narrative," Edlie L. Wong, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Queer Method

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research and the Division on Gay Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Jude V. Nixon, Salem State Univ.

1. "Clearly Queer? Reading Virginia Woolf and Jeanette Winterson," Laura Green, Northeastern Univ.

2. "The Queerness of Early America: Reading Heteronormativity before Heterosexuality," Zachary Lamm, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

3. "On Failing to Make the Past Present," Stephen M. Best, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Representations of Islam in Francophone African Literature

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Francophone Literatures and Cultures and the Division on African Literatures. Presiding: Anne Donadey, San Diego State Univ.; Alain Lawo Sukam, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

1. "Pluralism and Reform within Radical Monotheism and Novelistic Fiction," Donald R. Wehrs, Auburn Univ., Auburn

2. "Narrating the Prophet's Life: Mohammed in North African Novels," Carine Bourget, Univ. of Arizona

3. "Visions of Islam in Recent Algerian Fiction," Susan Ireland, Grinnell Coll.

4. "Shaping Futures and Feminisms: Qur'anic Schools in West African Francophone Fiction," Shirin E. Edwin, Sam Houston State Univ.

New Perspectives on Latin American Studies

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Latin American Literature from Independence to 1900. Presiding: Graciela Montaldo, Columbia Univ.

1. "Taking Stock: Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Economics," Ericka Beckman, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "Nature in Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature: Another Sublime Turn of the Screw," Carlos Abreu Mendoza, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "Literacy, Subjectivity, and the Crisis of the Novel in Nineteenth-Century Latin America," Abraham Acosta, Univ. of Arizona

Old Labor and New Media

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 608, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Alison Shonkwiler, Rhode Island Coll.

1. "America Needs Indians: Representations of Native Americans in Counterculture Narrative and the Roots of Digital Utopianism," Lisa Nakamura, Univ of Illinois, Urbana

2. "The Eyes of Real Labor and the Illusions of Virtual Reality," Matt Goodwin, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

3. "Digital Voices: Representations of Migrant Workers in Dubai and Los Angeles," Anne Cong-Huyen, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Respondent: Seth Perlow, Cornell Univ.

Assessing What Was African American Literature?; or, The State of the Field in the New Millennium

Friday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Melissa Asher Daniels, Northwestern Univ.; Gregory Laski, Northwestern Univ.

Speakers: Adam Francis Bradley, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Russ Castronovo, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Soyica Diggs Colbert, Dartmouth Coll.; John Ernest, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown; Sharon Patricia Holland, Duke Univ.

Respondent: Kenneth W. Warren, Univ. of Chicago

In his provocative new book, What Was African American Literature? (2011), Kenneth W. Warren argues that African American literature ended with the legal abrogation of Jim Crow. This roundtable brings together a diverse group of scholars of African American literature to discuss this claim and explore its implications for the field in the new millennium.

The Presidential Address

Friday, 6:45 p.m., Metropolitan A, Sheraton

Presiding: Rosemary G. Feal, MLA

Speakers: Rosemary G. Feal; Russell A. Berman, Stanford Univ.; Russell A. Berman; Russell A. Berman

1. Report of the Executive Director, Rosemary G. Feal

2. Russell A. Berman, Stanford Univ., MLA President, will announce the winner of the MLA Award for Lifetime Scholarly Achievement, Fredric Jameson, Duke Univ.

3. Statement of Appreciation to Patricia Yaeger, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, editor of PMLA (2006–11), by Russell A. Berman

4. The Presidential Address, Russell A. Berman. In his address, Berman calls for robust advocacy by MLA members in the face of cultural and political resistance to the MLA's core mission. To achieve our goals, we must recommit ourselves to an education agenda centered on universal bilingualism and a vigorous engagement with literature and to a profound restructuring of graduate education.

Reception immediately following.

Cash Bar Arranged by the American Literature Section

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 211, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 206, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature and the Division on Seventeenth-Century French Literature

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Cash Bar for Alumni, Faculty Members, and Current Students

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand D, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the Penn State University Department of English

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 203, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Department of French and Italian at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Reception Arranged by the Stanford University English Department and Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 204, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Rutgers University Department of English

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 201, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Reception Arranged by the School of Criticism and Theory

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand C, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the University of Toronto

Friday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 205, WSCC

Kafka and the Holocaust

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Marie Luise Caputo-Mayr, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

Speakers: Kathi Diamant, San Diego State Univ.; Jeffrey A. Grossman, Univ. of Virginia; Alexander Erik Larsen, Univ. of Notre Dame; Dagmar C. G. Lorenz, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago; Joseph W. Moser, Washington and Jefferson Coll.; Eva B. Revesz, Denison Univ.; Saskia Ziolkowski, Univ. of California, Berkeley

This roundtable will address historiobiographic issues, including the confiscated papers from D. Diamant's home and Primo Levi's Trial translation, as well as Kafka's literary legacy: Aichinger's Jewish identity crisis, Schindel's Born-Where, and countermyths to European enlightenment.

For abstracts, visit www.kafkasocietyofamerica.org.

The New Normal: The Changing Nature of the Academic Job Search

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of English. Presiding: Donald E. Hall, Lehigh Univ.

Speakers: Susan Miller, Santa Fe Coll.; Maureen T. Reddy, Rhode Island Coll.; Sandra K. Stanley, California State Univ., Northridge; Erika J. Wright, Univ. of Southern California

With due attention to different institutional types, panelists will discuss how the job search has changed as departments adjust to emerging trends in interviewing and job offers and as demand for scholars in different fields shifts.

Codes, Conventions, Connotations: Intertextuality in Modern Arabic Literature

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Gretchen Head, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Al-Tuhāmī al-Wazzānī's al-Zāwiyah and the Roots of Modern Moroccan Narrative," Gretchen Head

2. "Memories of a Soul: Recouping Existence in Mamduh Azam's Qasr al-Matar," Alexa Firat, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

3. "Landscapes of Contemporary Iraqi Poetry," Mara Naaman, Williams Coll.

4. "Absence Was Everywhere: Translation and the Loss of Intertextuality," Anthony Alessandrini, Kingsborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

For abstracts, write to intertextualitymla@gmail.com after 1 Dec.

Flexible Authorship: Recontextualizing Sui Sin Far / Edith Eaton

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 617, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Yu-Fang Cho, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Where Is Asian America? Edith Eaton, Sui Sin Far, and Regionalism," June Howard, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. "Winking at Irresponsible Journalism: Sui Sin Far’s The Success of a Mistake," Jean Marie Lutes, Villanova Univ.

3. "Eaton in the Pacific: Alaska Widow," Mary A. M. Chapman, Univ. of British Columbia

Dada and the Polemics of Sense Perception

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Abigail Susik, Willamette Univ.

1. "Visual Dada: Subversion in Dadaist Film," Oliver C. Speck, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

2. "Cutting Up Einstein: On the Dada Rejection of Relativity," Arndt Niebisch, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

3. "Science, Perception, and the Avant-Garde," Thomas O. Haakenson, Minneapolis Coll. of Art and Design

Respondent: Abigail Susik

Chinese Narrative, World Literature: The Appeal and the Peril of Being Worldly

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Jiwei Xiao, Fairfield Univ.

Speakers: Xiaomei Chen, Univ. of California, Davis; Ya-Chen Chen, Clark Univ.; Eric R. J. Hayot, Penn State Univ., University Park; Wendy Larson, Univ. of Oregon; Jie Lu, Univ. of the Pacific; Xin Ning, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Jiwei Xiao

Starting from the premise that all literatures today are more or less part of the larger international system, borrowing and loaning at the same time, this panel addresses one of the central issues concerning world literature, the inequalities of being worldly, by thinking through the position and role of modern Chinese narrative within world literature today.

For abstracts, write to jiweixiao@gmail.com after 29 Dec.

Tyrants in Early English Drama

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Rebecca Bushnell, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "'Agaynst the Right': The Tyrants of Chester Cycle," Heather Mitchell-Buck, Hood Coll.

2. "Tyrannous Justice in Cambyses and Shakespeare," Julia M. Garrett, Univ. of New England

3. "'The Tyrant . . . Tires Me an Aunt': Complaint, Tyranny, and The Winter's Tale," Donald Jellerson, Univ. of Wisconsin, Whitewater

For abstracts, visit faculty.une.edu/cas/jgarrett1/MLA2012Tyrants.html after 1 Dec.

The Gift of Literature: Recent Developments in Gift Theory

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robert W. Epstein, Fairfield Univ.

1. "'Fy on a Thousand Pound!': Toward an Ethic of Generosity in the Franklin's Tale," Robert W. Epstein

2. "Uncounterfeit Money: Time, Grammar, and the Gift," Daniel Williams, Harvard Univ.

3. "Toward the Pathological Gift: Calculation and Expenditure in Detective Fiction," Jeffrey Salyer, National Univ. of Tainan

For abstracts, write to repstein@fairfield.edu.

How Seattle Changed Comics

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Comics and Graphic Narratives. Presiding: Hillary L. Chute, Univ. of Chicago

1. "Ernie Pook and the Emerald City: Lynda Barry's Seattle," Susan E. Kirtley, Portland State Univ.

2. "Underground Aesthetics Turned Alternative Critique: Reconsidering Roberta Gregory's Naughty Bits," JoAnne Ruvoli, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Serial Trauma: Awaiting Charles Burns's X'ed Out," Christopher Pizzino, Univ. of Georgia

For abstracts, visit graphicnarratives.org/ after 1 Dec.

Fin de Siècle Pedagogies

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Helena Gurfinkel, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville

1. "Pedagogy and the Novel: Henry James, Walter Besant, and Literary Education," Christiane Gannon, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

2. "How to Avoid the Lure of the Perversions: Krafft-Ebing's Psychopathia Sexualis as Public-Health Pedagogy," Daniel E. Bivona, Arizona State Univ.

3. "The Other Renaissance: Teaching the 1890s in African American Literary Culture," Andrea N. Williams, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

The Screenplay in Literary Studies

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Robert A. Jackson, Univ. of Tulsa

1. "Skyscraper Fantasy; or, My Woody Allen Problem: Architectural Projections and the Screenplay," Robert A. Jackson

2. "The Screenplay as Opera Libretto: Graham Greene's Collaborations with Carol Reed," Matthew Paul Carlson, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "William Faulkner at Twentieth Century-Fox," Sarah R. Gleeson-White, Univ. of Sydney

For abstracts, write to sarah.gleeson-white@sydney.edu.au after 20 Dec.

The Transnational Trajectories and Poetics of Keorapetse Kgositsile

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Stephane P. Robolin, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "The 'Practice of Diaspora' of Keorapetse Kgositsile," Margo Natalie Crawford, Cornell Univ.

2. "Points of Departure and Return: The Geographies of Keorapetse Kgostisile," Stephane P. Robolin

3. "Daar is kak in die land: Keorapetse Kgositsile and Protest from Postapartheid South Africa," Tsitsi Jaji, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Russian Modernism and German Philosophical Thought

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Karen Rosenflanz, Coll. of Saint Scholastica

1. "Bely and Novalis: The Failed Symbolist Quest for the Romantic Absolute," Evgeniya Koroleva, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

2. "The Origins and Significance of Daniil Kharms's Impossible Objects," Alexander Brookes, Yale Univ.

3. "Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky at the Interstice between Fiction and Reality," Karen Rosenflanz

Respondent: Edith W. Clowes, Univ. of Kansas

Frost and the Politics of Poetry

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the Robert Frost Society. Presiding: Timothy O'Brien, United States Naval Acad.

1. "Frost and Politics," Steven Gould Axelrod, Univ. of California, Riverside

2. "'Cuteness' and Robert Frost," Ethan R. Whittet, Northeastern Univ.

3. "Frost and Brazil during the Eisenhower Years," Camille Roman, Washington State Univ., Pullman

For abstracts, visit www.usna.edu/Users/english/obrien/homepage.html.

Why Race Matters: Rewriting the Lusotropical Nation

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Kathryn M. Sanchez, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "Intersections of Race and Modernity," Kathryn M. Sanchez

2. "'New Man' in the Tropics: The Influence of Nietzsche on Gilberto Freyre," Jeroen Dewulf, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Lusotropicalist Matters: The Knot of Discourse, Pleasure, and Production," Ana Paula Ferreira, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

4. "Blacks versus Whites: Self-Denomination, Soccer, and Race Representations in Brazil," Emanuelle K. F. Oliveira, Vanderbilt Univ.

Courtly Values in Medieval Courtly Literature

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the International Courtly Literature Society. Presiding: Daniel Farris Pigg, Univ. of Tennessee, Martin

1. "Communicating Courtly Values through Encrypted Bodies: Hartmann von Aue and Wolfram von Eschenbach," Rosmarie T. Morewedge, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

2. "Family Values in Arthur's Court: Malory's 'Tale of Sir Gareth,'" Noah Peterson, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

3. "Sprezzatura, Techne, and the Value of Effort in Castiglione and Spenser," Galena Hashhozheva, Ludwig Maximilian Univ.

4. "Courtly Writers Writing the Court," Jose A. Rico-Ferrer, Wayne State Univ.

Echoes of Simone de Beauvoir in Rochefort, García Márquez, and the Kitchen

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Simone de Beauvoir Society. Presiding: Lynn Kettler Penrod, Univ. of Alberta

1. "Simone de Beauvoir et la cuisine," Véronique Olivier, Chapman Univ.

2. "Gabriel García Márquez's Love in the Time of Cholera and Simone de Beauvoir's The Coming of Age," Tommie L. Jackson, Saint Cloud State Univ.

3. "Simone de Beauvoir, Christiane Rochefort, and Consumer Society Revisited," Lynn Kettler Penrod

What Do Graduate Students in Spanish Need to Learn, and Why?

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. Presiding: Joan L. Brown, Univ. of Delaware, Newark

Speakers: Joan L. Brown; Emily C. Francomano, Georgetown Univ.; Roberta Johnson, Univ. of Kansas; Sheri Spaine Long, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham; Gustavo Pérez Firmat, Columbia Univ.; Randolph D. Pope, Univ. of Virginia

This roundtable responds to a fundamental question posed by Russell A. Berman: "Today's graduate students will become tomorrow's teachers of undergraduates: Do we have the right curricula in place?" Panelists will work together with the audience to try to identify literary, linguistic, cultural, and professional items that are indispensable for graduate education in Spanish.

Visual and Graphic Representations by Hispanic/Luso/Latina Female Writers and Artists

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by Feministas Unidas. Presiding: Magdalena M. Maiz-Peña, Davidson Coll.

1. "Representación visual y corporal de la memoria y postmemoria en Bordado en la piel de la memoria de Mirta Kupferminc," Daniela Goldfine, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "La transfiguración femenina: Del animal cínico al terrorismo gótico de la abyección. El comic serial de Cecila Pego y Caro Chinaski," Carina González, Univ. of Florida

3. "Bodies at the Crossroads: Latinas' Latina Graphic Narratives," Margaret Galvan, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

4. "Mutation and Visibility: The Representation of a Female Body in Dominican Visual Art," Elena Valdez, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

For abstracts, visit feministas-unidas.org.

Reconfiguring the Literary: Narratives, Methods, Theories

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Susan Schreibman, Trinity Coll., Dublin

Speakers: Alison Booth, Univ. of Virginia; Mark Stephen Byron, Univ. of Sydney; Øyvind Eide, Univ. of Oslo; Alexander Gil, Univ. of Virginia; Rita Raley, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

This roundtable will include projects that show how notions of the literary (narrative, method, and theory) can be fundamentally reconfigured by digital (con)texts.

For abstracts, visit http://ach.org/ach-sessions-2012-mla-convention after 1 Dec.

The Poetry of Names: Onomastic Investigations into the Work of Gertrude Stein

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Name Society. Presiding: Iman Makeba Laversuch, Univ. of Cologne

1. "No Rectification or There about It: Gertrude Stein's Improper Names," Merrill Cole, Western Illinois Univ.

2. "Reconfiguring Identities: Naming and Repetition in Canonical Works by Gertrude Stein," Julie Elaine Goodspeed-Chadwick, Indiana Univ.–Purdue Univ., Columbus

3. "Queer Onomastics: Naming the Unnameable in Gertrude Stein," Allen Durgin, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

For abstracts, visit www.wtsn.binghamton.edu/ANS.

Man and Animal

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Latin American Literature from Independence to 1900. Presiding: Joshua K. Lund, Univ. of Pittsburgh

1. "Animal Logic and Human Sacrifice: Notes on Juana Manuela Gorriti's 'La hija del mazorquero' and Esteban Echeverria's 'El matadero,'" Magali Armillas-Tiseyra, New York Univ.

2. "The Consent of Beasts," Ysette Guevara, New York Univ.

3. "Looking (Back): Pets, Domestic Animals, Humans, Companion Species," Lee Joan Skinner, Claremont McKenna Coll.

Respondent: Betina González, Univ. of Buenos Aires

Word, Image, Media in Early America

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on American Literature to 1800. Presiding: Sean X. Goudie, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Why We Left: Transmedia and Transatlantic Archives of Colonial Memory," Joanna M. Brooks, San Diego State Univ.

2. "Phillis Wheatley and Art's New Geographies in Colonial America," Sarah Dennis, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Semaphores: The Chappe Telegraph in the Early Republic," Eric Wertheimer, Arizona State Univ. West

Respondent: Christopher J. Lukasik, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

Teaching Creative Writing

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Teaching as a Profession. Presiding: Jeffrey J. Williams, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

1. "Black Box Pedagogy: The Myth of Community in Creative Writing Programs," Eric Charles LeMay, Ohio Univ., Athens

2. "Against Workshop: The Virtues of Low-Residency Programs," John Fried, Duquesne Univ.

3. "The Revenge of Literature: Creative Writing beyond the Workshop," Emily Rosko, Coll. of Charleston

4. "Rethinking Craft," Mark James McGurl, Stanford Univ.

For abstracts, write to jwill@andrew.cmu.edu.

Strindberg and Modernism

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Scandinavian Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Anna W. Stenport, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Ambivalent Beginnings: Strindberg, the Artists' Book, and the Foundation of Swedish Material Modernism," Jon Viklund, Uppsala Univ.

2. "Dramatizing the Modern Consciousness: Strindberg's The Stronger and Beckett's Not I," Eszter Szalczer, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York

3. "The Images of Children and Childhood in Strindberg’s Oeuvre: From Enfants Terribles to Prodigal Sons," Polina Lisovskaya, St. Petersburg State Univ.

States of Feeling: Citizenship, Sovereignty, and Affect

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Kevin J. H. Dettmar, Pomona Coll.

1. "Virginia Woolf's Communities of Trust," Lisa Jeanne Fluet, Boston Coll.

2. "Beauty and the Beastly Prime Minister," John Su, Marquette Univ.

3. "'The War Was on Their Nerves': Love and Hate in Patrick Hamilton's The Slaves of Solitude and Elizabeth Bowen's The Heat of the Day," Eluned Summers-Bremner, Univ. of Auckland

Corpus Applications in Germanic Philology and Linguistics

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Germanic Philology. Presiding: Richard Whitt, Univ. of Manchester

1. "How to Present Gothic in the Computer Age?" Irmengard Rauch, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Toward a Syntax of the Eye: The Verbal Frame in Early New High German Dependent Clauses," Ilona Vandergriff, San Francisco State Univ.

3. "Extraposition in West Central German," Shannon Andrew Dubenion-Smith, Western Washington Univ.

4. "Unshifted Forms from the Second Consonant Shift: Borrowing or Incomplete Lexical Diffusion?" Craig Callender, Georgia Coll. and State Univ.

Exploring Scots

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Scottish Literature. Presiding: Donna Heddle, UHI Millennium Inst.

1. "John Galt in the Mediterranean," Angela Esterhammer, Univ. of Zurich

2. "A Naturalist Abroad: Robert Louis Stevenson Reading Darwin in the South Seas," Audrey D. Murfin, Sam Houston State Univ.

3. "A. L. Kennedy in the Borderlands," Alyson Margaret Bardsley, Coll. of Staten Island, City Univ. of New York

4. "Black Watch and British Empire: Theaters of War," Lynn Ramert, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

For abstracts, visit www.uwyo.edu/english/Faculty-Staff/McCracken-Flesher.html.

Good Practices in Hiring, Developing, and Reviewing Contingent Faculty Members

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession. Presiding: Douglas Hesse, Univ. of Denver

1. "The Importance of Established Curricula and Syllabi for Making Good Hiring Decisions," Elizabeth Bernhardt, Stanford Univ.

2. "Laboring More to Labor Otherwise: Professional Development as Leverage for Change," Debra Frank Dew, Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs; Justin Jory, Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs

3. "Supporting and Developing Online Adjunct Faculty Members at a Comprehensive University," Christopher Ervin, Western Kentucky Univ.

4. "Prior to Enactment of University Rule 6-310 (IDTP): Claiming Space for Contingent Faculty Members," Maureen Mathison, Univ. of Utah

Respondent: Katia McClain, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Italian Counterculture: Macaronism, Libertinage, Anti-Petrarchism, Etc.

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. Presiding: Bernardo Piciché, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

1. "Madness and Tyranny: Ariosto, Machiavelli, and the Limits of Power," Andrea Moudarres, Coll. of the Holy Cross

2. "Disobedient Daughters and Desiring Nuns: Subverting Marriage in Gl'ingannati," Jeanette Goddard, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "A Midcentury Response to Bembo: Carlo Lenzoni's Difesa della lingua fiorentina, e di Dante," Michael Sherberg, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Rhetorical Historiography and the Digital Humanities

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: Janice Fernheimer, Univ. of Kentucky

1. "Touch Memory Death Technology Argument: Reading Onscreen," Anne Frances Wysocki, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

2. "Digital Archives as Rhetoric: Emerging Opportunities for Research and Design," William Hart-Davidson, Michigan State Univ.; Jim Ridolfo, Univ. of Cincinnati

3. "Feminist Historiography and the Digital Humanities," Jessica Enoch, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Public Intellectuals and the Question of Media

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Nonfiction Prose Studies, Excluding Biography and Autobiography. Presiding: Brian J. Norman, Loyola Univ., Baltimore

1. "Debating Form: Enlightenment Serial Publishing as Prehistory?" Richard Squibbs, DePaul Univ.

2. "Truth and Conviction: Going Public with the Archive of Mary Suratt," Augusta Rohrbach, Washington State Univ., Pullman

3. "New Left versus New Media? Latin American Encounters with Social(ist) Media," Russell St Clair Cobb, Univ. of Alberta

4. "Professors in Public," Susan H. Lurie, Rice Univ.

Respondent: Hortense Jeanette Spillers, Vanderbilt Univ.

Is There a Restoration without the Eighteenth Century?

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Toni Bowers, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Is There Such a Thing as Restoration Literature?" Steven Zwicker, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

2. "The Dialectic of Restoration Enlightenment," Alison Conway, Univ. of Western Ontario

3. "The Restoration of Drama," Lisa A. Freeman, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

4. "The Political Economy of Restoration Literature: Goldsmiths, Coin Clipping, and the Exclusion Crisis in Dryden's Poetry," Sean D. Moore, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

Rethinking Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Studies

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. Presiding: Michael Iarocci, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Speakers: Alda Blanco, San Diego State Univ.; Rebecca Haidt, Ohio State Univ., Columbus; Jo Labanyi, New York Univ.; Jesús Pérez-Magallón, McGill Univ.; Wadda C. Ríos-Font, Barnard Coll.

Respondent: Michael Iarocci

Recent years have witnessed substantial reconfigurations of the way scholars approach eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature and culture. Discussion will focus on shifts in the field, with particular attention to emergent lines of inquiry that are reshaping the discipline.

Composing New Partnerships in the Digital Humanities

Saturday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Catherine Jean Prendergast, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Speakers: Matthew K. Gold, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York; Catherine Jean Prendergast; Alexander Reid, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York; Spencer Schaffner, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Annette Vee, Univ. of Pittsburgh

The objective of this roundtable is to facilitate interactions between digital humanists and writing studies scholars who, despite shared interests in digital authorship, intellectual property, peer review, classroom communication, and textual revision, have often failed to collaborate. An extended period for audience involvement has been designed to seed partnerships beyond the conference.

Global Exiles: Images of Otherness on Austria's World Maps

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Carola Daffner, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale

1. "Global Austria in the Nineteenth Century: Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, and the 1846 Galician Uprising," John D. Pizer, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

2. "The Bridge on the Drina: A Fatal Encounter of the Global Monarchy with the Dangerous Locality in Bosnia," Ana Foteva, Univ. of Minnesota, Morris

3. "Exit 'the Subject,' Enter 'the Person': Assessing 'Recht muss Recht bleiben!' in the Case of Arigona Zogaj," Jutta M. Gsoels-Lorensen, Penn State Univ., Altoona

Becoming Animal: Representations of Posthuman Kinship in Recent Hybrid Poetry

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Tana Jean Welch, Florida State Univ.

1. "'This Other Disastrous Thing': Bhanu Kapil's Posthumanist Humanimal," Margaret Ronda, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "'So We Dream the Same': The Posthuman Pataphysical Poet(h)ics of Angela Rawlings's Wide Slumber for Lepidopterists," Melissa A. Dalgleish, York Univ.

3. "Entangled Species: The Inclusive Poetics of Juliana Spahr," Tana Jean Welch

For abstracts and papers, write to tanajeanwelch@gmail.com.

Technology and Chinese Literature and Language

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Xiaoping Song, Norwich Univ.

1. "Adaptation: Rewriting Modern Chinese Literary Masterpieces," Paul Manfredi, Pacific Lutheran Univ.

2. "Technology in Chinese Instruction: A Web-Based Extensive Reading Program," Helen Heling Shen, Univ. of Iowa

3. "Technology and Teaching Chinese Literature in Translation," Keith Dede, Lewis and Clark Coll.

4. "Text-Image-Imagined Words: An Approach to Teaching Chinese Literature," Xiaoping Song

For abstracts, write to xsong@norwich.edu.

New Directions in Earlier Tudor Drama

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Maura Giles Watson, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln; Erin E. Kelly, Univ. of Victoria

1. "'They Make the Chronicles Themselves': Paranoid History in John Bale's King Johan," Philip Schwyzer, Univ. of Exeter

2. "Theater as Politics, Theater as Art: William Briton, an Early Reader of Gorboduc," Laura Estill, Univ. of Victoria

3. "Ecocritical Heywood and The Play of the Wether," Jennifer L. Ailles, Chicago, IL

4. "'To See the Playes of Theatre Newe Wrought': Electronic Editions of Early Tudor Drama," Brett Hirsch, Univ. of Western Australia

Contemporary American Fiction and the Fate of Individuality

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 612, WSCC

A special session

1. "Philip Roth's Modest Phase," Mark James McGurl, Stanford Univ.

2. "What about the Children? The Twenty-First-Century American Novel and the Abuse of the Young," Gordon N. Hutner, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Franzen, Fiction, and the Aggregate," Margaret Hunt Gram, Harvard Univ.

Respondent: Andrew Hoberek, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

Language and Learning

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Metropolitan A, Sheraton

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum The Presidential Forum: Language, Literature, Learning (202). Presiding: Barbara K. Altmann, Univ. of Oregon

Speakers: Mark Bauerlein, Emory Univ.; Anne Ruggles Gere, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Catherine Ingold, National Foreign Language Center; Claire J. Kramsch, Univ. of California, Berkeley

A roundtable discussion of literacy acquisition and education policy, including the “common core standards” and “the race to the top.” How do current policies and the content of standardized examinations affect student literacy in high schools, and what are the consequences for the college classroom? What policies might contribute to improved first-language literacy skills, and how can we promote second-language learning so as to achieve universal bilingualism?

Postcolonial Literary History: Concepts and Permutations

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 6A, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Postcolonial Studies in Literature and Culture and the Division on English Literature Other Than British and American. Presiding: Ato Quayson, Univ. of Toronto

Speakers: Ankhi Mukherjee, Univ. of Oxford, Wadham Coll.; Mariano Siskind, Harvard Univ.; Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Columbia Univ.

While literary theory has been central to the formation of postcolonial studies, many scholars in the field, along with those in cognate areas such as comparative and world literature, have increasingly turned their attention to mapping literary history. This roundtable will focus on various issues in literary history from postcolonial, comparative, and other perspectives and will be aimed at graduate students and everyone interested in literary history generally.

Beyond Agrarianism: Southern Ecologies and Economies

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Southern Literature. Presiding: Leigh Anne Duck, Univ. of Mississippi

1. "Florida Oranges: Agriculture and Environmentalism in Stowe's Palmetto Leaves," Kathryn Dolan, Univ. of South Florida

2. "Living on the Periphery: Faulkner, Space, and Ecological Economics," Caroline Miles, Univ. of Texas–Pan American

3. "From Aggrieved White Masculinity to Climate Change Denial: Understanding Conservative Jouissance in Two Cases from Alabama," Jon Smith, Simon Fraser Univ.

E-Arming the Future? Technology's Expanding Influence on the Form and Readership of Young-Adult Literature

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Children's Literature Association. Presiding: Thomas Crisp, Univ. of South Florida

1. "Twilight Online Fandom: Reaching Femininity through Textual Manipulation and Abstraction," Norma Aceves, California State Univ., Northridge

2. "I've Got My iPhone on You: Technology and Surveillance Culture in Gossip Girl," Sara Day, Southern Arkansas Univ.

3. "Utilizing Technology," Tammy Mielke, Univ. of Wyoming

Issues Facing Graduate Students of Color in the Profession

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the Graduate Student Caucus. Presiding: Reginald A. Wilburn, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

Speakers: Koritha Mitchell, Ohio State Univ., Columbus; Nahir Otaño Gracia, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst; Roopika Risam, Emory Univ.; Tyechia Thompson, Howard Univ.; Min Yang, Univ. of Alberta

As they prepare to enter the profession, graduate students of color face a number of barriers, some structural and institutional, others covert and implicit. This roundtable is designed to call attention to areas where higher education is falling short of its commitment to accessibility, equity, and diversity, as well as to suggest ways to overcome these barriers.

Economies of Waste in Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century US Literary Culture

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature and the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. Presiding: Stephanie Foote, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Loomings and Soundings: Ocean Differentials and Depths of Cetacean Waste in Moby-Dick and The Whale," Michelle Renee Sizemore, Univ. of Kentucky

2. "P-Waste: The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography," Stephanie LeMenager, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "Waste and the Economy of Philanthropy in Huckleberry Finn," Melissa Strong, Northeastern State Univ.

Money, Money, Money: Debt and Speculation in the Literature of the Goethezeit

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Goethe Society of North America and the G. E. Lessing Society. Presiding: Elisabeth Krimmer, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "'Dem Mann kann geholfen werden': The Discharge of Debts in Schiller's Early Plays," Gail K. Hart, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "Love's Surplus," Heidi Schlipphacke, Old Dominion Univ.

3. "'Uralte und nie gehobne Beschwerde': Goethe, Faust, and Taxes," William H. Carter, Iowa State Univ.

Asian/American Diaspora

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by MELUS: The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. Presiding: Wenxin Li, Suffolk County Community Coll., Ammerman Campus, NY

1. "Eileen Chang's American-Chinese Novel: Half a Lifelong Romance," Karen S. Kingsbury, Chatham Univ.

2. "Karen Tei Yamashita's Global Asian Mestizo/a Diasporic Consciousness and Magic Realism in Through the Arc of the Rain Forest," Lingyan Yang, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Are We Coming or Going? Preeta Samrasan's Evening Is the Whole Day," Sze Wei Ang, Hong Kong Univ.

4. "Seeking Refuge Everywhere: Can Palestinians Be Situated?" Basuli Deb, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

The Futures of Latin American Literary and Cultural Criticism

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature. Presiding: Ignacio Sanchez-Prado, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Speakers: Susan Jennifer Antebi, Univ. of Toronto; Jon Beasley-Murray, Univ. of British Columbia; Román de la Campa, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Brian Lee Gollnick, Univ. of Iowa; Jaime Hanneken, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Mabel E. Moraña, Washington Univ. in St. Louis; Dierdra Reber, Emory Univ.

This roundtable will engage new openings and possible futures of Latin American literary and cultural studies. It will assess seemingly exhausted paradigms in Latin American studies (like cultural studies, transculturation, the literary), while proposing new trends and ideas (like affect, disability studies, posthegemony, negative dialectics, and a new theory of class) to think new lines of inquiry in the field.

For abstracts, write to isanchez@wustl.edu.

Native-Asian Encounters

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Asian American Literature and the Division on American Indian Literatures. Presiding: James H. Cox, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "The Measure of Civilization in Native and Asian Representations: Afong Moy and Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins," Cari M. Carpenter, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown; K. Hyoejin Yoon, West Chester Univ.

2. "Half-Castes and Half-Breeds in Love: Moving beyond the Discourse of Blood," Jolie Sheffer, Bowling Green State Univ.

3. "Picking Up Ghosts: The Specter of Native American History in Shawn Wong's Homebase," Catherine Fung, Bentley Univ.

4. "Back to Ground Zero: Performing the Fiction of Race in Gerald Vizenor’s Hiroshima Bugi: Atomu 57," Linda Lizut Helstern, North Dakota State Univ.

The United Front: Colonial and Ethnic

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Katerina Clark, Yale Univ.

1. "Pacific Front: Lu Xun, Agnes Smedley, Mike Gold," Richard Jean So, Univ. of Chicago

2. "Premature Postcolonialism: Mulk Raj Anand and the Literary Popular Front in the Colonies," Rossen Djagalov, Yale Univ.

3. "Multiethnic Front: Louis Adamic's International Nationalism," Ichiro Takayoshi, Tufts Univ.

Respondent: Benjamin Conisbee Baer, Princeton Univ.

For abstracts, write to ichiro.takayoshi@tufts.edu.

New Media, New Pedagogies

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Prose Fiction. Presiding: Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Steampunk Wells: Game Design as Narrative Pedagogy," Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt Univ.

2. "Technologies That Describe: Data Visualization and Contemporary Fiction," Heather Houser, Univ. of Texas, Austin

3. "Better Looking, Close Reading: How Online Fiction Builds Literary-Critical Skills," John David Zuern, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

Linguistics at the MLA

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Theory. Presiding: Roslyn Sue Raney, Coll. of San Mateo, CA

1. "Generic Uptake and the Actuation of Historical Stylistics," Jeffrey Wajsberg, Univ. of British Columbia

2. "Linguistic Lacunae at the MLA," Mary Blockley, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Preservation Is (Not) Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Libraries and Research in Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Robert H. Kieft, Occidental Coll.

Speakers: John Kiplinger, JSTOR; Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station; Jeff Wilensky, ProQuest; John Wilkin, HathiTrust Digital Library

Respondent: Joan Lippincott, Coalition for Networked Information

The speakers will discuss the preservation of texts as a core purpose of libraries, engaging questions regarding the tasks of deciding what materials to preserve and when and which to let go: best practices; institutional and collective roles for the preservation of materials in various formats; economics and governance structures of preserving materials; issues of tools, standards, and platforms for digital materials.

For abstracts, visit www.wiu.edu/users/wat100/2012/ after 1 Dec.

Film and the Virtual

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Film. Presiding: Homay King, Bryn Mawr Coll.; Nicholas Sammond, Univ. of Toronto

1. "The Chora Line: RealD Incorporated," Caetlin Benson-Allott, Georgetown Univ.

2. "Locating Gazes: Cinematic Play in BioShock," Nico Dicecco, Simon Fraser Univ.

3. "Strange Virtual Engines: Memory and Technics in Tarkovsky's Solaris," Michael Podolny, Univ. of California, Riverside

4. "The Bearable Lightness of Being: (Un)Real, Performativity, and Exhibitive Images in Jia Zhang-ke's The World," Lei Qin, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Encounters with Race in the Age of American Transcendentalism

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the Thoreau Society. Presiding: Rochelle Johnson, Coll. of Idaho

1. "Transcendental Historicism and Race in Lydia Maria Child's The First Settlers of New England," Lance Newman, Westminster Coll., UT

2. "Affective Dimensions of Race in Emerson's 1844 Emancipation Address," Ryan Schneider, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

3. "Frederick Law Olmsted and the Environment of Race," William A. Gleason, Princeton Univ.

Respondent: Paul Outka, Univ. of Kansas

For abstracts, visit www.thoreausociety.org.

Dickensian Things

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Dickens Society. Presiding: Claire Elizabeth Jarvis, Stanford Univ.

1. "Dickensian Characters: Giving New Meaning to Type(s)," Carolyn Lesjak, Simon Fraser Univ.

2. "Words That Wound: Documentary Violence in Bleak House," Suzanne Daly, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

3. "The Architecture of Things in Bleak House," Elaine Auyoung, Harvard Univ.

Construcciones galdosianas del individuo en/y la sociedad

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the International Association of Galdós Scholars. Presiding: Diane F. Urey, Illinois State Univ.

1. "Darwinian Errors of Collective Understanding in Galdós's Fortunata y Jacinta," Travis Landry, Kenyon Coll.

2. "The Degeneration of Self and Society: Patriarchal Crises in Benito Pérez Galdós's Las novelas de Torquemada," Bryan Cameron, Bryn Mawr Coll.

3. "Building Character: Social Reform and Formal Innovation in Fortunata y Jacinta," Liana J. Ewald, San Diego State Univ.

Institutional Woolf

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Virginia Woolf Society. Presiding: Amanda Golden, Emory Univ.

1. "Improving on 'A Dog's Chance': A Room of One's Own as a Reply to Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch's On the Art of Writing," Emily Kopley, Stanford Univ.

2. "Woolf in the Modern Library Series: Bridging the Gap between Academics and Common Readers," Lise Jaillant, Univ. of British Columbia

3. "Translation in and out of the University," Emily Dalgarno, Boston Univ.

4. "Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury at Smith College," Karen V. Kukil, Smith Coll.

Digital Faulkner: William Faulkner and Digital Humanities

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society. Presiding: Steven Knepper, Univ. of Virginia

Speakers: Keith Goldsmith, Vintage Books; John B. Padgett, Brevard Coll.; Stephen Railton, Univ. of Virginia; Peter Stoicheff, Univ. of Saskatchewan

A roundtable on digital humanities and its implications for teaching and scholarship on the work of William Faulkner.

For abstracts, visit faulknersociety.com/panels.htm after 15 Dec.

Winter Meeting of the Dante Society of America

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Presiding: Nancy J. Vickers, Bryn Mawr Coll.

"Naked Pacts and Poems Dressed: Genre, Gender, and Contract Law in Dante," Justin Steinberg, Univ. of Chicago

Performing Postmodernity with a Balkan Flair

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Romanian Studies Association of America. Presiding: Domnica Radulescu, Washington and Lee Univ.

1. "Ionesquian Intertextualities in Matéi Visniec’s De la sensation d’élasticité lorsqu’on marche sur des cadavres," Ana-Maria M'Enesti, Univ. of Oregon

2. "Dangerous Liaisons: Communism, Utopia, and Mental Projections," Rodica C. Ieta, State Univ. of New York, Oswego

3. "Romanian Theater as Mezzo Text: Revisiting Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard," Ileana Alexandra Orlich, Arizona State Univ.

4. "Women, War, and Waxing West," Domnica Radulescu

For abstracts, write to radulescuvm@gmail.com after 1 Jan.

Why Teach Literature

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grand A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Literature. Presiding: Jennifer Holberg, Calvin Coll.

1. "Why Literature Teachers Should Stop Being Cheap Dates," Paul Lauter, Trinity Coll., CT

2. "Literature in the Age of Global Markets and Social Networks," Ramón Saldívar, Stanford Univ.

3. "On Not Teaching Literature: A Chronicle," Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke Univ.

What Happened to the Social?

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Sociological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Imre Szeman, Univ. of Alberta

1. "Antisocial Psychology," Sarah Brouillette, Carleton Univ.

2. "Social by Any Other Name: New Networks," Peter James Hitchcock, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York

3. "Marcuse's Hegel and the Function of Critical Sociology," Paul Smith, George Mason Univ.

Intercultural Memory and Hungarian Literature

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Hungarian Literature. Presiding: Andras Kisery, City Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Wordsworth in Hungarian Cultural Memory," Zsolt Komáromy, Hungarian Soc. for the Study of English

2. "Before the Pictorial Turn: Image, History, and Memory in the Works of Péter Lengyel and Alexander Kluge," Zsofia Ban, Eotvos Lorand Univ.

3. "Intermedial Recollections: Péter Nádas, Photography, and Illness," Lauren Walsh, New School

4. "Monuments and Bulldozers: Social Memory in Celestial Harmonies and The Dead Father," Katalin Orban, Eotvos Lorand Univ.

Inscription and Performance

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Drama. Presiding: Claire Sponsler, Univ. of Iowa

1. "Mexican Identities and YouTube Shakespeare," Ruben Espinosa, Univ. of Texas, El Paso

2. "Mortal Inscriptions: Performative Writings on the Body," Cara Elisabeth Ogburn, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

3. "On Book: Scriptive Texts in Performance," Christopher Grobe, Amherst Coll.

Who's Writing in French? Language and Identity Formations

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Alison S. James, Univ. of Chicago

1. "Writing with the Past: Présentisme and the Mark of Contemporary French Fiction," Oana Panaite, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "Self-Exposure and the Energetic Reinterpretation of Authorship in Today's French Novel," Emmanuel Bouju, Univ. of Rennes 2

3. "Universalizing Transgender Representation in Contemporary France," Todd W. Reeser, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Body and Spirit

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Stephen B. Dobranski, Georgia State Univ.

1. "'The Smell of Blood': Spiritual Inspiration in Shakespeare's Macbeth," Jennifer Rae McDermott, Univ. of Toronto

2. "Knowing Looks: Cognition of the Body and Soul in the Lyrics of Donne and Milton," Julia M. Walker, State Univ. of New York, Geneseo

3. "Protestant and Catholic Mortalism in Milton and Crashaw," Dennis Taylor, Boston Coll.

For abstracts, write to sbdobranski@gsu.edu.

Work

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the PMLA Editorial Board. Presiding: Debra Ann Castillo, Cornell Univ.

1. "On the Rentier," Bruce W. Robbins, Columbia Univ.

2. "Crossing the Line: Collaborative Work in the Humanities," Debra Ann Castillo

3. "A 'Paradise of Parasites': Hannah Arendt, Empire, and the Labor of Superfluousness," Dorian F. Bell, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

4. "Industry in Idealized Form: Keeping Production out of Sight in German Cinema," John E. Davidson, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

The Academic Workplace 101

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Programs. Presiding: Jenifer K. Ward, Cornish Coll. of the Arts

1. "I Just Work Here: What's Shared Governance?" Jenifer K. Ward

2. "The Expectations of the Chair," Jane Hacking, Univ. of Utah

3. "What's Academic Freedom?" Doug Steward, MLA

4. "What Rules and Regulations?" Nelly Furman, MLA

Žižek's East: Geopolitical Fractures in Žižek's Universalism

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures. Presiding: Dragan Kujundzic, Univ. of Florida

1. "The Menon-Žižek Debate; or, How to Read Žižek in a Postcolonial Context," Gautam Basu Thakur, Univ. of Mississippi

2. "Žižek on Film: The Unbearable Lightness of Interpreting," Mario Slugan, Univ. of Chicago

3. "The Balkans: Radical Conservatism and Desire," Dusan Bjelic, Univ. of Southern Maine, Portland

Respondent: Tomislav Z. Longinovic, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

For abstracts, visit http://mlaslavicdivision2012.blogspot.com.

Queer Memoir

Saturday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Women's Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Jennifer DeVere Brody, Stanford Univ.

1. "What I Gained in This Orgy: Natalie Barney's Unpublished Memoirs and the Modernist Brothel Text," Cecily Swanson, Cornell Univ.

2. "Permeable We: Intersubjectivity and Relational Affect in Contemporary Queer Memoir," Tyler Bradway, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "Marketing a Queer Self: Eliza Lynn Linton and Christopher Kirkland," Lee Anne Bache, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

Respondent: Christine Varnado, Columbia Univ.

Luncheon Arranged by the Conference on Christianity and Literature

Saturday, 12:00 noon, Washington Athletic Club

For reservations, send $40 to Lisa Siefker Bailey by 31 Dec.

Luncheon Arranged by the International Spenser Society

Saturday, 12:00 noon

For reservations and further information, contact Rhonda Lemke Sanford at rhonda.sanford@fairmontstate.edu by 27 Dec.

Jean Toomer and Politics

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 6A, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Gino Pellegrini, Pierce Coll.

Speakers: Barbara Clare Foley, Rutgers Univ., Newark; Gino Pellegrini; Charles Scruggs, Univ. of Arizona; Belinda Wheeler, Paine Coll.

This roundtable will focus on the 2011 edition of Jean Toomer's Cane, edited by Rudolph Byrd and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and in particular on the editors' provocative new thesis that Toomer was a Negro who chose to pass for white. Presenters will confront, examine, and discuss Byrd and Gates's thesis.

The Material Keats

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: G. Kim Blank, Univ. of Victoria

1. "Keats's Material Development," G. Kim Blank

2. "The Neglect of the Odes and of Mid-Twentieth-Century Criticism in Material-Historicist Readings of Keats," Beth Lau, California State Univ., Long Beach

3. "Rethinking Romantic Materiality in Keats," Richard C. Sha, American Univ.

4. "'The Shadow of a Magnitude': Linguistic Ruin in Keats," John A. Golden, Florida Atlantic Univ.

The Future of Teaching

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grand C, Sheraton

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum The Future of Higher Education (69). Presiding: Priscilla B. Wald, Duke Univ.

1. "Gaming the Humanities Classroom," Patrick Jagoda, Univ. of Chicago

2. "Intimacy in Three Acts," Margaret Rhee, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "One Course, One Project," Jentery Sayers, Univ. of Victoria

4. "The Meta Teacher," Bulbul Tiwari, Stanford Univ.

This session features innovative advanced doctoral students and junior scholars who are making their mark as scholars and as teachers using new interactive, multimedia technologies of writing and publishing in their research and classrooms. The panelists cross the boundaries of the humanities, arts, sciences, and technology and are committed to new forms of scholarship and pedogogy. They practice the virtues of open, public, digitally accessible thinking and represent the vibrancy of our profession. Fiona Barnett, Duke Univ., will coordinate live Twitter feeds and other input during the session.

Networks, Maps, and Words: Digital-Humanities Approaches to the Archive of American Slavery

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lauren Klein, Georgia Inst. of Tech.

1. "'A Report Has Come Here': Social-Network Analysis in the Papers of Thomas Jefferson," Lauren Klein

2. "Slave Narratives in Space: Mapping the World of Venture Smith," Cameron Blevins, Stanford Univ.

3. "Using Digital Tools to Explore Narrative Conventions in the North American Antebellum Slave Narratives," Aditi Muralidharan, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Respondent: Amy Earhart, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

Interwar Encounters with Metropolitan French Literature: Diffusions, Responses, Censorship

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sara Kippur, Trinity Coll., CT

1. "René Maran, Forgotten Father of the Francophone Novel," Felisa Vergara Reynolds, Univ. of Saint Thomas

2. "The Effects of Censorship on the Emergence of Anticolonial Protest in France," Phyllis Suzanne Taoua, Univ. of Arizona

3. "'Les fictions les plus parisiennes': Condemnation and Imitation in the French-Canadian Didactic Novel of the 1920s," François Proulx, Harvard Univ.

Respondent: Odile Marie Cazenave, Boston Univ.

Regional Rhetorics

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Rhetoric Society of America. Presiding: Jenny Rice, Univ. of Kentucky

1. "Capote in Kansas: The Making of a Region," David Tell, Univ. of Kansas

2. "Raices Americanas: Indigenist Art, América, and Arguments for Ecuadorian Nationalism," Christa Olson, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

3. "Delinking and Decoloniality: A Regional Rhetoric against Global Capitalism," Ronald Walter Greene, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

4. "Adjacent Identity and the Regional Appeal," Jenny Rice

For abstracts, visit jordynnjack.com/rsa-at-mla/.

Asian/Jewish/American

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jaime Cleland, Ohio Univ., Athens

1. "'New Jews,' Old Story: Asians, Jews, and Whiteness in America," Vincent J. Cheng, Univ. of Utah

2. "Mike Gold's Moneyless Jews and Younghill Kang's Oriental Yankees: A Comparative Ethnic Studies Critique," Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

3. "Graphic Transformations: Ethno-racial Identity and Discovery in Two Comics of Childhood," Tahneer Oksman, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

4. "Jews, Asians, and WASPs in The Social Network," Jonathan E. Freedman, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Eros, Empathy, and Sacrifice in T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 617, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Gabrielle McIntire, Queen's Univ.

1. "Empathy and Elegy in Eliot and Woolf," Eve C. Sorum, Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston

2. "How Pleasant to Kiss Mr. Eliot: Aesthetics, Erotics, and the Eliot-Woolf Connection," Molly Hite, Cornell Univ.

3. "'Other Echoes': Sacrificial Narratives and the Problems of Reading Virginia Woolf and T. S. Eliot," John Whittier-Ferguson, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Performing Identity in Late Life

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Age Studies. Presiding: Leni Marshall, Univ. of Wisconsin, Menomonie

1. "PerformAge: Figuring Age Performativities," Tine Fristrup, Aarhus Univ.

2. "Melancholic Morphing: Aging Male Protagonists in Recent American Graphic Novels," Adrielle Anna Mitchell, Nazareth Coll. of Rochester

3. "Dis-eased and Dis-membered: A Consideration of Alzheimer's," Susan Hays Bussey, Georgia Gwinnett Coll.

Respondent: Valerie B. Lipscomb, Univ. of South Florida

Literature of Political Radicalism in the Pacific Northwest

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Radical Caucus in English and the Modern Languages. Presiding: Jon-Christian Suggs, John Jay Coll. of Criminal Justice, City Univ. of New York

1. "The Invisible Frontier: Ruling-Class Ideology and Class Struggle in the Essays and Stories of Raymond Carver," Christopher Craig, Emmanuel Coll.

2. "Aberdeen–Mexico City–New York–Berkeley: Quadrangulating Cultural and Political Radicalism in the Life of Clara Weatherwax," Jon-Christian Suggs

3. "From the South Pacific to the Pacific Northwest: Reconstituting 1930s Literary Class Consciousness through the Transnational Imaginations of Carlos Bulosan and William Attaway," Timothy R. Libretti, Northeastern Illinois Univ.

For abstracts, write to paul.lauter@trincoll.edu after 1 Jan.

Literature and Social Activism in South Asia

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the South Asian Literary Association and the Discussion Group on South Asian Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Kanika Batra, Texas Tech Univ.

1. "Performance and Social Activism in a Globalized Economy," Nimanthi Rajasingham, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "Midnight's Children and the Disabled Subaltern," Christopher Becker Krentz, Univ. of Virginia

3. "'The Poor Remain': Rethinking Literary Humanitarianism in Indra Sinha's Animal's People," Jennifer Rickel, Rice Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.southasianliteraryassociation.org/.

New Directions in Ecocriticism: Scientific Knowledge and Literary Critique

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 608, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Allison Carruth, Stanford Univ.; Robert Marzec, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

Speakers: Stacy Alaimo, Univ. of Texas, Arlington; Allison Carruth; Elizabeth M. DeLoughrey, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Mike Hill, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Heather Houser, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Robert Marzec

The scientific paradigm of data-driven research seems to give short shrift for critique--for the analysis of social ideologies, cultural forms, and representations that defines the intellectual terrain of literary criticism. In response, our roundtable explores how literary criticism and cultural critique can contribute to the fields of environmental science, policy, and thought.

Postnational Readings of the Audiovisual

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century German Literature and the Division on Film. Presiding: Nora M. Alter, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Deniz Göktürk, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Sounds of the Berlin School," Kalani Michell, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "International 'Auditorism': The Postnational Politics of Reading of von Donnersmarck’s The Lives of Others," Ian Thomas Fleishman, Harvard Univ.

3. "Surveying the Border Crossing: Terrorist Films and the Postnational Imaginary," Jaimey Fisher, Univ. of California, Davis

Material Translations in Early Modern Theater

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Literature of the English Renaissance, Excluding Shakespeare, and the Division on Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. Presiding: Natasha Korda, Wesleyan Univ.

1. "Angelo Beolco and the Early Modern English Stage," Nicoletta Pazzaglia, Univ. of Oregon

2. "Adventures of a Chopine," Pamela Allen Brown, Univ. of Connecticut, Stamford

3. "Spanish Gypsies Englished: Cervantes, Middleton, and The Spanish Gypsy," Emily Weissbourd, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Digital Humanities in the Italian Context

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Manuela Marchesini, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

1. "Digital Humanities in the Italian Culture Landscape," Stefano Franchi, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

2. "Life and the Digital: On Esposito and Tarizzo's Inventions of Life," Alberto Moreiras, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

3. "Humanist Studies and the Digital Age," Massimo Lollini, Univ. of Oregon

4. "Giacomo Leopardi's Zibaldone: From Card Index to Hypertext," Silvia Stoyanova, Princeton Univ.

For abstracts, write to mmarchesini@tamu.edu after 19 Dec.

Friendships, Networks, and Tribes

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Cuban and Cuban Diaspora Cultural Production. Presiding: Guillermina De Ferrari, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "The Sociability of Difference: Tertulias and Community in Contemporary Cuba," Vicky Unruh, Univ. of Kansas

2. "The Insider Tales of Reinaldo Arenas," José Antonio Quiroga, Emory Univ.

3. "Theatrical Networks in the Miami-Havana Border Zone," Lillian Manzor, Univ. of Miami

4. "The Politics of Friendship in Post-Soviet Cuban Fiction," Guillermina De Ferrari

On Comparison

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Comparative Literature Association. Presiding: Rita Felski, Univ. of Virginia; Susan Stanford Friedman, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "Axes of Comparison," C. P. Haun Saussy, Univ. of Chicago

2. "Comparison as Relation," Shu-mei Shih, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Crossroads, Parallelism, and Distant Killing: On the Ethics and Politics of Comparison," Longxi Zhang, City Univ. of Hong Kong

4. "On the Knowing or Understanding Subject: Who Is Comparing What and What For?" Walter D. Mignolo, Duke Univ.

Of Kings' Treasuries and the E-Protean Invasion: The Evolving Nature of Scholarly Research

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research. Presiding: Jude V. Nixon, Salem State Univ.

Speakers: Douglas M. Armato, Univ. of Minnesota Press; Harriett Green, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Dean J. Smith, Project MUSE; Pierre A. Walker, Salem State Univ.

This roundtable addresses the veritable explosion of emerging technologies (Google Books, Wikipedia, and e-readers) currently available to faculty members to enhance their scholarly research and how these resources are altering fundamentally the method of scholarly research. The session also wishes to examine access to these technologies and how they interact with the traditional research library and the still meaningful role, if any, it plays in scholarly research.

Claudel et la ville / les villes

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Paul Claudel Society. Presiding: Sergio Villani, York Univ., Keele

1. "Claudel et les villes," Marie Bourjea, Université de Montpellier III

2. "La ville de Claudel et de Guillevic," Sergio Villani

3. "Transforming Architecture: From Ville to Cité," Madhuri Mukherjee, William Paterson Univ.

4. "Poétiques de Claudel et Valéry: Approches théoriques: Art, critique, littérature," Eric Touya de Marenne, Clemson Univ.

Dissenting Voices

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Arabic Literature and Culture. Presiding: Anouar Majid, Univ. of New England

1. "Why Moroccan Women Rebel," Ibtissam Bouachrine, Smith Coll.

2. "Hip-Hop Insurgency," Nouri Gana, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Building Bridges with Songs: Amazigh Kateb and Abd al-Malik," Olivier Bourderionnet, Univ. of New Orleans

Law and Corporeality in Literature and Other Arts

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Law as Literature. Presiding: April Miller, Univ. of Northern Colorado

1. "Branding Bodies: Race, Trademark, in Apex Hides the Hurt," Richard Schur, Drury Univ.

2. "Thinking Property and Fugitive Tactics: The Malicious Intelligence of Moby-Dick," Jeffrey Hole, Univ. of the Pacific

3. "Disciplining the Minority Radical: Susan Choi's American Woman and the Patty Hearst Story," Betsy Huang, Clark Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.unco.edu/film_studies/mla2012.

Visual Culture

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages. Presiding: Inmaculada Pertusa, Western Kentucky Univ.

1. "From Writing to Painting: Caterina Albert and Mercè Rodoreda," Kathleen McNerney, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

2. "Alissa Torres’s Graphic Tale of Grief: American Widow; or, My Husband Bleeds History," Janis Breckenridge, Whitman Coll.

3. "The Anxiety of Density in Graphic Novels: Solutions Based on Genderic Conventions and Creative Collaborations," Maria Elsy Cardona, Saint Louis Univ.

4. "Helen Zouk’s ‘Desapariciones': Shooting Death," David William Foster, Arizona State Univ.

For abstracts, visit www3.davidson.edu/cms/x6108.xml.

Context versus Convenience: Teaching Contemporary Business Communication through Digital Media

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication. Presiding: Mahli Xuan Mechenbier, Kent State Univ.

1. "Reenvisioning and Renovating the Twenty-First-Century Business Communication Classroom," Lara Smith-Sitton, Georgia State Univ.

2. "Contextualizing Conventions: Technology in Business Writing Classrooms," Suanna H. Davis, Houston Community Coll., Central Coll., TX

3. "Teaching Business Communication through Simulation Games," Katherine V. Wills, Indiana Univ.–Purdue Univ., Columbus

Women and Lexicography

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Lexicography. Presiding: Lindsay Rose Russell, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Poet Laura (Riding) Jackson's Lexicographical Turn," Anett Kristin Jessop, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "Simple Definitions: Johnson and the Lexis of Naïveté," Stephanie Hershinow, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

3. "Late-Twentieth-Century Feminist Lexicography," Lindsay Rose Russell

Theme of War in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Drama

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Drama. Presiding: Robert M. Shannon, Saint Joseph's Univ.

1. "Military Values in Agustín Moreto's La misma conciencia acusa," Tania de Miguel Magro, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

2. "The Expendable Ones: Black Men, Cross-Dressers, and Effetes in Claramonte's El valiente negro en Flandes," Nelson López, Bellarmine Univ.

3. "War Machines: Instrumentality, Empire, and Utopia in Early Modern Spanish Drama," Cory A. Reed, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Reconfiguring the Scholarly Edition

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Susan Schreibman, Trinity Coll. Dublin

Speakers: Michael R. Best, Univ. of Victoria; John Bryant, Hofstra Univ.; Alexander Gil, Univ. of Virginia; Elizabeth Grove-White, Univ. of Victoria; Grant Simpson, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; John A. Walsh, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

New theories of editing have broadened the approaches available to editors of scholarly editions. Noteworthy amongst these are the changes brought about by editing for digital publication. New methods for digital scholarship, forms of editions, theories informing digital publication, and tools offer exciting alternatives to traditional notions of the scholarly edition.

Food Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages. Presiding: Catharine Theimer Nepomnyashchy, Columbia Univ.

1. "Finding 'Poetry in Mayonnaise': Food Writing, Print Culture, and the Reading Public in Ninteenth-Century Russia," Bella Grigoryan, Yale Univ.

2. "Soviet Hamburgers: Stalin, Mikoyan, and the Fate of Boris Pilnyak's Miaso: Roman," Ronald LeBlanc, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

3. "'Kremlin Cookery': Late- and Post-Soviet Culinary Writing in Russia," Alison K. Smith, Univ. of Toronto

Bodily Evidence

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the Victorian Period. Presiding: Elaine C. Freedgood, New York Univ.

1. "The Evidence of the Hand," Sue Zemka, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

2. "A Face without Eyes: Hands, Evidence, and Racial Identity," Aviva Briefel, Bowdoin Coll.

3. "Evidence in and of the Transimperial Framework of Sensation Fiction," Sukanya Banerjee, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Women's Utopian and Dystopian Fiction

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Science Fiction and Utopian and Fantastic Literature. Presiding: Sharon R. Wilson, Univ. of Northern Colorado

1. "The Hand That Cradles the Rock: Feminist Utopias in the Works of Carol Emshwiller and Ursula Le Guin," Richard Hardack, Berkeley, CA

2. "Feeling at the End of the World: Affect in Postmodern Feminist Dystopias," Tyler Bradway, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "Reenvisioning the Purdah: Heterotopia in Rokeya Hossain's Sultana's Dream," Nathan Fuhr, Univ. of Northern Colorado

4. "Personal Trauma and Global Apocalypse in Atwood's Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood," Katherine V. Snyder, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Historical Fictions, Fictional Histories: Shaping History, Politics, and Time

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on German Literature to 1700. Presiding: Katja Altpeter-Jones, Lewis and Clark Coll.

1. "The Corrupt Chronicle: The Politics of Fictionalizing History in the Kaiserchronik," Gráinne Watson, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2. "Traces of Truth: The Legal-Historical Difference between Eilhart's and Gottfried's Flour Test and Its Epistemological Import," Mary Marshall Campbell, Princeton Univ.

3. "Difficulties in Paratext, Relief in Translation: History and Fiction in Early Modern (German) Novels," Jan Hon, Ludwig Maximilian Univ.

Form and Ideology

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism. Presiding: Marshall J. Brown, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Forms, Memes, and Ideologemes," Srinivas Aravamudan, Duke Univ.

2. "Reading for Realism," Colleen Lye, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Formalism as Ideology, Form as Critique," Walter Benn Michaels, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

Career Opportunities in Two-Year Colleges

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the ADE Executive Committee and ADFL Executive Committee. Presiding: Lisa R. Schneider, Columbus State Community Coll., OH

Speakers: Garry Fourman, Columbus State Community Coll., OH; William Thomas Little, Santa Fe Coll.; Susan Miller, Santa Fe Coll.; Lisa R. Schneider

Faculty members in English and foreign languages will discuss the career opportunities that exist at two-year colleges, with a special focus on job seekers who are starting their careers.

Shakespeare and Property

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Shakespeare. Presiding: Katharine Eisaman Maus, Univ. of Virginia

1. "If Tables Had Feelings: Property and Affect," Donald Hedrick, Kansas State Univ.

2. "Double Falsehood and Other Shakespearean Properties," Barbara Fuchs, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Properties of Critique: Timon’s Gold and the Political Economy of Social Criticism," David Hershinow, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

Modes of Transport: Media, Genre, and Nineteenth-Century United States Poetry

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 303, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Eliza Richards, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Filler," Meredith L. McGill, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "Emancipated Lines: Frederick Douglass's Uses of Poetry," Cody Marrs, Univ. of Georgia

3. "Poetry under Fire: Henry Howard Brownell's 'Newspaper-Poetry, by a Volunteer in the US Service,'" Eliza Richards

Literary Multilingualism and Exile in Twentieth-Century Fiction

Saturday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Salvatore Pappalardo, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Multilingualism and the Construction of a Hybrid Identity in Twentieth-Century Judeo-French Literature," Celine Piser, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Jack Kerouac's Translingual Exile," Hassan Melehy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "Ahksent on Last Syllable: Mispronunciation in Nabokov's American Novels," Maria Kager, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

MLA Delegate Assembly

Saturday, 1:00 p.m., 6B, WSCC

Presiding: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park

Using Your Foreign Language Proficiency and Cultural Expertise in the Federal Government

Saturday, 1:30–3:30 p.m., 2B, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Research. Presiding: Rusty Shughart, Office of the Dept. of National Intelligence

Speakers: Jon Crocitto, United States Dept. of State; Richard Donovan, Defense Language Inst.; Tiwanna Fields-Coleman, National Security Agency; Maha Hanna, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Julie Johnson, United States Dept. of State; Douglas Kouril, National Virtual Translation Center; William Rivers, National Language Service Corps; Patrice Shackleford, National Security Agency; Peter Sursi, Federal Bureau of Investigation

An overview of federal careers that utilize foreign language and cultural expertise--translator, interpreter, instructor, intelligence analyst, language analyst, foreign language program manager, foreign service officer, and law enforcement officer. Recruiters and subject-matter experts from agencies will discuss opportunities and the application process.

Emerging Paradigms for Teaching Literature, Language, and Culture

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language. Presiding: Stacey Katz Bourns, Harvard Univ.

1. "To Teach Language, Literature, and Culture: Proposals for the Next Decade," Charlotte Ann Melin, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "Bridging the Gap in the Professional Development and Socialization of Teaching Assistants," Nicole Mills, Harvard Univ.

3. "On the Urgency of Going Online in Theory and Practice at the Research University," Will Hasty, Univ. of Florida

Queering Puget Sound

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Gay Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Brenna M. Munro, Univ. of Miami

1. "Mapping Puget Sound's Queer Geographies," Kathryn R. Kent, Williams Coll.

2. "The Group and the Tribe: Queer Politics and Puget Sound Cinema," Theresa L. Geller, Grinnell Coll.

3. "Local Scenes and Their Archives: Olympia and Austin in the 1990s," Ann L. Cvetkovich, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Respondent: Bethany Schneider, Bryn Mawr Coll.

Reimagining the Nation: New Foundational Fictions

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature. Presiding: Cristina Ferreira-Pinto Bailey, Washington and Lee Univ.

1. "Being Portuguese in Spanish: Rethinking Early Modern Peninsular Identity," Jonathan Wade, Meredith Coll.

2. "'If You Plant . . .' It Will Wither: Ignacio de Loyola Brandão and the Narrative of Negation," Renata R. M. Wasserman, Wayne State Univ.

3. "João Almino's Cidade livre: A Foundational Novel of the New Urban Brazil?" Alamir Correa, Universidade Estadual de Londrina

4. "Lia Vieira and the Reconceptualization of the Metaphor of the Nation," Katia C. Bezerra, Univ. of Arizona

For abstracts, write to Pinto-BaileyAC@wlu.edu after 15 Dec.

Success Stories in Global Studies

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Rosmarie T. Morewedge, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York; Mari Noda, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

1. "Best Practices from the Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum Consortium," Diana Kalinda Davies, Princeton Univ.

2. "Developing a Business Curriculum for an International MBA Program: A MIM (Master of International Management) Model," Meiru Liu, Portland State Univ.

3. "The Cross-Disciplinary Global Studies Agenda at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee," Patrice Petro, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

4. "Interdisciplinary Models for Foreign Language Education in the Context of Globalization," Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl, Yale Univ.

Voice and Identity in Australian Literature

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Association of Australian Literary Studies. Presiding: Nathanael O'Reilly, Texas Christian Univ.

1. "Death by Torture in the Country of the Mind: Metaphors of Captivity and Freedom in Patrick White's Voss (1957)," Jennifer McGovern, Univ. of Iowa

2. "The Un-death of Maggs: The Returned Convict as Revenant in Jack Maggs," Sarah Chihaya, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Suburban Space and Multicultural Identities in Christos Tsiolkas's The Slap," Nicholas Dunlop, Univ. of Birmingham

4. "Rejecting Suburban Identity in George Johnston's My Brother Jack," Nathanael O'Reilly

Twenty-First-Century Stevens: Modernism and Its Aftermaths

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the Wallace Stevens Society. Presiding: Lee M. Jenkins, University Coll., Cork; Edward Ragg, Tsinghua Univ.

1. "Flying out of Sight? How the Critical Paradigms of World Literature and Genetic Criticism Affect Stevens's Place within the Modernist Canon," Bart P. Eeckhout, Univ. of Antwerp

2. "Reexamining Wallace Stevens in a Time of War," Rachel Galvin, Princeton Univ.

3. "Of Critics and Connoisseurs: Historicism and Stevens's Place in American Literary History," Patrick Redding, Manhattanville Coll.

4. "Meditations on the Authoritarian Character: Stevens and Fascism," Jill Richards, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Boccaccio

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Boccaccio Association. Presiding: Marilyn Migiel, Cornell Univ.

1. "Queen for One Day: Pampinea's Unreliable Leadership in Boccaccio's Decameron," Valerio C. Ferme, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

2. "The Problematic Relationship between Narrative Fiction and Knowledge in Boccaccio's Decameron," Thomas Klinkert, Univ. of Freiburg

3. "Boccaccio versus Petrarca: Friendship, Greed, and the Civic Responsibility of Poetry," David Lummus, Yale Univ.

A Minor American Literature: The Greek American Case

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Kirkland, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Modern Greek Studies Association. Presiding: George Fragopoulos, Queensborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "The Discursive Limits of Ethnicity: Writing and Erasing Ethnicity in The (Diblos) Notebook," George Fragopoulos

2. "Elia Kazan's Arrangements," Jim Cocola, Worcester Polytechnic Inst.

3. "The Biopolitics of Ethnicity in Jeffrey Eugenides’s Middlesex," Yanoula Athanassakis, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

For panel information, blog, and abstracts, visit minoramericanliterature.wordpress.com.

Looking Back at Beckett

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Samuel Beckett Society. Presiding: Jean-Michel Rabaté, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Samuel Beckett and Georges Duthuit: An Epistolary Trace of a Volcanic Friendship," Dan Gunn, American Univ. in Paris

2. "Samuel Beckett: The Poor Bastard; or, The Work of Destitution," Lance Duerfahrd, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

3. "Faux départs: The Textual Genesis of Beckett's All Strange Away and Imagination Dead Imagine," Mark Nixon, Reading Univ.

Questions concerning Canonicity: Critical Receptions of Doris Lessing's Fiction

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Doris Lessing Society. Presiding: Virginia Tiger, Rutgers Univ., Newark

1. "Questions concerning Canonicity: The Critical Reception of Doris Lessing's Fiction," Alice Rachel Ridout, Algoma Univ.

2. "Lessing's Archetypal and Impressionistic Shorter Fiction: 'Dialogue' and 'One off the Short List,'" Sharon R. Wilson, Univ. of Northern Colorado

3. "Uncanny Canonicity: The Strangeness of The Grass Is Singing," Dorian Stuber, Hendrix Coll.

4. "Migration and Doris Lessing's Cosmopolitanism," Sandra Singer, Univ. of Guelph

Frenemies? Medical Humanities and Disability Studies

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession. Presiding: Sara van den Berg, Saint Louis Univ.

1. "Chronic Illness, Disability Studies, and the Health Humanities," Rebecca Garden, Upstate Medical Univ., State Univ. of New York

2. "Power and Coexistence: Intersections between the Medical and Social Models of Disability," Johnson Cheu, Michigan State Univ.

3. "Is Empathy Enough? Knowledgeable Stories of Schizophrenia as Challenge to Medical Humanities," Mary Wood, Univ. of Oregon

Respondent: Diane Price Herndl, Univ. of South Florida

Principles of Exclusion: The Future of the Nineteenth-Century Archive

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Lloyd P. Pratt, Univ. of Oxford, Linacre Coll.

1. "Missing Links; or, Girls of Today, Archives of Tomorrow," William A. Gleason, Princeton Univ.

2. "Anonymity, Authorship, and Digital Archives in American Literature," Elizabeth Lorang, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

3. "Dashed Hopes: Small-Scale Digital Archives of the 1990s," Amy Earhart, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

IMF Culture: The Irish Experience

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Anglo-Irish Literature. Presiding: Gregory J. Dobbins, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "Gothic Contracts on a Global Stage," Laura B. O'Connor, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "All about the Boy? Trauma in Contemporary Irish Coming-of-Age Fiction," Anne C. Fogarty, University Coll. Dublin

3. "Tiger Noir: Fiction after the Fall," Gregory R. Castle, Arizona State Univ.

Urban Culture: Literature and the City in Early Modern Asia

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures to 1900. Presiding: Charlotte Eubanks, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Poetry in Action: Poetry Networks, Collective Performances, and New Literary Canons in Eighteenth-Century Seoul," Jamie Jungmin Yoo, Harvard Univ.

2. "Exploring International Urban Spaces in Japanese Travel Narratives of the Late Nineteenth Century," Orna Shaughnessy, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Visual Vernacular: Rebus, Reading, and Urban Culture in Early Modern Japan," Charlotte Eubanks

For abstracts, write to cde13@psu.edu after 1 Dec.

The Literary Critic as Anthropologist

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Anthropological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Elsie Browning Michie, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

1. "The 'Anthropologist' Position in Literary Theory: Covert Ethnocentrism?" James Andrew Cowell, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

2. "The Joy of Waiting: A Literary-Anthropological Take on Thinking Hope from the South," Scott Teal, Univ. of Oxford, Wolfson Coll.

3. "Anthropolit(crit)ical Temporalities: Myths of the (Post)Human," John Paul Riquelme, Boston Univ.

Indigenous Textual Cultures

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Bibliography and Textual Studies. Presiding: Sarah Brouillette, Carleton Univ.

1. "Book History and the Indigenous Americas," Matt Cohen, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "Ethnography and the Indigenous Archive in Canada," Marc Fortin, Queen's Univ.

3. "Whose Land of Sunshine? The Economics of Ethnography in Progressive-Era Los Angeles," Sigrid Anderson Cordell, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

4. "Hendrick Aupaumut's Mistakes," Katherine L. Chiles, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

"This Is Not a Thing": Rethinking Romantic Materiality

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period. Presiding: Celeste G. Langan, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "What Wordsworth Touched," Sonia Hofkosh, Tufts Univ.

2. "Specimen Poetics; or, Reanimating the Romantic Object," Dahlia J. Porter, Vanderbilt Univ.

3. "Gothic-Network-Materiality," Yoon-Sun Lee, Wellesley Coll.

4. "Marx's Romantic Atom," Amanda Goldstein, Cornell Univ.

Medieval Race and Ethnicity

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Medieval Literature. Presiding: Nicole Nolan Sidhu, East Carolina Univ.

1. "The Other through the Eyes of Another Other: Early Modern Jewish Epic and Islam," Jerold C. Frakes, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

2. "Contesting Racial and Religious Oppression through Prophecy: Khaqani of Shirwani's Christian Qasida," Rebecca Gould, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin

3. "Race, Place, and Dietary Primitivism in Medieval Cosmography," Alexander Wolfe, Univ. of Chicago

4. "The 'Cruel and Evil People' of the Holy Land," Tara Foster, Northern Michigan Univ.

Sticker Shock: The Rising Cost of Textbooks

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Community Colleges. Presiding: David Forrest Stout, Portland Community Coll., OR

1. "Lopsided Playing Fields: The High Cost of College Textbooks and Its Distinct Impact on Community Colleges," Falk Cammin, Foothill Coll., CA

2. "Creating and Curating: How the Open Educational Resources Movement Is Transforming College Writing and Reading," Miles McCrimmon, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community Coll., VA

3. "A Patchwork of Sorts: Free Online Materials as Alternatives to Costly Textbooks," Shirin E. Edwin, Sam Houston State Univ.

Rethinking Fascism and Communism: Eastern European Film since 1980

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on European Literary Relations. Presiding: Monique Yaari, Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Hungarian Films in Times of Transition," Clara E. Orban, DePaul Univ.

2. "Rethinking Socialism and Fascism in Post-Yugoslav Cinemas," Etami Borjan, Univ. of Zagreb

3. "The Legacies of Ceauşescu: Gender and Everyday Life in the Films of the Romanian New Wave," Lance Lubelski, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

The Seattle Sound

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture. Presiding: Hillary L. Chute, Univ. of Chicago

1. "Theory Alone Nothing; Theory plus Dancing Change the World: The Seattle Sound of Sleater-Kinney and Hendrix," Lindsay E. Waters, Harvard Univ. Press

2. "Nirvana: Noise and Empathy," John Melillo, New York Univ.

3. "Virginia Woolf in the Trailer Park: Isaac Brock; Nowhere, WA; and the Lonesome, Crowded West," John McCombe, Univ. of Dayton

Modern Love at 150: Reassessing George Meredith's Poetry

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 612, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Rebecca Mitchell, Univ. of Texas–Pan American

1. "'Have Her Quite Scraggy to Have Her Quite Poetical': Meredith, Gender, and Form," Melissa Jenkins, Wake Forest Univ.

2. "'Love's Nerveless Body': Losing Consciousness in George Meredith's Lyrics," Elisha Cohn, Cornell Univ.

3. "Modernity in Meredith's 'Shemselnihar' and 'Cassandra,'" Criscillia A. Benford, Stanford Univ.

Colonial Canvases: Texts and Portraits in Early Spanish America

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Cristian Roa, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

1. "Representing Quetzalcoatl in the Florentine Codex: Overlapping Visual and Verbal Literacies and the Encyclopedic Organization of Knowledge," Cristian Roa

2. "Retrato poético y cultura visual en las Elegías de varones ilustres de Indias, de Juan de Castellanos (1589)," Raul Marrero-Fente, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

3. "Portraying Deformity in the Arts: The Textual and Visual Representations of the Criollo Playwright Juan Ruiz de Alarcón," Raul Alvarez-Moreno, Univ. of British Columbia

4. "Portraits of Indigenous Crowned Nuns: Visible Traces of Colonial Rhetoric," Monica Diaz, Georgia State Univ.

For papers and images, visit www.msu.edu/~quispeag.

Sylvie Germain in Dialogue

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Matthew Moyle, Emory Univ.

1. "Sylvie Germain and Edmond Jabès: Epiphany as Dance and Death," Van Kelly, Univ. of Kansas

2. "Sylvie Germain and Pierre Michon: Writing on the Black Background," Marilène Haroux, Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth

3. "Pile ou Face? Sylvie Germain's Intertextual Dialogue with Guillaume Apollinaire in Chanson des Mal-Aimants," Amy L. Allen Sekhar, Univ. of Indianapolis

For abstracts, visit mla2012.matthewmoyle.com after 10 Dec.

Transatlantic Women's Humor in the Nineteenth Century

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Amanda Smith, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

1. "The 'Transatlantic' and the Nineteenth-Century American Women's Humor Tradition," Margaret Diane Stetz, Univ. of Delaware, Newark

2. "Not a Laughing Matter: Parody as Feminist Humor and Resistance in Phoebe Cary," Elizabeth Petrino, Fairfield Univ.

3. "Looking on the Funny Side through the Lens of a New Woman from Both Sides of the Pond," Valerie A. Fehlbaum, Univ. of Geneva

4. "'A Deuced Clever Woman': Sarah Grand's Comic Disturbances," Amanda Smith

Democracy, Language, and Literature

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Metropolitan A, Sheraton

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum The Presidential Forum: Language, Literature, Learning (202). Presiding: Gaurav G. Desai, Tulane Univ.

1. "Citizen Journalism in Iran," Negar Mottahedeh, Duke Univ.

2. "Chronicles of States Foreclosed: Writing and the Claims of Nationhood," Ana María Dopico, New York Univ.

3. "Jianghu (Rivers and Lakes) Online: A Contemporary Reincarnation of Outlaws of the Marsh," Hui Faye Xiao, Univ. of Kansas

Arguments in defense of the humanities and literary study in particular often assert a profound connection to democracy and citizenship. Does this claim regarding the civic value of literature hold in a comparative and global framework? Does democracy require a literary literacy? Presentations on Iran, Cuba, and China explore issues of literary culture, protest movements, democracy, and new technologies.

New Directions in Language Science and Literary Study

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science and the Division on Linguistic Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Patrick Colm Hogan, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

1. "A Critical Meditation on a Science-of-Language Approach to Literature," Frederick Luis Aldama, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "Linguistic Interfaces and Artistic Expressions: Negotiating the Visual and the Literary," Javier Gutiérrez-Rexach, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "The Role of Community in Semantic Interpretation," Michael Hegarty, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex–Colored Man: A Century Later

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Gene Andrew Jarrett, Boston Univ.

1. "Music, Race, and Nation in Johnson's Autobiography," Erich Nunn, Auburn Univ., Auburn

2. "An Old Negro in a New Century: Locating the Southern Slave in Johnson's Autobiography," Adena Spingarn, Harvard Univ.

3. "The Ex-Colored among Us: Johnson's Autobiography and the New Millennial Multiracialism," Michele Elam, Stanford Univ.

4. "Pragmatic Nationalism in Johnson's Autobiography," Michael Clay Hooper, Prairie View A&M Univ.

Translation and World Literature

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sevinc Turkkan, State Univ. of New York, Brockport

1. "The Formation of an Early Modern Transcultural Narrative Aesthetic in China," Geraldine Fiss, Univ. of Southern California

2. "Translating More Than Windmills: Lessons from El Quijote," Kathryn A. Radford, McGill Univ.

3. "Two or Three Ideas: Translating Grzegorz Wróblewski's Kopenhaga," Piotr Gwiazda, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County

Respondent: David Damrosch, Harvard Univ.

For papers, write to turkkan2@illinois.edu.

Food and Culture: Somatic Semantics

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Peter McIsaac, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1. "Regionalism and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century German Cookbooks," Karin Pagel-Meiners, Lawrence, KS

2. "Experimenting on the Stomach: Nietzsche's Diets and His Ethics," Carmen Bartl, New York Univ.

3. "What's Eating K.? Species Identity and the Violence of Food in the Work of Franz Kafka," Andrea Dahlmann-Resing, Univ. of British Columbia

Reading Writing Interfaces: Electronic Literature's Past and Present

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Marjorie Luesebrink, Irvine Valley Coll., CA

1. "Early Authors of E-Literature, Platforms of the Past," Dene M. Grigar, Washington State Univ., Vancouver

2. "Seven Types of Interface in the Electronic Literature Collection Volume Two," Marjorie Luesebrink; Stephanie Strickland, New York, NY

3. "The Digital Poem against the Interface Free," Lori A. Emerson, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

4. "Strange Rain and the Poetics of Motion and Touch," Mark L. Sample, George Mason Univ.

For abstracts, visit loriemerson.net.

Islamic Discourse in Global Literature in the Post-9/11 Era

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Beyazit Akman, Illinois State Univ.

Speakers: Nadia R. Altschul, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD; Filiz Barin, Illinois State Univ.; Padmaja N. Challakere, Saint Catherine Univ.; Manori Neelika Jayawardane, State Univ. of New York, Oswego; Rania Mahmoud, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Harveen Sachdeva Mann, Loyola Univ., Chicago; Emel Tastekin, Univ. of British Columbia

Amidst the discussions of "Islamic radicalization" and "homegrown terror" in the United States, liberation movements in the Middle East, and the war in Libya, the discourse on Islam has once again dominated the discussions of the global intelligentsia in the post-9/11 era. Speakers discuss how different writers from diverse cultures around the globe perceive and represent the Islamic discourse in literature.

From Conchita Piquer to Isabel Pantoja: Divas and the Spanish Cultural Imaginary

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Silvia Bermúdez, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Speakers: José Colmeiro, Univ. of Auckland; Luis Cuesta, Univ. of California, Los Angeles; Jorge P. Pérez, Univ. of Kansas; Israel Rolón-Barada, Univ. of Cincinnati; Stephanie Anne Sieburth, Duke Univ.; Eva Woods Peiró, Vassar Coll.

How can we explain the enduring presence of diva and folkloric performers in twentieth-century Spanish culture? Panelists will present briefly on folclórica culture in the 1910s and 1920s, folclóricas as working women, transgressive and conservative filmic roles in the Franco era, folkloric performers' excessive Spanishness, divas' transatlantic and gay appeal, and the formation of conflicting fan groups. Half the session will be devoted to discussion.

For abstracts, write to rjohnson@ku.edu after 1 Dec.

Rereading Mary Wroth

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 604, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Andrew T. Strycharski, Florida International Univ.

Speakers: Ilona D. Bell, Williams Coll.; Margaret P. Hannay, Siena Coll.; Clare R. Kinney, Univ. of Virginia; Katherine R. Larson, Univ. of Toronto; Naomi J. Miller, Smith Coll.

This panel convenes five established and up-and-coming Wroth scholars for a discussion of how and why to reread one of the first canonized women writers of the English Renaissance now that the value of reading her has been firmly established. Panelists all have recent or forthcoming major works that together promise to set the tone for Wroth studies into the next two decades.

Young Hemingway

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society. Presiding: Nicole Camastra, Univ. of Georgia

1. "Hemingway's Oak Park: The Road to Embracing Racial Paradox," Margaret E. Wright-Cleveland, Florida State Univ.

2. "Journalism, Democracy, and the Protocols of Simplicity in the Young Hemingway," Alexander Hollenberg, Univ. of Toronto

3. "'A Sweetly Acrid Quality': Sniffing Around Scenes of (Failed) Instruction," Patrick Bonds, Troy Univ.

Eighteenth-Century Mediations

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature. Presiding: Ruth Mack, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "Pope's Grotto Life and Eloisa to Abelard," Julie J. Park, Vassar Coll.

2. "Sonorous Mediation: The Rhythm of Discourse in Tristram Shandy," Amit Yahav, Univ. of Haifa

3. "Mediating Mobility," Kevis Goodman, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Shuttling to Learn

Saturday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society. Presiding: Frank Farmer, Univ. of Kansas

1. "Shuttling between Languages: From Product to Process in Translingual Writing," A. Suresh Canagarajah, Penn State Univ., University Park

2. "Autoethnography, Hybridity, and Cultural Identity," Patricia A. Sullivan, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

3. "Navigating Different Voices in the Hybrid College Essay," Sarah Ruth Jacobs, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York

Respondent: Frank Farmer

#alt-ac: Alternative Paths, Pitfalls, and Jobs in the Digital Humanities

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 3B, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Sara Steger, Univ. of Georgia

Speakers: Brian Croxall, Emory Univ.; Julia H. Flanders, Brown Univ.; Matthew Jockers, Stanford Univ.; Shana Kimball, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Bethany Nowviskie, Univ. of Virginia; Lisa Spiro, National Inst. for Tech. in Liberal Education

This roundtable brings together various perspectives on alternative academic careers from professionals in digital humanities centers, libraries, publishing, and humanities labs. Speakers will discuss how and whether digital humanities is especially suited to fostering non-tenure-track positions and how that translates to the role of alt-ac in digital humanities and the academy. Related session: "#alt-ac: The Future of 'Alternative Academic' Careers" (595).

Educational Linguistics: Civility, Critical Pedagogy, Teacher Training

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on General Linguistics. Presiding: Marnie Jo Petray, California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo

Speakers: Lynn Burley, Univ. of Central Arkansas; Maite Correa, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins; Gladys Vega Scott, William Paterson Univ.; Mary Wildner-Bassett, Univ. of Arizona

Respondent: Seunghun J. Lee, Central Connecticut State Univ.

This roundtable presents research and discussion on controversies in educational linguistics and teacher training, including educating stakeholders in civil discourse for transcultural societies, advocating critical pedagogies for teachers of Spanish as a heritage language, investigating K–12 second-language writing as a casualty of No Child Left Behind, and exploring innovations in the K–12 education curriculum.

For abstracts, write to mpetray@calpoly.edu after 15 Dec.

Literature and Other Arts in the Twenty-First Century: Intermediality, Interart Studies, Media History?

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Other Arts. Presiding: Anke K. Finger, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

Speakers: Mary Ann Caws, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Claus Cluver, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Ilka Kressner, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Jon McKenzie, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; W. J. T. Mitchell, Univ. of Chicago

This roundtable brings together some contributors from the 1990 MLA volume Teaching Literature and Other Arts, in addition to other specialists, for a discussion on questions and challenges in the area of literature and other arts in the twenty-first century.

Exaltadas: Women and Transcendentalism

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Margaret Fuller Society. Presiding: Jana L. Argersinger, Washington State Univ., Pullman

1. "What Margaret Thought of George," Gary Williams, Univ. of Idaho

2. "Female Transcendentalist Poetry," Jennifer Anne Gurley, Le Moyne Coll.

3. "Going against the Bias: Transcendentalism from Margaret Fuller to Mary Wilkins Freeman," Susan M. Stone, Loras Coll.

4. "Elizabeth Palmer Peabody: Woman of the Nineteenth Century," Phyllis B. Cole, Penn State Univ., Brandywine

Respondent: Jeffrey Allen Steele, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Conrad and Faulkner: Revisiting the Modern

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 607, WSCC

Program arranged by the Joseph Conrad Society of America and the William Faulkner Society. Presiding: Christopher GoGwilt, Fordham Univ., Bronx

1. "'O Brother Where Art Thou?': Conrad and Faulkner's Circumatlantic Locations," Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

2. "Unsettling Voices and Social Critique in Light in August and Nostromo," Marta Puxan, Pompeu Fabra Univ., Barcelona

3. "'Through His Lips from the Past': Narrative Resonance in Absalom, Absalom! and Lord Jim," Julie Napolin, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Transnational and Transcultural Perspectives on Early Modern Women

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. Presiding: Mihoko Suzuki, Univ. of Miami

1. "The Spanish Court in London, Mary Tudor Abroad," J. Christopher Warner, Le Moyne Coll.

2. "'Thy Prisoner, but Not Thy Slave': Translating Civil and International Wars in the Plays of Katherine Philips," Penelope Anderson, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

3. "The Mapping of Central Asia in Delarivier Manley's The Royal Mischief (1696)," Bernadette Andrea, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio

German Graduate Education 2020: Strategies for the Future

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of German. Presiding: Karin Baumgartner, Univ. of Utah

Speakers: Kerstin Barndt, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Jaimey Fisher, Univ. of California, Davis; Peter A. Hess, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Peter C. Pfeiffer, Georgetown Univ.; Ann Marie Rasmussen, Duke Univ.

Roundtable on the place of German in tomorrow's university. How are we training graduate students in German programs to adjust to a changed landscape and secure a place for German in the new pared-down humanities curricula? Panelists will discuss how their departments have adapted to the crisis in German, how graduate training incorporates cross- and interdisciplinary tracks, and what the place of literature is in the new "practical" curricula.

John Clare: Writing, Identity, and Culture

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the John Clare Society of North America. Presiding: Matthew Russell, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

1. "Mediating Loss: John Clare and Poetic Form," Toby Benis, Saint Louis Univ.

2. "Decompositions: Decay and Forgetting in Charlotte Smith and John Clare," Matthew Russell

3. "Lodging in the Wilderness: Cowper and Clare in Retreat," Tim Fulford, Nottingham Trent Univ.

Joyce: Memory, History, Forgetting

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the International James Joyce Foundation. Presiding: Ellen Carol Jones, Columbus, OH

1. "The Great War: Covering and Forgetting," Amanda Sigler, Univ. of Virginia

2. "Ulysses and the Sugar Cube: Joyce's Bergson," Enda Duffy, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

3. "Spectral Politics," Ellen Carol Jones

4. "A Commons-Place Book: Joyce's Memory Place in Reverse," Jennifer Wicke, Univ. of Virginia

American Drama Seventy-Five Years after O'Neill's Nobel Prize

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by the Eugene O'Neill Society. Presiding: Kurt Eisen, Tennessee Tech Univ.

1. "What Is the Porter's Past? Temporality in The Emperor Jones," Molly H. Hiro, Univ. of Portland

2. "Uneasy Lie the Heads That Wear the Crowns: Contradiction and Communal Spirits in The Emperor Jones and King Hedley II," Donald P. Gagnon, Western Connecticut State Univ.

3. "American Realist Drama and the Dysfunctional Family: Eugene O'Neill to Tracy Letts via Edward Albee and Sam Shepard," John O'Connor, Fairmont State Univ.

Imaginarios puertorriqueños del fracaso

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Puerto Rican Literature and Culture. Presiding: Carmelo Esterrich, Columbia Coll., IL

1. "El 'pensamiento en grietas' en la poesía de Urayoán Noel," Judith Sierra-Rivera, Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Colonial Sublimations of a Noir Eros: On Edgardo Rodríguez Juliá's Police Novels," Benigno Trigo, Vanderbilt Univ.

Stasis and Constraint

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Philosophical Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Eleanor Kaufman, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "The Aesthetics of Constructivism," Herman Rapaport, Wake Forest Univ.

2. "Freedom through Constraints," Tracy McNulty, Cornell Univ.

3. "Stasis in Motion: Monumental Gestures in Kierkegaard and Henry James," Anne-Lise François, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Lady of the Lakes: Harriet Martineau and the New Age of Reason

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the College English Association. Presiding: Karen Lentz Madison, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville

1. "The Hour and the Woman: Martineau’s Haiti," Robert D. Madison, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville

2. "Harriet Martineau and Nineteenth-Century America's Hasty Enterprise," Andrew Kopec, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "Deerbrook's Dissent: Harriet Martineau's Nonconforming Portrayal of Non-Anglicans," Michael Sobiech, Western Kentucky Univ.

4. "Mapping 'Wordsworthshire': Martineau and the Literary Geography of the Lakes," Christopher Donaldson, Stanford Univ.

China in the World: Literature, Geopolitics, and World Culture

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the MLA Executive Council. Presiding: Ban Wang, Stanford Univ.

Speakers: Yomi Braester, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Wendy Larson, Univ. of Oregon; Lydia H. Liu, Columbia Univ.; Xiaobing Tang, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scholars in Chinese and East-West comparative literature will discuss China's growing influence and its deepening conversation with the world. As China grows into a world power, the study of its literature, culture, and history is taking different shapes and moving in new directions. The panelists will analyze national and international aspects of Chinese literature, arts, and thought; explore developments in popular culture and media; rethink the political implications of cultural production; discuss translation and the appropriation of Euro-American traditions; and articulate Chinese visions of world order.

Print Culture and Cultural Practices

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Early-Nineteenth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Claire Baldwin, Colgate Univ.

1. "Dwelling in Letters: The Epistolary Framework of Nineteenth-Century Women Authors," Lena Heilmann, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Vor-Lesen: Romantic Sociability at the Intersection of Scholarly Lecturing and Literary Declamation," Sean B. Franzel, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

3. "Bescheidenheit und Urbanität: Mediale Strategien und kulturelle Praktiken der Ästhetisierung des Lebens in der 'Zeitung für die Elegante Welt,'" Anna Ananieva, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

What Was the Modernist Novel? Three Appraisals

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 6A, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Jesse E. Matz, Kenyon Coll.

1. "Formal Innovation and History in the Modernist Novel," Stephen Kern, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "The 'Modern Element' Revisited," Jesse E. Matz, Kenyon Coll.

3. "The Work of Unknowing," Philip M. Weinstein, Swarthmore Coll.

Realisms in Italian Culture

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Italian Literature. Presiding: Manuela Marchesini, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

1. "Ethereal Realism and Perelà: A Negative Plate of Futurism's 'Uomo Nuovo,'" Stephen Marth, Brown Univ.

2. "'I negri ci guardano': African American Literature and Italian Neorealism," Charles L. Leavitt, Univ. of Notre Dame

3. "Radical Neo(Realism) in the Works of Cesare Zavattini," Etami Borjan, Univ. of Zagreb

4. "Contro il 'pregiudizio di realtà': Il caso di Leonardo Pica Ciamarra," Domenico Cangiano, Duke Univ.

For abstracts, write to mmarchesini@tamu.edu after 20 Dec.

Mapping the Transnational: Indigenous and Aboriginal Literatures across the US–Canadian Border

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Beth H. Piatote, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Jaywalking, Moses, and the Mighty River Onguiaahra (Niagara)," Vera B. Bauer Palmer, Dartmouth Coll.

2. "Uranium without Borders: Silko's Ceremony and Clements's Burning Vision," Molly Wallace, Queen's Univ.

3. "Theorizing Transnational Indigenous Gender Justice in Literature and Film," Cheryl L. Suzack, Univ. of Toronto

Teaching Cervantes: Cognitive Theories and Early Modern Subjectivity

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Amy R. Williamsen, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

Speakers: Catherine M. Connor, Univ. of Vermont; Sarah Gretter, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette; Barbara Simerka, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York; Julien Jacques Simon, Indiana Univ. East; Steven Wagschal, Univ. of Indiana, Bloomington

Respondent: Amy R. Williamsen

This roundtable demonstrates the value of cognitive literary studies for teaching about subject formation in Cervantine texts. We use cognitive historicism to teach psychologized subjectivity and to show connections between medical philosophy and theory of mind. We propose cognitive models of the unconscious as alternatives to psychoanalysis. We use neuroscience research to teach empathy and humor as sources of resistance to race, class, and gender hierarchies.

For abstracts, visit simerkabara@gmail.com after 15 Dec.

Lookin' at You, Kid: New Postcolonial, Ontological, and Experimental Takes on Film Subjectivity

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Ruth Yvonne Hsu, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

1. "'I’m Interested in Cinema': Abbas Kiarostami’s Spectator-Cinephiles," Sara Saljoughi, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

2. "Blind Cinema: Interrupting the Spectator’s Three Gazes," Brian Bergen-Aurand, Nanyang Technological Univ.

3. "Variations on a Theme of Romance and Difference: Melodrama Meets Heteropatriarchal Normativity," Vivian Chin, Mills Coll.

4. "Toward Anticolonial Spectatorship: Gendered Portrayals of Native Hawaiian Men in Recent Hawai'i-Based Short Films and Their Mixed Reception by Some Hawai'i Viewers," Ida Yoshinaga, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

Torture and Sentiment: Laurence Sterne's Fiction and Sermons

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Scarlet K. Bowen, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

1. "Man or Men on the Rack? The Problem of Suffering and Equality in Sterne and Smith," Stephanie DeGooyer, Cornell Univ.

2. "Laurence Sterne: Torture, Kinship, and Slavery in the Romantic-Era Anthology," Jeanne Britton, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Witnessing Slavery: Sterne's Novels and Sermons," Ramesh Mallipeddi, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York

Respondent: Ala A. Alryyes, Yale Univ.

For abstracts, write to ramesh.mallipeddi@hunter.cuny.edu.

Black Poetry, Reading (Re)Publics, and the Performative in Nineteenth-Century America

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Rafia Zafar, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "Frances E. W. Harper's 'Eliza Harris': A Verse Tableau," Alex Black, Cornell Univ.

2. "Constituting a Black Public: California Poetry in the Wake of the Civil War," Ivy Wilson, Northwestern Univ.

3. "'Lines in Memory': Black Elegies, National Figures, and the Christian Recorder," Eric S. Gardner, Saginaw Valley State Univ.

Institutional Affections

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Laura Fisher, New York Univ.

1. "Black Church Networks, Folk Sermons, Nonce Fellowship," Travis M. Foster, Coll. of Wooster

2. "Settlements, Girls' Clubs, and the Discourse of Cross-Class Friendship," Laura Fisher

3. "Communing in the Library," Gillian D. Silverman, Univ. of Colorado, Denver

Respondent: Ivy Schweitzer, Dartmouth Coll.

Representations of Muslim Male Sexuality in Early Modern English Literature

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: William Reginald Rampone, South Carolina State Univ.

1. "The Sultan's Seraglio: Islamic Masculinity on the English Stage," Ambereen Dadabhoy, Harvey Mudd Coll.

2. "Othello's 'Barbary Horse' and Henry VIII's Conscience: The Sexual Transgressions of Two Princes," Cristina Serverius, Brown Univ.

The Predicament of Success: Recent Literary Representations by and of "the New Elite"

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Andrew Hoberek, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

1. "'The Next Greatest Generation': Colson Whitehead, Michael Thomas, and the Postracial 'Dream Deferred,'" Monica L. Miller, Barnard Coll.

2. "The Lost Manuscript: Asian American Literature and Changing Expectations," Min Hyoung Song, Boston Coll.

3. "The Last (White) Man: Jonathan Franzen's Freedom and the Role of the White Liberal Male," Kathryn Knapp, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs

For abstracts, write to kathy.knapp@uconn.edu.

The French in the Americas

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth-Century French Literature and the Division on American Literature to 1800. Presiding: Mary McAlpin, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

1. "New French Sympathy: Quentin Stockwell's Ardent Frenchmen," Laura Laffrado, Western Washington Univ.

2. "America in the French Imagination: The French Settlers of Asylum, Pennsylvania, and Their Perceptions of 1790s America," Catherine Spaeth, Saint Catherine Univ.

3. "Lafitau's Indigenous Religions," Mary Helen McMurran, Univ. of Western Ontario

4. "'Lieu de mémoires,' from Versailles to the Verrazano Narrows: Location and Identity in the Mémoires de la marquise de La Tour du Pin," Julia Luisa Abramson, Univ. of Oklahoma

What Is the Early Modern?

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature and the Division on Seventeenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Marcus Keller, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Ellen McClure, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

Speakers: Hall Bjornstad, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Rivi Handler-Spitz, Middlebury Coll.; Kathleen P. Long, Cornell Univ.; Larry F. Norman, Univ. of Chicago; Jeffrey N. Peters, Univ. of Kentucky; Dora E. Polachek, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

Is it possible to identify certain epistemic, aesthetic, or ethical categories that can serve to characterize literary works across century borders? Does the idea of the early modern provide a useful frame for scholars today? This roundtable devoted to the question “What is the early modern?” invites scholars to reflect on their research and teaching practices.

Ending the Edition

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing. Presiding: Carol DeBoer-Langworthy, Brown Univ.

1. "Mary Moody Emerson's Almanacks: Digital Editions and Imagined Endings," Noelle A. Baker, Neenah, WI

2. "Closing the Book on a Multigenerational Edition: Harvard's The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson," Ronald A. Bosco, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Joel Myerson, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

3. "'Letting Go': The Final Volumes of the Cambridge Fitzgerald Edition," James L. W. West III, Penn State Univ., University Park

Pinter in Seattle: A Creative Conversation with Frank Corrado and Harry Burton

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Harold Pinter Society. Presiding: Susan Hollis Merritt, Pinter Review

Speakers: Harry Burton, London, England; Frank Corrado, ACT: A Contemporary Theatre

Frank Corrado is an actor and the founding curator of Pinter Fortnightly, a series of readings of plays by the Nobel laureate Harold Pinter produced at Seattle's ACT: A Contemporary Theatre. Harry Burton is a London-based actor and director and was Pinter's longtime associate and friend, chosen by Pinter to edit his letters. They will explore and illustrate the challenges of performing Pinter's plays on stage, referring to actors' workshops documented in Burton's film Working with Pinter.

For related information, visit www.pintersociety.org after 5 Nov.

Milton and Religion

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the Milton Society of America and the Division on Literature and Religion. Presiding: Stephen M. Fallon, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "Milton's Views on Heresy," Tobias B. Gregory, Catholic Univ. of America

2. "Socinianism and Paradise Regained," Dustin Stewart, Univ. of Texas, Austin

3. "Milton's 'Fundamentalist' Poem Rescripted," Elizabeth Mary Sauer, Brock Univ.

Tragedy, Translation, and Theory: A Tribute to the Work of Thomas J. McCall

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 616, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Cathy Caruth, Cornell Univ.

1. "Paradoxon: On the Sublimity of Tragedy (Hölderlin among Others)," Ian Grant Balfour, York Univ., Keele

2. "Tragedy and Translation: The Case of the Missing Body," Cathy Caruth

3. "The Curse of Mythic Memory: Benjamin, Sebald, and the Ornaments of Forgetting," David S. Ferris, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

Ethnographic Encounters: Jewish American and Italian American Graphic Narratives

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Italian American Literature and the Discussion Group on Jewish American Literature. Presiding: JoAnne Ruvoli, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "From Caricature to Complexity: Drawing the Relationship between Italians and Jews in America," Jennifer Glaser, Univ. of Cincinnati

2. "America Makes Strange Jews: Jewish Identity and Pulp Masculinity in Howard Chaykin's Dominic Fortune," Brannon Costello, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

Respondent: Miriam Jaffe-Foger, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

For abstracts, visit www.aihaweb.org/italianamericanliterature.htm after 24 Dec.

Coding Culture: Humanities Responses to Biological Theories of Culture

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Peter McIsaac, York Univ., Keele

1. "Aesthetics of Coding: Art, Science, and Human Nature," Carsten Strathausen, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

2. "Symbolic Codes and the Problem of Meaning," David Pan, Univ. of California, Irvine

3. "Codes of Behavior: Incest Avoidance as Aversion, Taboo, and Ethics," Stefani Engelstein, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

For abstracts, write to dtpan@uci.edu.

The Philosophical Example

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Bruce W. Robbins, Columbia Univ.

1. "The Philosophical Example and the Literary Example," Frances Ferguson, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

2. "Coherent Appraisals? On Onora O'Neill," Helen Small, Univ. of Oxford, Pembroke Coll.

3. "The Margins of Utility," Jesse Rosenthal, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

Medium, Mediation, and Contemporary Avant-Garde Poetics

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Brian M. Reed, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Blank Pages: Medium as Social Event," Craig Douglas Dworkin, Univ. of Utah

2. "Intermediation and Self-Fashioning in Charles Bernstein's #4 a Portrait of One Being in Family Living," Brian M. Reed

3. "Crystallographies: The Virtualities of Deleuze and Bök," Joseph A. Milutis, Univ. of Washington, Bothell

For abstracts, visit faculty.washington.edu/bmreed/.

Francophone Studies and Ecocriticism

Saturday, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Francophone Literatures and Cultures. Presiding: Valérie K. Orlando, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Jean-Marie Teno's Autobiographical Ecocriticism," Anjali Prabhu, Wellesley Coll.

2. "Chocolat noir et café amer: Les ravages de la monoculture du café et du cacao dans la littérature camerounaise de langue française," Marie Chantale Mofin Noussi, Univ. of New Mexico

3. "Geo-poetics, Eco-poetics, and the Beach in Francophone Island Literature," Namrata Poddar, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

4. "From the Malinche to Terra Mater: Le Clézio's Colonial and Postcolonial Portraits of Women in Nature," Suzanne Lalonde, Univ. of Texas, Brownsville

Beyond Borders: Redefining the Nation in Twenty-First-Century Travel Texts

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Travel Literature. Presiding: Jennifer Hayward, Coll. of Wooster

1. "Redefining France from the Border: (Im)Migration, Women, and National Identity in Contemporary French Cinema," Marie-Pierre Caquot Baggett, South Dakota State Univ.

2. "Raja Shehadeh's Hollow Land: Roaming the Limits of Representation," Charlotta Salmi, Univ. of Oxford

3. "'El ojo patrio' (Motherland's Eye): Travel Literature and Nationhood in Twenty-First-Century Argentina," Angel T. Tuninetti, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

Materialism(s)

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century. Presiding: Sara Guyer, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "Material Excursions," Brian McGrath, Clemson Univ.

2. "The Matter of Fictitious Capital," Anna Kornbluh, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

3. "Literary Immanence," Mario Ortiz-Robles, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Time in Old Norse–Icelandic Literature

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Old Norse Language and Literature. Presiding: Joseph C. Harris, Harvard Univ.

1. "Time and Nine Giant Women: Apocalypse and Chronology in Völuspá," Jes Battis, Univ. of Regina

2. "Thor's Nine Paces: Völuspá Stanza 56," Thomas D. Hill, Cornell Univ.

3. "An Old Problem in a New Time Signature: Snorri's Revision of Temporality in Völuspá," Sarah M. Anderson, Princeton Univ.

Respondent: Richard L. Harris, Univ. of Saskatchewan

Theater, Politics, and Criticism in and through Antonio Gramsci's Writings

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Monica Facchini, Brown Univ.; Stefano Selenu, Cornell Univ.

1. "Sul concetto di dramma in Gramsci: Teatro, intellettuali, conflitti," Stefano Selenu

2. "Sei personaggi in cerca d'autore: L'attore-intellettuale come metonimia della 'crisi organica,'" Yuri Brunello, Univ. of Rome

3. "Redefining Gramsci: The Use of Gramsci in Dario Fo's Political Discourse," Andrea Scapolo, Duke Univ.

Why Comics Are and Are Not Picture Books

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Children's Literature and the Discussion Group on Comics and Graphic Narratives. Presiding: Charles Hatfield, California State Univ., Northridge; Craig Svonkin, Metropolitan State Coll. of Denver

1. "Picture Book Guy Looks at Comics: Structural Differences in Two Kinds of Visual Narrative," Perry Nodelman, Univ. of Winnipeg

2. "Not Genres but Modes of Graphic Narrative: Comics and Picture Books," Philip Nel, Kansas State Univ.

3. "Graphic Novels' Assault upon the Republic of Reading," Michael Joseph, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

4. "The Panel as Page and the Page as Panel: Uncle Shelby and the Case of the Twin ABZ Books," Joseph Terry Thomas, Jr., San Diego State Univ.

Child Soldiers in African Literature and Film: Confronting Our Assumptions

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Boren, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on African Literatures. Presiding: Janice S. Spleth, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

1. "The Limits of Restitutive Justice: Abani’s Song for Night and Aduaka’s Ezra," Kenneth Harrow, Michigan State Univ.

2. "Between Trauma and Entertainment: Child Soldiers as Cultural Critics," Stephen L. Bishop, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

3. "Victims or Victimizers? Youth and Sexuality in Child Soldier Narratives," Kaelyn Kaoma, Univ. of Toronto

Digital Humanities versus New Media

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session

1. "Everything Old Is New Again: The Digital Past and the Humanistic Future," Alison Byerly, Middlebury Coll.

2. "As Study or as Paradigm? Humanities and the Uptake of Emerging Technologies," Andrew Pilsch, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Digital Tunnel Vision: Defining a Rhetorical Situation," David Robert Gruber, North Carolina State Univ.

4. "Digital Humanities Authorship as the Object of New Media Studies," Victoria E. Szabo, Duke Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.duke.edu/~ves4/mla2012.

Reception for Patricia Yaeger Arranged by the PMLA Editorial Board

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Princessa Ballroom, Grand Hyatt, 721 Pine St.,

Members of the PMLA Editorial Board and Advisory Committee will join friends and colleagues of Patricia Yaeger to honor her term as editor of PMLA (2006–11).

Perversion and Revolution

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Virginia L. Blum, Univ. of Kentucky

1. "Politics and Risk: From Pervert to Partisan," Steven L. Miller, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

2. "Convulsive Beauty in the Age of New Media," Bernadette Wegenstein, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

3. "Will the Real Subversive Please Stand Up? Psychoanalysis and Contestatory Politics," William E. Egginton, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

A Creative Conversation with Charles Johnson

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 6A, WSCC

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director. Presiding: Linda F. Selzer, Penn State Univ., University Park

Speaker: Charles Johnson, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

A National Book Award winner, MacArthur fellow, and recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, Charles Johnson will speak with Linda Selzer on topics ranging from philosophical fiction to Buddhism to life as a Seattle resident. The conversation will be interspersed with short readings from Johnson’s work. The author will then respond to audience questions.

Early Modern Possible Worlds

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Carla Mazzio, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "Three Takes on Possibility: Shakespeare, Leibniz, Kierkegaard," Simon Palfrey, Univ. of Oxford, Brasenose Coll.

2. "'As Might Best Be': Poetics of Possibility in The Faerie Queene," Debapriya Sarkar, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "A Possible World in Math and Poetry: Descartes's Le Monde," Jacqueline D. Wernimont, Scripps Coll.

For abstracts, visit earlymodernpossibleworlds.wordpress.com.

You Will Know Them by Their Shoes: Footwear in the Cultural Production of the Early Modern Hispanic

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: John Beusterien, Texas Tech Univ.

1. "The Balcony of the Chapín; or, The Vain Architecture of Shoes in Early Modern Spain," María M. Carrión, Emory Univ.

2. "Lección de llevar chapines: Gender Performance and Footwear in Guillén de Castro's La fuerza de la costumbre," Harry Vélez-Quiñones, Univ. of Puget Sound

3. "Escalando peldaños: Feminine Shoes and Social Mobility in Colonial Peru," Sara Vicuna Guengerich, Texas Tech Univ.

4. "Virillas de chapines: Accessorizing the Nation in Seventeenth-Century Spain," Noelia Sol Cirnigliaro, Dartmouth Coll.

For abstracts, write to noelia.cirnigliaro@dartmouth.edu after 1 Dec.

Nineteenth-Century American Sentiment, Radical or Otherwise

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Cindy Weinstein, California Inst. of Tech.

1. "'Can Fear of Fire Make Me Love?': Nineteenth-Century Apocalyptic Sentimentalism," Kevin Pelletier, Univ. of Richmond

2. "'Every Woman . . . Should Raise Her Voice': Rethinking White Women's Activism in William Wells Brown's Clotel," Leslie Petty, Rhodes Coll.

3. "Deemphasizing Sentimentality in Nineteenth-Century American Culture," April Davidauskis, Univ. of Southern California

Respondent: Richard A. Garner, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

For abstracts, visit richardagarner.com/mla-2012-radical-sentiment-panel.

Revising Neoclassicism

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Rivka Swenson, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

1. "Horatian Imitation and the Problem of Christian Coherence: Young's Love of Fame: The Universal Passion as an Experiment in Harnessing Vanity (Pride) for the Greater Good," Anna Foy, Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "Making the Revolutionary Hero: British Representations of Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius in the 1790s," Anna Deters, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

3. "'Bearing Their Conquered Household Gods': Unsettling the Relation between Epic and Neoclassicism," Charlotte Sacks Sussman, Duke Univ.

4. "Alexander Pope's Innovations in Literary Orientalism," Matthew Reilly, Univ. of Texas, Austin

Respondent: Catherine Elizabeth Ingrassia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

William Carlos Williams's A Voyage to Pagany and Pagany (1930–33)

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the William Carlos Williams Society. Presiding: Jill Richards, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "William Carlos Williams, the Transatlantic Avant-Garde, and the Voyage to Pagany," Eric White, Oxford Brookes Univ.

2. "Pagany, Pagany, and Poema Adversus Paganos: Williams's Voyage and Kenneth Burke's Toward a Better Life," Miriam Marty Clark, Auburn Univ., Auburn

3. "Imagining a Pagus: Pagany and Thirties Transformation of America," Michael A. Rozendal, Univ. of San Francisco

For abstracts, visit wcwsociety.wordpress.com/.

Answering to Debt: Benjamin, Schuld, and Literature

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Jonathan S. Luftig, Morgan State Univ.

1. "Being in Debt and the Gift of Literature in De Quincey and Benjamin," Jonathan S. Luftig

2. "A Shocking Debt: Ernst Bloch on Déjà Vu, Benjamin, and 'All That Has Been Left Behind,'" Helmut W. Illbruck, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

3. "All Bets Are Off: Narrative Feedback and the Submersion of Literary Indebtedness," Henry S. Sussman, Yale Univ.

Forms and Effects: Linguistic Approaches to the Teaching of Literature

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Linguistic Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Jean-Jacques Thomas, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "Stylistics in an Advanced English as a Second Language Course," Douglas Adamson, Univ. of Arizona

2. "The Grammar of Poetry, the Poetry of Grammar," Michael E. Huffmaster, Marlboro Coll.

3. "Functional Linguistics and the Teaching of Literature," Birgitta Svensson, Halmstad Univ.

4. "Epistemological Uncertainty in Heart of Darkness and The Great Gatsby: A Comparative Concordance Analysis of Verbs of Cognition and Their Negation," Robert Troyer, Western Oregon Univ.

For papers, write to kcss@stanford.edu after 20 Nov.

Alternative Ancestries

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Disability Studies. Presiding: David Mitchell, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

1. "The Crip's Speech," Robert McRuer, George Washington Univ.

2. "Beasts of Burden: Animals and Disability," Sunaura Taylor, Oakland, CA

3. "The Capacities of Incapacity: Richard Powers's The Echo-Maker and Contemporary Novels of Embodiment," David Mitchell

4. "Mirror Fragments," Riva Lehrer, School of the Art Inst. of Chicago

#alt-ac: The Future of "Alternative Academic" Careers

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 3B, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Programs. Presiding: Bethany Nowviskie, Univ. of Virginia

Speakers: Donald Brinkman, Microsoft Research; Neil Fraistat, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Robert Gibbs, Univ. of Toronto; Charles Henry, Council on Library and Information Resources; Bethany Nowviskie; Jason C. Rhody, National Endowment for the Humanities; Elliott Shore, Bryn Mawr Coll.

In increasing numbers, scholars are pursuing careers as "alternative academics"--embracing hybrid and non-tenure-track positions in libraries, presses, humanities and cultural heritage organizations, and digital labs and centers. Speakers represent organizations helping to craft alternatives to the traditional academic career. Related session: "#alt-ac: Alternative Paths, Pitfalls, and Jobs in the Digital Humanities" (539).

Language, Literature, Learning: New Research in Celtic Studies

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 306, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Celtic Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Richard Murphy, Univ. of South Carolina, Spartanburg

1. "Learning and Literacy in Twelfth-Century Ireland: The Irish Odyssey between Literacy and Orality," Barbara Lisa Hillers, Harvard Univ.

2. "Revolting Gaelic: Rebellious Scottish Codes in Scott and Stevenson," Anna Faktorovich, Edinboro Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Blindness and Poetic Vision in Eighteenth-Century Irish Poetry," Sarah Elizabeth McKibben, Univ. of Notre Dame

4. "The Language of Diplomacy and Conquest in Eleventh-Century Wales," Sarah Zeiser, Harvard Univ.

Occitan Panel on Poetry and Knowledge

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Provençal Language and Literature. Presiding: Valerie Wilhite, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Forgetting the Troubadours in Richard de Fournival's Bestiaire d'amour," Eliza Zingesser, Princeton Univ.

2. "The 'Homs Prims' in the Razos de Trobar: A Paradigm of Poetic Knowledge," Hartley Miller, Princeton Univ.

3. "'Messatges Vai!': Verse as a Means of Communication in Old Occitan Poetry," Courtney Wells, Wartburg Coll.

For abstracts, visit www.users.muohio.edu/wilhitvm/ocpoetryknowledge/index.htm.

Twentieth-Century American Literature and the New Formalism

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Robert Dale Parker, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Suzan-Lori Parks: Re-Forming History," Letitia Ileana Guran, Chapel Hill, NC

2. "Form and Anachronism; or, Cyberspace," Brian Geoffrey McHale, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "What Form Knows: Notes toward a Late Formalism," Anton Vander Zee, Coll. of Charleston

Poe and Hawthorne: Shades of the Gothic

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 308, WSCC

Program arranged by the Poe Studies Association and the Nathaniel Hawthorne Society. Presiding: Samuel Chase Coale, Wheaton Coll., MA

1. "There's No Text like Home: Poe, Hawthorne, and the Internalization of Quest Romance," Price McMurray, Texas Wesleyan Univ.

2. "Spirits of Place: Hawthorne, Poe, and the Gothic Genius Loci," Robert Tally, Texas State Univ.

3. "Poe, Hawthorne, and the Gothic Horror of Antebellum Print Culture," Lesley Ginsberg, Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs

For abstracts, visit www2.lv.psu.edu/PSA/conferences.html.

Lord Byron: Poetry in Manuscript, Poetry in Print

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Byron Society of America. Presiding: Gary R. Dyer, Cleveland State Univ.

1. "Indeterminacy and Method: Editing Byron's Accidentals," Alice J. Levine, Hofstra Univ.

2. "Byron's Social Readers and the Limits of Manuscript," Michelle Nancy Levy, Simon Fraser Univ.

3. "Byron's Hand," Gary R. Dyer

Fifty Years after the Lady Chatterley Trial: Lawrence and Censorship, Pornography, Obscenity

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the D. H. Lawrence Society of North America. Presiding: Holly A. Laird, Univ. of Tulsa

1. "Puritanical Writing: Testing the Boundaries of Morality in Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover and Phillip Roth's Sabbath's Theater," Terry A. Michels, Happy Camp, CA

2. "Aren't We Guilty Too? The Censorship of D. H. Lawrence in the Ivory Tower," Erin Johns Speese, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown

3. "The Censorship of Lady Chatterley's Lover and Sexual Repression: Ian McEwan's Atonement and On Chesil Beach," Earl G. Ingersoll, State Univ. of New York, Brockport

Language, Literature, Learning: Ezra Pound as Teacher, Teaching Ezra Pound

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Ezra Pound Society. Presiding: Ira Nadel, Univ. of British Columbia

1. "Ezra Pound's Role in John Berryman's Modernist Pedagogy," Amanda Golden, Emory Univ.

2. "Purging Modernism: Pound, Céline, and the Postwar Literary Canon," Lise Jaillant, Univ. of British Columbia

3. "Pound's Sea as Pedagogy and Paideuma," James McDougall, American Univ. of Kuwait

4. "Pound's Noh Pedagogies: Lessons on the Transnational Image," Carrie J. Preston, Boston Univ.

For abstracts, write to demetres@unb.ca.

Innovative Pedagogy and Research in Technical Communication

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 615, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: William Klein, Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis

1. "The New Normal of Public Health Research by Technical Communication Professionals," Thomas Barker, Texas Tech Univ.

2. "Teaching the New Paradigm: Social Media inside and outside the Classroom," William Magrino, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Peter B. Sorrell, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "Technical and Rhetorical Communication through DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Digital Video," Crystal VanKooten, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

For abstracts, write to bill_klein@umsl.edu.

Epic Sex: Power, Desire, and Love in the Medieval Epic

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch. Presiding: Jason D. Jacobs, Roger Williams Univ.

1. "The Effect of Parental Loss on Feminine Gender Development in the Medieval Spanish Epic," Brys Stafford, Univ. of Toronto

2. "Trouble with Authority: Versions of a Stubborn Wife in the Huon d'Auvergne Ms. Tradition," Stephen Patrick McCormick, Univ. of Oregon

3. "When a Feudal Warlord Goes Crazy for Love: An Interpretive Reading through Orlando's Literary Development," Marco Prina, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Respondent: Jason D. Jacobs

Modern East Asian Literature, World Literature

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures after 1900. Presiding: Melek Ortabasi, Simon Fraser Univ.

1. "Feng Zhi's Creative Integration of Rilke's Modernist Poetics," Geraldine Fiss, Univ. of Southern California

2. "The False Start of Modern Japanese Literature in English Translation," Samuel Malissa, Yale Univ.

3. "Korean Literature Translation Institutes and the Rebranding of Korean Culture," Jennifer Wang Medina, Columbia Univ.

4. "Lyricism, Political Pedagogy, and the Literary Type: Guo Moruo and the Problem of the Historical Tragedy," Pu Wang, New York Univ.

Text:Image Visual Studies in the English Major

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Society for Textual Scholarship. Presiding: Meg Roland, Marylhurst Univ.

1. "Aesthetic Literacy and Interdisciplinary Vocabularies," M. Stephanie Murray, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

2. "Curricular Challenges, Pedagogical Opportunities: Charting Modernism across Departmental Boundaries," David M. Ball, Dickinson Coll.; Elizabeth Lee, Dickinson Coll.

3. "Text:Image Visual Studies in the English Department," Perrin Maurine Kerns, Marylhurst Univ.

4. "Mapping the Antebellum Culture of Reprinting," Ryan Cordell, Saint Norbert Coll.

For abstracts, write to mroland@marylhurst.edu.

Baroque Drama

Saturday, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Literature. Presiding: Susanne Lindgren Wofford, New York Univ.

1. "The Experience of Phenomena in Dramatic Poetry of the Late Sixteenth Century: Tasso, Guarini, Marino," Kristin Phillips-Court, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

2. "Garnier's Bradamante (1582): A Baroque Drama in Classical Garb," Elizabeth Chesney Zegura, Univ. of Arizona

3. "Lope de Vega's El Brasil restituido as a Mirror of Religious, Ethnic, and Imperial Conflicts in the Age of the Baroque," Lúcia Helena Santiago Costigan, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Cash Bar, Business Meeting, and Dinner Arranged by the Joseph Conrad Society of America

Saturday, Cash bar at 6:00 p.m., business meeting at 6:30 p.m., and dinner at 7:00 p.m., Blueacre Seafood

For reservations, write to gogwilt@fordham.edu by 27 Dec.

Cash Bar and Dinner Arranged by the Milton Society of America

Saturday, Cash bar at 6:00 p.m. and dinner at 7:15 p.m., Paris Ballroom, Hotel Monaco

For reservations, contact Jameela Lares by 15 Dec.

Cash Bar and Dinner Arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Drama

Saturday, Cash bar at 6:30 p.m. and dinner at 7:00 p.m., Spinasse, 1531 14th Ave.

For reservations, e-mail Barbara Simerka (simerkabarbara@gmail.com) and send $48 to her (Dept. of HLL, 243 Keily Hall, Queens Coll., Flushing, NY 11367) by 10 Dec.

MLA Awards Ceremony

Saturday, 6:45 p.m., Metropolitan A, Sheraton

Presiding: Russell A. Berman, Stanford Univ., MLA President

Speakers: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park; Rosemary G. Feal; Rosemary G. Feal; Michael Bérubé; Russell A. Berman; Fredric Jameson

1. Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park, MLA First Vice President, will present the William Riley Parker Prize, James Russell Lowell Prize, MLA Prize for a First Book, Kenneth W. Mildenberger Prize, Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize, MLA Prize for Independent Scholars, Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize, Morton N. Cohen Award, MLA Prize for a Distinguished Scholarly Edition, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French and Francophone Studies, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Slavic Languages and Literatures, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for a Translation of a Scholarly Study of Literature, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies, Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies, Lois Roth Award, William Sanders Scarborough Prize, MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies.

2. Rosemary G. Feal, MLA, will present the MLA International Bibliography Fellowship Awards.

3. Rosemary G. Feal will announce the recipients of the seal of approval from the Committee on Scholarly Editions.

4. Michael Bérubé will announce the recipients of the ADE Francis Andrew March Award and the ADFL Award for Distinguished Service to the Profession.

5. Russell A. Berman will present the MLA Award for Lifetime Scholarly Achievement to Fredric Jameson, Duke Univ.

6. Remarks by Fredric Jameson

Reception immediately following.

Reception Arranged by the Graduate Program in Spanish and Portuguese at Northwestern University

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Old English Language and Literature

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 201, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the University of Virginia English Department

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 204, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the English Departments at the University of Missouri and the University of Nebraska

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 213, WSCC

Reception Arranged by the University of Michigan English Department

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 206, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Minnesota Review

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand A, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the Yale University Department of French

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Performing Wagner: A Creative Conversation

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand D, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Opera as a Literary and Dramatic Form. Presiding: Mary Ann Smart, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Speakers: William Germano, Cooper Union; Speight Jenkins, Seattle Opera; Hans Rudolf Vaget, Smith Coll.

Why Wagner now? What new ideas or new theatrical visions are driving the surge in productions of Wagner's Ring cycle? The conversation will touch on the practical challenges of staging Wagner, the impact of digital technology, and the ways productions can inflect the political and philosophical meanings of the operas.

Cash Bar Arranged by the German Department at the University of California, Irvine

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand C, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Black American Literature and Culture

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 211, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on American Literature to 1800

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 203, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the College of Humanities at the University of Arizona

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand B, Sheraton

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on Chicana and Chicano Literature

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 212, WSCC

Cash Bar Arranged by the Division on the Victorian Period and the Division on the English Romantic Period

Saturday, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 214, WSCC

Comics, Bande Dessinée, Manga: For a Comparative Approach to the Study of Comics

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Catherine Labio, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

1. "'Aint I de Maine Guy in Dis Parade?': Sympathetic Immigrant Narratives and the Transnational Worker in Early American Comic Strips," Michael T. R. Demson, Sam Houston State Univ.

2. "Academic Fandom and the Other-ed Side in American Comic Book Studies," Shawna Kidman, Univ. of Southern California

3. "Masochistic Contracts, Bishōnen, and the Rejection of Futurity: How to Read Manga like a Victorian Woman," Anna Maria Jones, Univ. of Central Florida

Henry James and/as Cultural Capital

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Henry James Society. Presiding: Donatella Izzo, Università di Napoli "l'Orientale"

1. "Et in Arcadia Ego: Money, Failure, and the Vicissitudes of Cultural Capital in Henry James's 'Brooksmith' and The Spoils of Poynton," Joseph A. Dimuro, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

2. "Capital Destruction: Art and the Crowd in James's The Princess Casamassima," Matthew Levay, Harvard Univ.

3. "What Would James Do? Contemporary Adaptations of Henry James," John Carlos Rowe, Univ. of Southern California

For abstracts, visit mockingbird.creighton.edu/english/HJS/MLAPapersArchive.html after 15 Dec.

Academically Adrift?

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Laura Rosenthal, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Speakers: Sarah Webster Goodwin, Skidmore Coll.; Donna Heiland, Teagle Foundation; Elizabeth Bergmann Loizeaux, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Josipa Roksa, Univ. of Virginia

Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa's Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses claims that college students are making limited gains in crucial areas, studying less than previous generations, and being insufficiently challenged. Students majoring in humanities, however, experienced some of the highest gains. This roundtable opens up a discussion of how we might rethink institutional practices and strategies for advocacy.

For information about the book under discussion, visit highered.ssrc.org/?page_id=28.

Zoopolitics

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Alastair Hunt, Portland State Univ.

1. "Animal Tracts," Mario Ortiz-Robles, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

2. "Animals in Revolution," Ron Broglio, Arizona State Univ.

3. "Belabored Life: Animals and the Work of Feeling," Nicole Shukin, Univ. of Victoria

Respondent: Jami Weinstein, Linköping Univ.

Modern Echoes of Platonic Poetics

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: David Schur, Brooklyn Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "'In vino narratus': Authorship and Fictionality in Kierkegaard's Symposium," Lori H. Yamato, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

2. "Socratic Aporia in Conrad's Dialectical Fiction: Reanimating a Classical Quarrel," Debra Romanick Baldwin, Univ. of Dallas

3. "Plato and the Modern Acoustics of Torture," Ramona A. Naddaff, Univ. of California, Berkeley

For abstracts, write to dbaldwin@udallas.edu.

Queer Anachronisms and the Question of History

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 303, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Kathryn Bond Stockton, Univ. of Utah

1. "Anachronizing the Penitentiary, Queering History," Kadji Amin, Columbia Coll., IL

2. "Spinster Time ('U Can't Touch This')," Heather K. Love, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Anachronicles; or, Steampunking Queer Theory," Elizabeth Freeman, Univ. of California, Davis

Not What We Thought: Representations of the Digital Everyday

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Mark Bresnan, New York Univ.

1. "Enter eBay: Representations of the Digital Everyday in Jonathan Lethem's Chronic City," Zara Dinnen, Univ. of London, Birkbeck Coll.

2. "The Work of Viral Video in the Age of Networked Transmission," Kimberly Knight, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

3. "@Margaret Atwood: Interactive Media and the Management of Literary Celebrity," Lorraine M. York, McMaster Univ.

Language in/as Living Organism: The New Genre of Geno-Poetry

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Susan Jennifer Vanderborg, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

1. "The Xenotext," Christian Bök, Univ. of Calgary

2. "Mutating Bodies: Reconstructing the Reader in Geno-Poetry," Susan Jennifer Vanderborg

3. "Expressed from Within: Geno-Poetry and the Gesture toward Immanence," Ming-Qian Ma, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

Gettin' Around: Transnational Jazz Literature

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 618, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jürgen E. Grandt, Gainesville State Coll., GA

1. "From Harlem to Paris: A Transatlantic Interpretation of James Baldwin's 'Sonny's Blues,'" Rashida Braggs, Williams Coll.

2. "Swinging Variety: Jazz in the Literature of the German Democratic Republic," Marc-Oliver Schuster, Univ. of Vienna

3. "The Transplanetary Nation Blues and the Abstract Truth," Aldon Lynn Nielsen, Penn State Univ., University Park

Respondent: DoVeanna Sherie Fulton Minor, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

For abstracts, write to jgrandt@gsc.edu.

Changes of Address: Letters and the Mid-Twentieth-Century American Lyric

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Luke Carson, Univ. of Victoria

1. "'Utilizey la poste arienne': Lyric Mail in Marianne Moore," Heather Cass White, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2. "Lorine Neidecker's Republic of Letters," Siobhan Phillips, Dickinson Coll.

3. "'In the Sound a Thought': Allusion and Source in Robert Lowell's Letters," Saskia Hamilton, Barnard Coll.

Geographies of Urban Female Labor in Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Mar Soria, Susquehanna Univ.

1. "Mid-Nineteenth-Century Geography of Urban Women's Work: Agyuals de Izco's María, la hija de un jornalero and La Marquesa de Bellaflor o el niño de la Inclusa," Rebecca Haidt, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

2. "'Ir por lana': Migración laboral femenina en un cuento de Pereda," Margot A. Versteeg, Univ. of Kansas

3. "A Castiza Commodity: The Salesgirl in Gómez de la Serna's La Nardo," Mar Soria

Technologies of the Real: Early Cinematic Naturalism in Norris, London, and Wharton

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Gina Marie Rossetti, Saint Xavier Univ.

1. "Taking Naturalism to the Moving Picture Show: Griffith, Norris, and Naturalist Film Style," Katherine Fusco, Vanderbilt Univ.

2. "Cinema and Transition in The Valley of the Moon," Owen Clayton, Univ. of Leeds

3. "The Sidewalks of New York: Edith Wharton's Slum Stories and Early Cinema," Donna M. Campbell, Washington State Univ., Pullman

For abstracts, visit http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/mla/mla2012.htm.

Foregrounding Backgrounds: Theorizing British Settings from 1772 to 1893

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 309, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Maria Su Wang, Biola Univ.

1. "Things Cohere in Diderot, Mackenzie, and Radcliffe," Miruna Stanica, George Mason Univ.

2. "Making Objects Safe for Subjects: Industrial Landscapes in Biography," Cara Murray, Univ. of Houston, Downtown

3. "Averages and Exceptions: Gissing's Statistical Realism," Maria Su Wang

Trauma and Tradition: Intertextuality, Storytelling, and Lyric Address in Post-9/11 Literature

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Moberley Luger, Univ.of British Columbia

1. "Gatsby's Ghost and the Melancholic National Past in Joseph O'Neill's Netherland," Katherine V. Snyder, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Collective Grieving from World War II Dresden to Post-9/11 New York in Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," Alissa Bourbonnais, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "Apostrophe and Grief in Poetry after 9/11," Moberley Luger

Pedagogy and Print Culture in the Sixties

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Loren D. Glass, Univ. of Iowa

1. "Midget Missiles and Penny Projectiles: The Christian Anticommunism Crusade and Anticommunist Education," Laura Gifford, George Fox Univ.

2. "Reading Revolution," Loren D. Glass

3. "Puppets and Politics at the Bookmobile Stop: Radically Reimagining Public Space, 1968–69," Derek Attig, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

4. "Serializing Social Movements: Periodicals and the Time of US Women’s Liberation," Agatha Beins, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

"Any Volunteers?": Graduate Student Service Work

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession. Presiding: Heather Steffen, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

Speakers: Maureen Gallagher, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst; Michelle A. Massé, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge; Svetlana Tyutina, Florida International Univ.; Mary Unger, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

The work graduate students do in service positions is crucial to the functioning of colleges, universities, and professional organizations, but it is rarely recognized or compensated and has yet to be analyzed as a kind of academic labor. How might we begin to examine critically the ways this work shapes graduate student experiences, universities, and the profession?

Horror

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Kate Flint, Univ. of Southern California

1. "The Horror Within: Domestic Dangers at the Fin de Siècle," Gretchen Braun, Furman Univ.

2. "Horror of Photography and the Photographer's Horror," Joanna Madloch, Montclair State Univ.

3. "Body Shock and the Traces of Trauma: Freud, War, and Surrealism," Michael Levenson, Univ. of Virginia

Boccaccio's Legacies

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Literature. Presiding: Ignacio E. Navarrete, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "Boccaccio and the Invention of Italian Literature," Martin G. Eisner, Duke Univ.

2. "The 'Celestina' and the Elegiac Legacy of Madonna Fiammeta," Filippo Andrei, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "Exemplary Historiography: Margaret of Anjou as 'De Casibus' Heroine," Kavita Mudan, Georgetown Univ.

Food and Culture: Food and Empire

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Todd Kontje, Univ. of California, San Diego

1. "Hard to Digest? Colonial Foodstuffs and Colonial Guilt in Imperial Germany (1871–1914)," Alyssa L. Howards, Wake Forest Univ.

2. "The Friend-Food Distinction: Reading Alexander von Humboldt's Image of Cannibalism," Kurt Buhanan, Univ. of California, Irvine

3. "'Der höchst mögliche Wohlgeschmack, oder das Schöne': The Fate of Taste in the Nineteenth Century," Leigh Ann Smith-Gary, Univ. of Chicago

Chaucer and Belief

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Chaucer. Presiding: Kathy M. Lavezzo, Univ. of Iowa

1. "'Withouten Moore Avys': Belief and National Identity in The Canterbury Tales," Susan M. Nakley, Saint Joseph's Coll., Long Island Campus

2. "Zombie Hagiography: Who Believes What about Whom in The Prioress's Tale," Daniel T. Kline, Univ. of Alaska, Anchorage

3. "Seeing as Believing: Religion, Magic, and Spectacle in The Canterbury Tales," Tara Williams, Oregon State Univ.

Respondent: Steven F. Kruger, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York

The Viatic Eighteenth Century

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Julia Luisa Abramson, Univ. of Oklahoma

1. "From Grand Tour to School Trips: Education by Travels in Eighteenth-Century France," Gabor Gelleri, National Univ. of Ireland, Galway

2. "'Sans être voyageur de profession': Jésuites missionaires et voyageurs au Levant," Adina Ruiu, Université de Montréal-EHESS

3. "À quoi bon voyager? Raconter la Nouvelle-France au dix-huitième siècle," Sébastien Côté, Carleton Univ.

For abstracts, write to jabramson@ou.edu after 1 Dec.

John Milton: A General Session

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Milton Society of America. Presiding: Mary Fenton, Western Carolina Univ.

1. "The Poetics of Uncertainty," Joseph Anthony Wittreich, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

2. "Areopagitica and the Limits of Pluralism," Ben LaBreche, Univ. of Mary Washington

3. "The Father's Word, the Daughter's Freedom: Mihaly Munkacsy's 'Blind Milton Dictating Paradise Lost to His Daughters,'" William A. Shullenberger, Sarah Lawrence Coll.

The Role of Translation in Foreign Language Departments

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the American Translators Association. Presiding: Alan Melby, Brigham Young Univ., UT

1. "The Role of a Translation Studies Center on a University Campus," Elizabeth Lowe, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

2. "The Importance of Humanities Plus, Including Translation, to Foreign Language Instruction," Daryl Hague, Brigham Young Univ., UT

3. "Literature in Translation, Literature on Translation," Carol S. Maier, Kent State Univ., Kent

Respondent: Catherine Porter, State Univ. of New York, Cortland

Surrealism in the 1940s

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of Dada and Surrealism. Presiding: Katharine Conley, Dartmouth Coll.

1. "The Great Hidden Inspirer," Michael Taylor, Dartmouth Coll.

2. "Remapping Surrealism: Lee Miller's Cartographies," Patricia Allmer, Manchester Metropolitan Univ.

3. "Surrealist Views, American Landscapes," Kent L. Dickson, California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona

"Continuous Voyage Orders": From Komagata Maru to the Aftermath of 9/11

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the South Asian Literary Association. Presiding: John Charles Hawley, Santa Clara Univ.

1. "Recovering the History of South Asian Immigration to the Pacific Northwest," Nalini Iyer, Seattle Univ.

2. "Post 9/11 Negotiations: Identity and Distortion in H. M. Naqvi's Home Boy," Mayuri Deka, Coll. of the Bahamas

3. "Asking the Hard Questions and Saying the Harsh Things: Indian Responses to Terror and 9/11," Harveen Sachdeva Mann, Loyola Univ., Chicago

4. "Reconstructing an Alternative Genealogy of South Asian Presence in Recent South Asian American Literature," Rajender Kaur, William Paterson Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.southasianliteraryassociation.org/.

Unemployment

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Sociological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Jonathan Flatley, Wayne State Univ.

1. "Employment Will Set You Free: Property, Precarity, and the Entrepreneurial Spirit," Dan Harvey, Univ. of Alberta

2. "Saturation and the Aesthetics of Dead Capital," Marija Cetinic, Univ. of Alberta

3. "Tramping toward Washington: Coxey’s Army and Dreiser’s Sister Carrie," Ryan Dillaha, Wayne State Univ.

New Approaches to Science and Romanticism

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Virginia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Stefan Hoeppner, Univ. of Freiburg

1. "Ancient Egypt, Sacred Science, and the Poetry of Erasmus Darwin," Marques Redd, Marquette Univ.

2. "Rethinking American Romanticism through Medical Science," Paul Gilmore, California State Univ., Long Beach

3. "Botanical Science, Enlightenment, and Romanticism in Chamisso's Views on Botany and the Plant Kingdom," Alexander E. Pichugin, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

Nature and Ecological Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Film

Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Edward Hood, Northern Arizona Univ.

1. "Visiones contrastantes de la naturaleza en el modernismo cubano," Stephen Clark, California State Univ., Channel Islands

2. "El mundo natural en la narrativa y el cine de Gabriel García Márquez," Edward Hood

3. "Globalización y análisis ecocrítico de la novelística de Luis Sepúlveda," Gloria Gálvez-Carlisle, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Respondent: Gene H. Bell-Villada, Williams Coll.

The Literary Archive in an Age of Quantification: Evidence, Method, Imagination

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Justine S. Murison, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Cause for Idealism? The Scientization of Literary Studies," Jared Hickman, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

2. "Can We Have Sex in the Archives?" Jordan Alexander Stein, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

3. "How to Build Tools That Foster the Kind of Brainstorming You Want," Ted Underwood, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Respondent: Justine S. Murison

Chinese Biopolitics, Global Aesthetics

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Andrea Sabine Bachner, Penn State Univ., University Park; Chien-hsin Tsai, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Yan Lianke's Discourses of Disability," Carlos Rojas, Duke Univ.

2. "Translating Corporeality: International Architecture, Chinese Biopolitics," Andrea Sabine Bachner

3. "Venom, Virus, and the Rise of New China," Chien-hsin Tsai

Respondent: Lingchei Letty Chen, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Disrupting the Pact: Autobiography in Translation

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Mary Bryden, Reading Univ.

1. "Manipulating the Autobiographical Pact: Juan Francisco Manzano's Autobiografía del esclavo poeta," Alexandra Gonzenbach, Univ. of Miami

2. "Stefan Zweig's Die Welt von Gestern in French, English, and Hebrew," Mark H. Gelber, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev

3. "Re-membering the Letter: Georges Perec's Memories of Childhood," Gizem Arslan, Cornell Univ.

Heroic Idiocy and the Search for a Modernist Ethics

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbia, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Todd Garth, United States Naval Acad.

1. "Henry James and the Value of Stupidity," Matthew Sussman, Harvard Univ.

2. "On Stupidity and the Aesthetic of the Nonlinear Ethic in Robert Musil," Genese E. Grill, Community Coll. of Vermont

3. "The Few, the Proud, the Deluded: Borges's Foolish Heroes," Todd Garth

For abstracts, write to garth@usna.edu.

Crossing into America: Continuities and Fresh Contexts in Immigrant Narratives

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sheila Marie Contreras, Michigan State Univ.

1. "Dancing into America in Tamil Film Songs," Subramanian Shankar, Univ. of Hawai'i, Mānoa

2. "At the Border of the Imagination: Figures of Arab American Immigrants," Salah D. Hassan, Michigan State Univ.

3. "Voices across Our America: Meditations on Latinoization, Citizenship, and Belonging," Louis Mendoza, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Subversive Epistemology in the Erotic Dialogues of the Renaissance

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Seneca, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Frederick Blumberg, Stanford Univ.

1. "How Not to Seduce a Virgin," Wendy Beth Hyman, Oberlin Coll.

2. "Educating Sophia: Erotic Pedagogy in Renaissance Dialogues," Jean-Claude Carron, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "Erotic Disposition: Episode and Permutation," Frederick Blumberg

Sound and Voice in the Creative Writing Classroom: Practice-Based Pedagogies

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 614, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Christopher Drew, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

1. "Avoiding Meaning: A Classroom Exercise to Improve Students' Homophonic Sensibilities," David Bartone, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

2. "Into the Trenches: Breaking the Student-Author Binary with 'Dulce et Decorum Est,'" David Yost, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

3. "Specificity of Dialogue: A Coke Is a Soda Is a Pop Is a Cola," Liane LeMaster, Georgia Perimeter Coll., North Campus

Debates in the Digital Humanities

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Alexander Reid, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "Whose Revolution? Toward a More Equitable Digital Humanities," Matthew K. Gold, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York

2. "Hacktivism and the Humanities: Programming Protest in the Era of the Digital University," Elizabeth Mathews Losh, Univ. of California, San Diego

3. "Twenty-First-Century Literacy: Searching the Story of Billy the Kid," Jeff Rice, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

4. "Why the Digital Humanities Needs Theory," Jentery Sayers, Univ. of Victoria

For abstracts and discussion, visit dhdebatesmla12.wordpress.com/.

Celestina, Lazarillo, Don Quixote, and the Emergence of the Modern Mind

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ballard, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Cynthia Ann Sloan, Portland State Univ.

1. "Celestina as Puppeteer of Her Own Mind," Julien Jacques Simon, Indiana Univ. East

2. "Lázaro de Tormes as Mind Reader," Howard Mancing, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

3. "Sancho's Developing Theory of Don Quixote's Mind," Isabel Jaén-Portillo, Portland State Univ.

For papers, write to jjsimon@indiana.edu after 15 Nov.

Beyond Tordesillas: Dialogues across the Luso-Hispanic Frontier

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Kirkland, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Richard A. Gordon, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

1. "Iberianism as Countermemory: Interrogating Luso-Hispanic Dualism," Robert Patrick Newcomb, Univ. of California, Davis

2. "Argentine and Brazilian Late Modernism, Pós-Modernismo, and the Conditions of Comparison," Sarah Ann Wells, Univ. of Iowa

3. "Luso-Hispanic Relations under Review: The Pan-Hispanic Ideas of Antonio Sardinha," Fernanda Suely Muller, Universidade de São Paulo

For papers, write to rpnewcomb@ucdavis.edu after 5 Dec.

Shakespeare and Hospitality

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 310, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Joseph Anthony Campana, Rice Univ.

1. "Environments of Hospitality in A Midsummer Night's Dream," Julia Reinhard Lupton, Univ. of California, Irvine

2. "Hospitable Justice in Shakespeare's Sonnets," Kevin Curran, Univ. of North Texas

3. "Hospitality and Aneconomic Community in Timon of Athens," James Kearney, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

For abstracts, visit www.thinkingwithshakespeare.org/index.php?id=1013 after 15 Dec.

Sentimentalism's Unread Stories of Slavery

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Sarah Mesle, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Superabundance and the Queerness of Human Property in the Novels of Susan Petigru King," Michael Paul Bibler, Univ. of Manchester

2. "Witnessing Violence: Slavery and the Sentiments of Cruelty in Ida May and Caste," Sarah Mesle

3. "Reparations for Slavery and Lydia Maria Child's Reconstruction of the Family," Jeffory Clymer, Univ. of Kentucky

Respondent: Dana D. Nelson, Vanderbilt Univ.

Constancy in Distress: Transnationalism and Transgression in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 619, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Paul D. Giles, Univ. of Sydney

1. "Unsettling the Domestic Novel," Nancy Armstrong, Duke Univ.; Leonard Tennenhouse, Duke Univ.

2. "Overconstancy: The Limits of Resistance in Scottish Antiunion Rhetoric, 1705–07," Toni Bowers, Univ. of Pennsylvania

3. "Resisting the Novel: Jane Barker's Love Intrigues and the Politics of Form," Nicola Parsons, Univ. of Sydney

Health Care Systems in Literature and Film

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Laura Squires, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Urban Healthcare in 1900: Robert Herrick's The Web of Life," Phillip J. Barrish, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "The Hazards of Boom Fiction: Paula Fox's and Jonathan Franzen's Health Care Debate," Mary Gabrielle Esteve, Concordia Univ., Sir George Williams Campus

3. "The Flawed Humanitarian: The Failures of Kinship and Global Aid in After the Wedding," Anat Rosenthal, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Ralph Ellison and Civil Rights

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 611, WSCC

A special session

1. "Strange Country: Ralph Ellison Abroad," George Blaustein, Univ. of Amsterdam

2. "Harlem to Rome and Back: Ralph Ellison's Photographs as Social Activism," Sara Marzioli, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Consuming the Cadillac: Ralph Ellison, Postwar Consumption, the Dozens, and Civil Rights Politics," Nathaniel Mills, California State Univ., Northridge

4. "The Remains of the Revolutionary Day: From the Drafts of Invisible Man to Three Days before the Shooting . . . ," Barbara Clare Foley, Rutgers Univ., Newark

For abstracts, write to bfoley@andromeda.rutgers.edu after 1 Jan.

The Poetry of 1968

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Nandini Ramesh Sankar, Cornell Univ.

1. "Lorine Niedecker 'after / the Bay of Pigs,'" Jim Cocola, Worcester Polytechnic Inst.

2. "Room to Rhyme: 1968 and the Revision of the Public Poem in Postwar Britain," Simon Kress, Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth

3. "The New York School of Poetry and the Late 1960s," Yasmine Shamma, Univ. of Oxford

4. "Clarity in the Sense of Silence: Intermedial Conflict in George Oppen's Of Being Numerous," Rajiv C. Krishnan, English and Foreign Languages Univ.

For abstracts, write to nandinirameshsankar@gmail.com.

Giving It Away: Sharing and the Future of Scholarly Communication

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. Presiding: Nicholas Birns, New School

"Giving It Away: Sharing and the Future of Scholarly Communication," Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA

Ruins and Catastrophes

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Latin American Literature from Independence to 1900. Presiding: Gwen Kirkpatrick, Georgetown Univ.

1. "Sobre una república en ruinas: Peregrinaciones de una paria de Flora Tristán y el rol de las rabonas en la Primera República Peruana," Vanesa Miseres, Univ. of Notre Dame

2. "Catastrophic Sexualities: Disaster and Social Mores in the Literature on Brazil's Great Drought (1877–79)," Mark D. Anderson, Univ. of Georgia

3. "Ruina colonial, deterioro republicano: El viaje a la sierra del Perú de José de la Riva Aguero," Enrique Cortez, Portland State Univ.

Respondent: Gabriela Nouzeilles, Princeton Univ.

Threshold of Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Van Kelly, Univ. of Kansas

1. "Le prix Goncourt as a Sign of the Times? Rouaud, Echenoz, Houellebecq," Pamela Antonia Genova, Univ. of Oklahoma

2. "Epoque/Eponge: Pierre Alféri and Dominique Fourcade across Centuries," James Michael Petterson, Wellesley Coll.

3. "Remnants of Tragedy," Philip Coulter Watts, Columbia Univ.

Western American Transgressions: Crossing Geographical and Literary Forms

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Western Literature Association. Presiding: Alexander J. Hunt, West Texas A&M Univ.

1. "Nervous Bodies and Unsettled Borders: Transgressive Citizenship in Edith Eaton's West," Jennifer S. Tuttle, Univ. of New England

2. "Heterotopia in Forming Identity: The American Southwest in Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop," Martha (Max) Jane Despain, United States Air Force Acad.

3. "'Reinvent America and the World': City Lights Bookstore, Literary Transgression, and the Cultivation of Subversive Space," Gioia Woods, Northern Arizona Univ.

4. "'If the Indians Won, It Probably Wouldn't Be a Western': Attacking the Horse Opera in Contemporary Native American and First Nations Writing," Johannes Fehrle, Univ. of British Columbia

Teaching Rabelais

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Andrea Marie Frisch, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Speakers: Elisabeth Hodges, Miami Univ., Oxford; Jan Miernowski, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Michael Randall, Brandeis Univ.; Cynthia Skenazi, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Elizabeth Chesney Zegura, Univ. of Arizona

Approaches to Rabelais's works, from close readings to broader questions related to teaching literary aesthetics, hermeneutics, humanism, politics, and gender. Brief presentations by speakers followed by informal discussion and debate.

Velocities of Ecocriticism

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Paul K. Saint-Amour, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Ecocriticism and Animation," Ursula K. Heise, Stanford Univ.

2. "Dawn of the Hyperobjects," Timothy Morton, Univ. of California, Davis

3. "Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor," Rob Nixon, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Respondent: Wai Chee Dimock, Yale Univ.

Medieval Drama and Performative Theology

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Middle English Language and Literature, Excluding Chaucer. Presiding: Eve Salisbury, Western Michigan Univ.

1. "Performing Christians Performing Jews," Sylvia Tomasch, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York

2. "'The Word Made Flesh': A Barfieldian Analysis of Ritual Creation in the York Cycle," Jefferey H. Taylor, Metropolitan State Coll. of Denver

3. "Performing Justice: Law and Theology in the York Plays," Emma E. Lipton, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

4. "'Be Ye Thus Trowing': Medieval Drama and Make-Believe," Garrett P. J. Epp, Univ. of Alberta

Ecocriticism and Literature for Young Readers

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 613, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Children's Literature. Presiding: Caroline E. Jones, Texas State Univ.

1. "'Mother Earth' and 'Earth Mothers': Consequences of Feminizing the Earth and Its Keepers in Children's Picture Books," Amy Dunham Strand, Aquinas Coll., MI

2. "Winnie-the-Conservationist: An Ecofeminist Reading of Tuck Everlasting," Peter Kunze, Florida State Univ.

3. "Ecological Repression and Return: An Ecocritical Approach to Bloor's Tangerine and Crusader," Beth Feagan, Longwood Univ.

4. "Reading the South: Teaching Adolescents to Identify with Regional Land," Julia Pond, Illinois State Univ.

Criticism and Crisis

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: William J. Maxwell, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "When Literature Mattered and Why," George B. Hutchinson, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "The Rift in Reading and the Classrooms of Edmund Wilson and Cleanth Brooks," Rachel S. Buurma, Swarthmore Coll.; Laura Heffernan, Univ. of North Florida

3. "How Long Does a Crisis Last?" Francis J. Donoghue, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Respondent: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park

Poe as a Critic, Critical Poe

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the Poe Studies Association. Presiding: Barbara Anne Cantalupo, Penn State Univ., Fogelsville

1. "An Omen of Better Days: Poe, the Messenger, and Pre-Confederate Southern Literary Nationalism," Coleman Hutchison, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "'Urged by Schelling': Schelling's Philosophy of Art and Poe's Critical and Fictional Practice," Sean Moreland, Univ. of Ottawa; Devin Z. Shaw, Univ. of Ottawa

3. "Perversions of Freedom in Poe and Hawthorne," Jonathan W. D. Murphy, Univ. of Western Ontario

For abstracts, visit www2.lv.psu.edu/PSA/conferences.html.

American Indian Theater

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Ryan Winn, Coll. of Menominee Nation, WI

1. "Pow-Wowing the Stage: Hanay Geiogamah's Subversive Comedy," John Wharton Lowe, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

2. "Survivance in Diane Glancy's The Woman Who Was a Red Deer Dressed for the Deer Dance," James K. Ruppert, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks

3. "The Indigenous Female Speaker: Monologue Form in Contemporary Native American Drama," Nicole Tabor, Moravian Coll.

4. "'Frybread Is a Fabricated Identifier': Colonization, Historical Trauma, and Healing in The Frybread Queen," Patrice E. M. Hollrah, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas

Staging a Woman's Life in Academia

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Age Studies and the Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages. Presiding: E. Ann Kaplan, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York

1. "Marking Time to Degree: Age Talk and the Grad-School Decade," Heather Steffen, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

2. "The Good-Enough Academic Mother at Mid-Career," Devoney Looser, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia

3. "The R (Retirement) Word and the D (Death) Word for Women of a Certain Age," Nan Bauer-Maglin, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

Philosophy and the Novel: The Case of Adorno

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Marxist Literary Group. Presiding: Eugenio Bolongaro, McGill Univ.

1. "The Question of the Novel and the Ethics of Narrative in Benjamin’s One Way Street and Adorno’s Minima Moralia," Eugenio Bolongaro

2. "Adorno, Beckett, and Subtraction of the Novel," Michael D'Arcy, Saint Francis Xavier Univ.

3. "Immanent Domain: Adorno’s Novel and Tom McCarthy’s Remainder," Daniel Stout, Univ. of Mississippi

Negotiating Globalization: Millennial Fantasies of Austria's New Political Geographies

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Modern Austrian Literature and Culture Association. Presiding: Imke Meyer, Bryn Mawr Coll.

1. "Filming Austria onto the Global Map: Liebeneiner's 1. April 2000 as a Politics of Memory for the Future," Katherine Arens, Univ. of Texas, Austin

2. "The Russians Are Coming: New Crimes, Old Fears, and Intercultural Alliances," Heike Henderson, Boise State Univ.

3. "Fantasies of Global Austria in Josef Winkler's Literary Carinthia," Carola Daffner, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale

For abstracts, write to hschreck@uvm.edu.

Dickensian Beginnings

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the Dickens Society. Presiding: Kate E. Brown, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

1. "The First Ray of Light: Introductions and Interpolations in The Pickwick Papers," Anna Clark, Columbia Univ.

2. "Beginning with the Middle and the Muddle," Karen Chase, Univ. of Virginia

3. "Delayed Beginnings and Arrested Developments: How to Jump-Start a Dickens Novel," Rebecca Rainof, Catholic Univ. of America

4. "Futurity and Beginnings: The Problem of Plot in Great Expectations," Rachel Bowser, Georgia Gwinnett Coll.

Human Rights Modes: Lament

Sunday, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Alexandra W. Schultheis, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

1. "The Complaint That Compels: Emotion as Interpretative Mediation," Eve Marie Wiederhold, George Mason Univ.

2. "Camp Delta, 2011: Testimonial, Literature, and the Possibility of Lament," Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg, Babson Coll.

3. "Atrocity and Memory," James Dawes, Macalester Coll.

Human Rights Rhetoric: Witness and Testify

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: Wendy Hesford, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

1. "The Risks and Limits of a Rhetorical Approach to Human Rights," Arabella Lyon, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York; Lester Olson, Univ. of Pittsburgh

2. "Industrial Labor's Mary Harris 'Mother' Jones and the Rhetorics of Display," Mari Boor Tonn, Univ. of Richmond

3. "Human Rights and Civil Rights: The Advocacy of African American Women Writers," Jacqueline Jones Royster, Georgia Inst. of Tech.

4. "Rights Language and HIV Treatment: Universal Care or Population Control?" Cindy Patton, Simon Fraser Univ.

For abstracts, write to hesford.1@osu.edu after 1 Dec.

Gertrude Stein and Music

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Lyrica Society for Word-Music Relations and the Association for the Study of Dada and Surrealism. Presiding: Jeff Dailey, Five Towns Coll.

1. "Sounding Stein's Texts by Using Digital Tools for Distant Listening," Tanya E. Clement, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

2. "Gertrude's Glee and Jazz Mislaid Jazz," Judith A. Roof, Rice Univ.

3. "'This Is How They Do Not Like It': Queer Abjection in Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson's Four Saints in Three Acts," Brandon Masterman, Univ. of Pittsburgh

4. "'Come to Paris Where You Can Be Looked After': Paul Bowles Remediates Gertrude Stein," Christopher Leslie, Polytechnic Inst. of New York Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.lyricasociety.org.

Human Rights Modes: Testimony

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Michael S. Galchinsky, Georgia State Univ.

1. "Witness/Testimony: Graphic Narrative as Témoignage in the Humanitarian Work of Médecins sans Frontières," Alexandra W. Schultheis, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro

2. "Creative Witnessing in Kibuye: Exploring Human Rights and the Genocide in Rwanda," Zoe Norridge, Univ. of York

3. "Testimony and the Future: Edwidge Danticat," Brian J. Norman, Loyola Coll.

For papers, visit www.michaelgalchinsky.net after 15 Dec.

Mark Twain: Editing and Editions

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Mark Twain Circle of America. Presiding: Tracy Wuster, Univ. of Texas, Austin

1. "Mark Twain's Autobiography: The Challenge of Editing a Dictated Text," Benjamin Griffin, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "First Cuts: The Serial Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the Century Magazine," Rachel Ihara, Kingsborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

3. "BLEEP: Huck Finn, Censorship, and the Institution of Literature," Robert Tally, Texas State Univ., San Marcos

Culture and Climate Change

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the Graduate Student Caucus. Presiding: Michael Verderame, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

1. "Climate, Prophecy, and Green Politics in Shelley," Michael Verderame

2. "Expansion and Restraint in Jonathan Franzen's Freedom," Philip Longo, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

3. "Under Miles of Ice and Heaps of Data: The Climate-Change Subject in American Culture," Stephen Siperstein, Univ. of Oregon

4. "Complex Systems and Global Catastrophe: Networks in David Mitchell's Ghostwritten," Shawn Ballard, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Rethinking Secularism

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Anthropological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Brian T. Edwards, Northwestern Univ.

1. "Heterodoxy and Secularism," Gauri Viswanathan, Columbia Univ.

2. "Secularism, Secularity, and Sexuality: Notes from Postcolonial Middle East," Saba Mahmood, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3. "The Dresser and Histories of the Secular," Michael D. Warner, Yale Univ.

The Faces behind the Data: Humanizing the MLA Report Data on Humanities Doctorate Recipients and Faculty Members by Race and Ethnicity

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 614, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada. Presiding: Deborah A. Miranda, Washington and Lee Univ.

Speakers: Debra K. S. Barker, Univ. of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Thabiti Lewis, Washington State Univ., Vancouver; Amelia María de la Luz Montes, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandan Reddy, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Doug Steward, MLA

This roundtable features scholars of color discussing the report Data on Humanities Doctorate Recipients and Faculty Members by Race and Ethnicity and brainstorming the ways in which data per se can be useful to faculty members of color as they move through graduate school, look for jobs, and then pursue tenure and promotion.

For report, visit www.mla.org/data_humanities.

Trans-transatlantic

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 611, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: William Beatty Warner, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

1. "Atlanticism as Historicism," Elisa Tamarkin, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Frankenstein's Transports: Modernity, Mobility, and the Science of Feeling," Miranda Jane Burgess, Univ. of British Columbia

3. "Sea Tech and Sea Affect: Translating Technical Maritime Language in Eighteenth-Century British Writing," Janet L. Sorensen, Univ. of California, Berkeley

4. "Theorizing the Space of Chinoiserie," Chi-ming Yang, Univ. of Pennsylvania

For abstracts, write to warner@english.ucsb.edu.

Latin American Poetry: New Approaches

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature. Presiding: Michelle A. Clayton, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Poetry as a Performative Genre," Jill Suzanne Kuhnheim, Univ. of Kansas

2. "Elective Affinities: Networks, Affect, and Algorithm," Craig Epplin, Columbia Univ.

3. "How to Be Stupid: A Poetic Guide to Politics and Markets in Contemporary Latin America," Justin Andrew Read, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York

Graphic Narratives Retelling History: Serbia and Bosnia

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures. Presiding: Rossen Djagalov, Yale Univ.

1. "The Nova Dobo Festival of Nonaligned Comics in Belgrade," Lisa Mangum, Independent Publishing Resource Center

2. "How We Survived War, Sanctions, and NATO Bombing, and Then Laughed: Regards from Serbia by Alexandar Zograf," Damjana Mraovic-O'Hare, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Back into Bosnian: Joe Sacco's Safe Area Goražde Returns Home from War," Jessie M. Labov, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

Respondent: Martha B. Kuhlman, Bryant Univ.

For abstracts, visit http://mlaslavicdivision2012.blogspot.com.

Eighteenth-Century Reconfigurations: Redistributing Knowledge

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., University, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature. Presiding: David Washington, Miami Univ., Oxford

1. "Fortune Mongers or Heroic Traders? Representations of the Empire in the Eighteenth-Century English Public Sphere," Nida Sajid, Univ. of Western Ontario

2. "Pneumatology and Rhetoric: Redistributing Knowledge about Mind and Motion," Sara Landreth, Univ. of Ottawa

3. "The Comet of 1680–81: Reconfiguring the Sky," Claire B. Goldstein, Miami Univ., Oxford

4. "The Child's Slave: Representations of Phillis Wheatley in Juvenile Literature," Lucia Hodgson, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

Haiti Studies: Current Debates and New Directions

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Francophone Literatures and Cultures. Presiding: Joëlle F. Vitiello, Macalester Coll.

Speakers: Cecile Accilien, Columbus State Univ.; Myriam J. A. Chancy, Univ. of Cincinnati; Valerie Kaussen, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia; Nick Nesbitt, Princeton Univ.; Joubert Satyre, Univ. of Guelph

Research in Haiti requires a cross-disciplinary apparatus to better understand its cultural, social, and geohistorical significance. Participants in this roundtable will illustrate how these innovative disciplinary approaches and transformations have informed their research.

Pain Studies

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 620, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Disability Studies. Presiding: Susannah B. Mintz, Skidmore Coll.

1. "Reconsidering Pain: What Disability Has to Offer," Dominika Bednarska, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Ernst Junger and the Rediscovery of Pain in the Camera," Derek Hillard, Kansas State Univ.

3. "Toward a Phenomenology of Pain," Elizabeth Anker, Cornell Univ.

4. "Pain, Pain Medication, and the Figure of the Pain Patient," Judy Segal, Univ. of British Columbia

Reading as Orientation

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Leslie Morris, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

1. "Reading as Orientation," Michel Chaouli, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "Reading Surreptitiously: Brecht, Love, and The Lives of Others," Martina Kolb, Penn State Univ., University Park

3. "Reading Time: Oswald Egger's Die ganze Zeit," Peter Alexander Gilgen, Cornell Univ.

African Autobiography and Political Discourse

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on African Literatures. Presiding: Taiwo Adetunji Osinubi, Université de Montréal

1. "Narratives of Personal Destiny and Political Agency: Camara Laye and Ishmael Beah," Felicity Palmer, Clarkson Univ.

2. "Military Politics in Wole Soyinka’s Autobiographies," Adetayo I. Alabi, Univ. of Mississippi

3. "Missions, Modernity, Memoir: Ngũgĩ’s Dreams in a Time of War," Megan Cole Paustian, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

4. "Making Blackness: Autobiography and the South African Township," Megan Jones, Univ. of Stellenbosch

Indigenous Languages and Identities

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 304, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on American Indian Literatures. Presiding: David Lewis Moore, Univ. of Montana

1. "Ojibwe Language in a Western Narrative: Louise Erdrich's Tracks," Judy Bertonazzi, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

2. "The Old Language: Pedagogy, Indigenous Languages, and Literature," Stephanie J. Fitzgerald, Univ. of Kansas

3. "American Identities Entwined: The Translation of Lennon's Image into Dakota and Ojibwe," Margaret A. Noori, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Dynamic Learning for Advanced Proficiency

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics. Presiding: Christina Czajkoski, Defense Language Inst.

1. "Reflections on Dynamic Learning, Curricular Thinking, and Advanced Proficiency," Heidi Byrnes, Georgetown Univ.

2. "Developing Literary Reading Skills in the Second Language: A Strategy-Oriented Approach," Per Urlaub, Univ. of Texas, Austin

3. "Advancing Students' Pragmatic Skills through the Study-Abroad Experience," Linda McManness, Baylor Univ.

For abstracts, write to virginia.m.scott@vanderbilt.edu.

Memory and Nostalgia in Anglo-Saxon England

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 612, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Old English Language and Literature. Presiding: Stacy S. Klein, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "The Time Is Out of Joint: The Ethopoetic Voice and Anglo-Saxon Elegiac Aesthetics," Matthew T. Hussey, Simon Fraser Univ.

2. "Old English Poetic Repetition in Anglo-Saxon Memories of Mind and Media," Michael Norris, Univ. of Notre Dame

3. "Re-membering the Old Testament as Political Theology: The Anglo-Saxon Exodus," Samantha Zacher, Cornell Univ.

Geoffrey Hill

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 309, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Religion. Presiding: James Hiester Najarian, Boston Coll.

1. "'Common Equivocation' in Geoffrey Hill," Kevin John Hart, Univ. of Virginia

2. "The Logic of Sacrifice in Geoffrey Hill," William A. Johnsen, Michigan State Univ.

3. "The Mystery of Geoffrey Hill," Henry Michael Weinfield, Univ. of Notre Dame

Sex Ed

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Gay Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Sharon Patricia Holland, Duke Univ.

1. "Sexual Pedagogies: Early Modern and Postmodern," Valerie J. Traub, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. "'Keep Straight!': VD, Sex Ed, and Protoheterosexuality," Laura Doan, Univ. of Manchester

3. "About Time: Simultaneous Orgasm and Sexual Normalcy," Annamarie Jagose, Univ. of Sydney

Academically Adrift? Language, Literature, and Learning in the Small College English Department

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 606, WSCC

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Research. Presiding: Mark C. Long, Keene State Coll.

1. "Steering a Course for High Student Engagement: A Response to Academically Adrift," Suzanne Parker Keen, Washington and Lee Univ.

2. "Anchoring Our Idealism: Institutional Culture and the Challenges of Effective Course Design at the Small College," Paul Hanstedt, Roanoke Coll.

3. "Fallacies and Misplaced Concreteness: Teaching and Student Learning in a Public Liberal Arts College," Mark C. Long

Animal Studies, Ecocriticism, and Modern Italy

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Italian Literature. Presiding: John P. Welle, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "Kafka and Conversing Creatures in Italy: Interrogating the Human-Animal Boundary," Saskia Ziolkowski, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Animality and Hybridization in Paolo Volponi's Corporale and Il pianeta irritabile," Daniele Fioretti, Miami Univ., Oxford

3. "The Suffering Animal: Humans, Animals, and Ethics in Primo Levi," Damiano Benvegnù, Univ. of Notre Dame

4. "Encaging with Words: Language and the Animal Question in Current Italian Philosophy," Matteo Gilebbi, Duke Univ.

The Medieval Francophone Mediterranean

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on French Medieval Language and Literature. Presiding: Sharon A. Kinoshita, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

1. "Mediterranean Moxy: Women on the Water in Old French Literature," Sandra L. Evans, Univ. of Puget Sound

2. "Ancient History in the Neapolitan Court of Robert of Anjou," Marilynn R. Desmond, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York

3. "After the Fall (of Acre): Francophone Historiography in and about the Mediterranean," David Joseph Wrisley, American Univ. of Beirut

Intermediality and Contemporary Cultural Production in Spain

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. Presiding: Susan Martin-Márquez, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

1. "Hybrid Story Spaces: Redefining the Critical Enterprise in Twenty-First-Century Hispanic Literature," Christine Henseler, Union Coll., NY

2. "Intermedial Almodóvar: What We Can Learn from Bad Education (2004)," Samuel Amago, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

3. "Postpoetics: Sampling and Intermediality in Agustín Fernández Mallo's El hacedor (de Borges), Remake," Ignacio Infante, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Catalans in the Americas: Transatlantic Perspectives

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Seneca, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Ashley Puig Herz, Cornell Univ.

1. "The Exile as Disinherited: Pere Calders in Mexico," Jennifer Duprey, Rutgers Univ., Newark

2. "Reimagining Latin America: Catalan Writers in Mexico," Marcela Junguito, Stanford Univ.

3. "La qüestió de Cuba: Catalonia and the Antilles at the Threshold of Autonomy," José M. Rodríguez García, Duke Univ.

Respondent: Francisco Fernández de Alba, Wheaton Coll., MA

"In a Joint and Corporate Voice": Genealogies of the Corporate Form

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 619, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Shakespeare. Presiding: Mary L. Floyd-Wilson, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1. "Corporation beyond Incorporation: Shakespeare and Company," Henry S. Turner, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "Beyond Kantorowicz," David J. Baker, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Respondent: Laurie Shannon, Northwestern Univ.

Digital Material

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Charles M. Tung, Seattle Univ.; Benjamin Widiss, Princeton Univ.

Speakers: Paul Benzon, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Cara Elisabeth Ogburn, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Charles M. Tung; Benjamin Widiss; Zachary Zimmer, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

Is there gravity in digital worlds? Moving beyond both lamentations and celebrations of the putatively free-floating informatic empyrean, this roundtable will explore the ways in which representations in myriad digital platforms--verbal, visual, musical, cinematic--might bear the weight of materiality, presence, and history and the ways in which bodies--both human and hardware--might be recruited for or implicated in the effort.

For abstracts, write to bwidiss@princeton.edu.

Servitude in the Contemporary Transnational Literary Imaginary

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 307, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: William Malcuit, Univ. of Wisconsin Colls., Washington County; Ann Mattis, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

1. "'Servants Will Talk': Imperial Domesticity in Wide Sargasso Sea," Mary E. Wilson, Christopher Newport Univ.

2. "My Servant, Myself: The Domestic Servant in Recent Anglophone Indian Fiction," Rajender Kaur, William Paterson Univ.

3. "Reading Nannies' Diaries: Gentrified Care Work and Transnational Dreams in Contemporary American Women's Fiction," Ann Mattis

Reading Affect in Twentieth-Century Literature

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 616, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Nishant Shahani, Washington State Univ., Pullman

1. "The Moods of a Woman of That Sort: Disgust and Charity in the Censorship of Ulysses," Christopher Walker, Middle Tennessee State Univ.

2. "Queer Affect and the Politics of Reparative Retrospection," Nishant Shahani

3. "Affect and Terror: Lessons from the Sixties," Patricia Stuelke, Boston Univ.

For papers, visit affective-methodologies.blogspot.com.

More Recent Morrison

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 308, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Rachael Barnett, Univ. of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

1. "The (Neo–)Slave Narrative in Black and White: Toni Morrison's Reenvisioning of Masculinity in A Mercy," Howard Melton II, North Carolina State Univ.

2. "Tangles of Pathology: Constitutional Privacy, the Moynihan Report, and the Gothic Domestic in Toni Morrison's Paradise," Eden Osucha, Bates Coll.

3. "Colonial Roots of a National Tree: American Slavery in Toni Morrison's A Mercy," Rachael Barnett

For abstracts, write to rbarnett@uwsp.edu.

Katherine Mansfield and Modernist Form

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Jay Dickson, Reed Coll.

1. "Flirtation and Literary Form in Mansfield," Rishona Elena Zimring, Lewis and Clark Coll.

2. "Mansfield's Uncontained Selves: Narrative Spaces for New Subjectivities," Nancy Gray, Coll. of William and Mary

3. "Mansfield's Quarrel with Literary Impressionism," Sydney Janet Kaplan, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Between Biography and Literary Criticism: Divided Attentions or Productive Tensions?

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 305, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Suzanne Jill Levine, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

1. "Biography and Poesis: Pound and H.D. as Love Poets," Jeanne Diane Heuving, Univ. of Washington, Bothell

2. "Lives, Texts, and Sex," Allen Hibbard, Middle Tennessee State Univ.

3. "Paradoxa Biographica: Biography and Narrative," Enrico Santi, Univ. of Kentucky

Respondent: Helane Levine-Keating, Pace Univ., New York

For abstracts, write to sjlevine@spanport.ucsb.edu.

Faces, Masks, Maps: World Literature and the Russo-Japanese War

Sunday, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Steven Lee, Univ. of California, Berkeley

1. "The Masked Boy as Geisha: The Rise of Japonisme in Russian Decadence," Katy Sosnak, Univ. of California, Berkeley

2. "Behind the Japanese Smile: Natsume Sōseki's Kusamakura and Anglo-American Depth Psychology," Andrew Way Leong, Northwestern Univ.

3. "Hypnotic Faces and Counterfeit Maps: The Political Economy of Vision and Diplomacy in Zeng Pu's Flowers in a Sea of Retribution," Roy Chan, Coll. of William and Mary

Respondent: Steven Lee

For abstracts, visit www.wm.edu/as/modernlanguages/faculty/chinese/chan_r.php.

Ethics and Literary Experience

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 617, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the Victorian Period. Presiding: Richard Menke, Univ. of Georgia

1. "Victorian Sources of the Empathy-Altruism Relation," Suzanne Parker Keen, Washington and Lee Univ.

2. "Narrative Empathy and Empathic Bias," Mary-Catherine Harrison, Univ. of Detroit Mercy

3. "'Dark like Me': Ethics and Black Erfahrung in Wilkie Collins," Lauren M. E. Goodlad, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

Romantic Number(s): Body, Individuality, Automaton, Multitude

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 616, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period. Presiding: Maureen Noelle McLane, New York Univ.

1. "Docile Numbers and Stubborn Bodies: Population and the Problem of Multitude," Ron Broglio, Arizona State Univ.

2. "Ranking and Romantic Lyric," Bo Earle, Univ. of British Columbia

3. "Lyric Mindedness and the 'Automaton Poet' in Coleridge and Scott," John Savarese, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

Poetry, Poetics, Politics in the Modern Arab World

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Anthony Alessandrini, Kingsborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

1. "Arabic Poetry: A Genealogy of Dissent," Nouri Gana, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

2. "Silence and Slow Time: The Politics of Poetic Utterance," David C. Lloyd, Univ. of Southern California

3. "Tarab and the Revolutionary Moment," Elliott Colla, Georgetown Univ.

4. "Tunisia and the Emergence of Poetic Democratic Humanism," Ronald Judy, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Practices of Creolization in Southeast Asian Sinophone Culture

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Cedar, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Tzu-Hui Celina Hung, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

1. "Sino-Thai Literature: Assimilation, Biculturalism, Translingual Creolization," Brian C. Bernards, Univ. of Southern California

2. "Singlish and the Sinophone: Nonstandard (Chinese/English) in Recent Singaporean Cinema," Alison Groppe, Univ. of Oregon

3. "Sliding between Chinese and Filipino: Postcolonial Tsinoy Mestizoness in the Mano Po Films," Tzu-Hui Celina Hung

Respondent: Alison Groppe

For abstracts, write to celinahung@gmail.com.

Unpredictable Sympathies

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 304, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Naomi Greyser, Univ. of Iowa

1. "Sound and Separateness: The Hindu Widow's Cries in Early-Nineteenth-Century United States Print Culture," Toni Wall Jaudon, Ithaca Coll.

2. "Sympathy's Urban Sublime: Margaret Fuller, Lydia Maria Child, and Involuntary Encounter," Travis M. Foster, Coll. of Wooster

3. "A Plotting Maiden and a Traitor: Risking Intimacy to Win Distance in Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins's Life among the Piutes (1883)," Naomi Greyser

New Paths of Flânerie: Crossings of Gender and Space and the Nineteenth-Century French Flâneur/Flâneuse

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Aspen, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Heidi Megan Brevik-Zender, Univ. of California, Riverside

1. "Fashion and Fractured Flânerie in Guy de Maupassant's Bel-Ami," Heidi Megan Brevik-Zender

2. "On the Misfortunes of Child Flaneurs in French Nineteenth-Century Children's Books," Pauline de Tholozany, Gettysburg Coll.

3. "Perpendicular Flâneries: Bourgeois Women, Spectatorship, and the Facades of Haussmann's Paris," Vesna Rodic, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Respondent: Catherine M. J. Nesci, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Refashioning the Poetics of "Post"; or, How to Imagine beyond Postmodernism

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 620, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Carmen Derkson, Univ. of Calgary

1. "The Materiality of Sincerity: Postmodernity's Embodiments," Hillary Gravendyk, Pomona Coll.

2. "Somatic Geographies: Toward a Feminist Poetics of Regional Verse," Aimee Allard, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

3. "The Postfeminism of the Long Poem," Julia Bloch, Bard Coll., CA

4. "Reparative Turns in Lyric Place Practice," Carmen Derkson

For abstracts and papers, write to caderkso@ucalgary.ca.

New Media Narratives and Old Prose Fiction

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 310, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Prose Fiction. Presiding: Amy J. Elias, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

1. "New Media: Its Use and Abuse for Literature and for Life," Joseph Paul Tabbi, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

2. "Contrasts and Convergences of Electronic Literature," Dene M. Grigar, Washington State Univ., Vancouver

3. "Computing Language and Poetry," Nick Montfort, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

Common First-Year Readings and Themes: Theory, Practice, Problems, Promise

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 608, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Writing. Presiding: Dale Larson, Grays Harbor Coll., WA

1. "The Common Book Experience, Uncommon Curricular Constituencies, and Academic Freedom in the First Year," K. J. Peters, Loyola Marymount Univ.

2. "When Everyone Reads or Misreads the Same Book: Campus Readers and Common Readers," Harvey Michael Teres, Syracuse Univ.

3. "Sustainability and the Common 'Critical' Gesture: Teaching a Theme or Prescribing a Point of View," Peter Michael Huk, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

4. "'Not As Hard As You Think': Interdisciplinary Service Learning and Required English," Samantha Riley, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Northwest Poetry and Poetics

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 606, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Steven Gould Axelrod, Univ. of California, Riverside

1. "Northwest Poetry and Poetry Northwest," David Wagoner, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

2. "Poetic Networks and Public Spheres," Paul A. Jaussen, Case Western Reserve Univ.

3. "Invisible Seattle: Red Sky Poetry Theater Remembered," Mark Svenvold, Seton Hall Univ.

Respondent: Jeffrey Gray, Seton Hall Univ.

New Directions in Oceanic Studies

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 306, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Hester Blum, Penn State Univ., University Park; Lenora Warren, New York Univ.

1. "Exploring Maritime Book Histories," Adriana Craciun, Univ. of California, Riverside

2. "Insurrection at Sea: Violence, the Slave Trade, and the Rhetoric of Abolition," Lenora Warren

3. "The Rhetoric of Naval Combat in Elizabethan Prose," Mary Fuller, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

4. "The United States at the Ends of the Earth," Hester Blum

Self-Narrating Lives: Genre-Bending Autobiographical Works

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 611, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Johanna Drucker, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Speakers: Maria Faini, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Anna Gibbs, Univ. of Western Sydney; William Kuskin, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Vanessa Place, Les Figues Press; Christine Wertheim, California Inst. of the Arts

This session explores the complexities of self-narration across media and formats with particular emphasis on those that blur genre lines. Autobiographical artists' books, graphic novels are often highly self-reflexive, and their metacharacter as books about books, or subversions of norms, makes them sites of citation and parody in which formal mimicry and content play with readers' expectations.

After the Jacobites

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 613, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Steven L. Newman, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

1. "Robert Burns's Infidelity," Sean Patrick Barry, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. "'A Capital Old Song': Hogg's Jacobite Songs and the Value of Traditional Mobility," Steven L. Newman

3. "Victorian Pretenders: Oliphant, Stevenson, and the Fugitives of the '45," Devin Griffiths, Univ. of Pennsylvania

For abstracts, write to sean.barry@rutgers.edu.

Close Playing: Literary Methods and Video Game Studies

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., University, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Mark L. Sample, George Mason Univ.

Speakers: Edmond Chang, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Steven E. Jones, Loyola Univ., Chicago; Jason C. Rhody, National Eudowment for the Humanities; Anastasia Salter, Univ. of Baltimore; Timothy Welsh, Loyola Univ., New Orleans; Zach Whalen, Univ. of Mary Washington

This roundtable moves beyond the games-versus-stories dichotomy to explore the full range of possible literary approaches to video games. These approaches include the theoretical and methodological contributions of reception studies, reader-response theory, narrative theory, critical race and gender theory, disability studies, and textual scholarship.

For abstracts, visit www.samplereality.com/mla12.

Cultural Consumption, Lifestyle, and Values

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Virginia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Eighteenth- and Early-Nineteenth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Karin Anneliese Wurst, Michigan State Univ.

1. "Consuming Lifestyle: Fouque's German History of Sartorial and Cultural Fashions," Angela C. D. Borchert, Univ. of Western Ontario

2. "A Culture of Sisterhood in Das Leben der Hochgräfin Gritta von Rattenzuhausbeiuns," Rebecca Steele, Univ. of Wyoming

Textual Remediation in the Digital Age

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 307, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research. Presiding: Andrew M. Stauffer, Univ. of Virginia

Speakers: Mark Algee-Hewitt, McGill Univ.; Alison Booth, Univ. of Virginia; Amanda Gailey, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln; Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

Roundtable on the theoretical, practical, and institutional issues surrounding the transformation of print-era texts into digital forms for scholarly use. What forms of editing need to be done, and by whom? What new research questions are becoming possible? How will the global digital library change professional communication? What is the future of the academic research library? How can we make sustainable digital textual resources for literary studies?

Creative Nonfiction in a Global Frame

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbia, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Nonfiction Prose Studies, Excluding Biography and Autobiography. Presiding: Amardeep Singh, Lehigh Univ.

1. "Making the Stranger Strange in Burma," Madelyn Detloff, Miami Univ., Oxford

2. "Radical Form as Political Consciousness: Allen Ginsberg’s Indian Journals," Susan E. Lewak, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

3. "This Novel Is Not a Novel: Memoir, Testimony, and Representation in A Sunday at the Pool in Kigali," Jennifer Yusin, Drexel Univ.

4. "Literary Nonfiction from Contemporary India: More Than Just a (Trans)National Longing for Form?" Avishek Ganguly, Rhode Island School of Design

The National Debt and Logics of American Realism

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 303, WSCC

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Donald E. Pease, Dartmouth Coll.

1. "Realism's International Debts," Wai Chee Dimock, Yale Univ.

2. "Political Romances and the Problem of Realism: The Genre Question in Political Theory," George Shulman, New York Univ.

3. "Volatility, Economic and Literary," John Brenkman, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York

Respondent: Donald E. Pease

Suspension of the Will in Early Modern England

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 309, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr., Penn State Univ., University Park

1. "Incapacitated Will," Rebecca Lemon, Univ. of Southern California

2. "Impersonal Will," Bradin Cormack, Univ. of Chicago

3. "Will, Sleep, and the Human," Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr.

Crisis and Continuity: The Avant-Garde in Its Time

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Jefferson, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Mary Ann Caws, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

1. "The Little Review: Avant-Garde Rupture and Its Discontents," Alan Golding, Univ. of Louisville

2. "Benjamin Fondane’s Faith in History," Cosana Eram, Stanford Univ.

3. "Modern Poetic Directions: Czech Surrealism and Socialist Realism," Vaclav Paris, Univ. of Pennsylvania

4. "Cunningham and Duchamp: Images of Time in Space," Carrie Jaurès Noland, Univ. of California, Irvine

Jean Bodin and Renaissance Demonology

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna C, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Virginia Krause, Brown Univ.

1. "Saving Appearances and Burning Witches: Montaigne, Bodin, and Copernicus," Eric MacPhail, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

2. "Deformity, Malevolence, and the Witch Scare in Early Modern Culture," Rinku Chatterjee, Syracuse Univ.

3. "The Reception of Johann Weyer in 'De la démonomanie des sorciers,'" Christian Martin, Stonehill Coll.

4. "Into the Night: Demonology's Dark Truth," Virginia Krause

Pale Fire at Fifty

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 305, WSCC

Program arranged by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society. Presiding: James Ramey, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Cuajimalpa

1. "Pale Fire and Doctor Zhivago: A Case of Intertextual Envy," Catharine Theimer Nepomnyashchy, Barnard Coll.

2. "Relocking the Closet Door: Queer Theory versus the Text of Pale Fire," Daniel Aureliano Newman, Univ. of Toronto

3. "Annotating Pale Fire: An Unbounded Education," Matthew S. Roth, Messiah Coll.

For abstracts, visit web.utk.edu/~sblackwe/pf50.htm.

Affecting Affect Theory

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 615, WSCC

A special session. Presiding: Lauren Berlant, Univ. of Chicago

Speakers: Ann L. Cvetkovich, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Neville W. Hoad, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Heather K. Love, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Tavia Nyong'o, New York Univ.

Continuing the work of the Public Feelings project, this roundtable seeks to map affect studies now but not to stabilize the area's foundations. Participants will choose a research problem from a collectively generated list related to the affective components of aesthetics, embodiment, pedagogy, and politics to assess directions for research and experiment. The panelists and audience members will then brainstorm ways to expand the archive of questions and agendas.

For a list of questions for roundtable participants (and the potential interlocutors from the audience), visit www.supervalentthought.com.

What Has Been Lost? Three Interpretations of the Current State of Spanish Cinema

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Greenwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Patricia M. Keller, Cornell Univ.

1. "Monumental Legacies: The Mask of Loss in Alex de la Iglesia's Balada triste de trompeta," Patricia M. Keller

2. "Alex de la Iglesia como intelectual orgánico: La reconfiguración de las políticas del conocimiento y las industrias culturales en la España contemporánea," Luis Martin-Cabrera, Univ. of California, San Diego

3. "Temporalidad, historia, y el sujeto político en el cine español contemporáneo," Cristina Moreiras-Menor, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

For abstracts, write to pkeller@cornell.edu.

Modern and Premodern Forms in August Strindberg

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ravenna A and B, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Ann-Charlotte Gavel Adams, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

1. "Form and History in Miss Julie," Leonardo Lisi, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD

2. "The Prison and the Poorhouse: Dance of Death's Economics of Depletion," Anna W. Stenport, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

3. "Modernity’s Urban Aesthetic and the Protomodernist Miniature: Alone," Alexandra Borg, Uppsala Univ.

For abstracts, write to leonardo.lisi@jhu.edu.

Remediating Eighteenth-Century Authorship

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Willow A, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Sören Hammerschmidt, Ghent Univ.

1. "'Acting Plays and Reading Plays': Intermediation and Fielding’s The Author’s Farce and the Pleasures of the Town," Mark Vareschi, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio

2. "The Pamela Franchise," Martha A. Woodmansee, Case Western Reserve Univ.

3. "Authorship and the Anthology in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Germany," Bryn Savage, Yale Univ.

4. "Authors Unformed: Reading 'Beauties' in the Eighteenth Century," Daniel Cook, Univ. of Bristol

Pushing the Boundaries of Testimonio: Theory and Practice in the Twenty-First Century

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Redwood, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Louise A. Detwiler, Salisbury Univ.

1. "Novel Testimonio Landscapes," Janis Breckenridge, Whitman Coll.; Louise A. Detwiler

2. "Hiding the Camera in Miguel Littin's Acta General de Chile," David William Foster, Arizona State Univ.

3. "Centrifugal and Centripetal Forces in Testimonial Studies," Kimberly Nance, Illinois State Univ.

Haunted Travel Writings: Journeys to the East

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Issaquah, Sheraton

A special session. Presiding: Melissa Edmundson Makala, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia; Pei-Ju Wu, National Chung Hsing Univ.

1. "The Gothic Traveler: Lafcadio Hearn and Angela Carter in Japan," Mary Goodwin, National Taiwan Normal Univ.

2. "Allegorical Journey into a Haunted China: Gao Xingjian's Artistic Spaces," Pei-Ju Wu

3. "Unsettled Ghosts in Alice Perrin's Anglo-India," Melissa Edmundson Makala

For abstracts, visit www.cosmopolitan-mona.blogspot.com.

Multiethnic Literatures and Laws

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 604, WSCC

Program arranged by MELUS: The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. Presiding: Wenxin Li, Suffolk County Community Coll., Ammerman Campus, NY

1. "Your Laws, Our Land: Legal Representations in Stephen Graham Jones's The Bird Is Gone," John Blair Gamber, Columbia Univ.

2. "Chinese Exclusion Act and the Early Chinese American Strategies of Resistance," Yuan Shu, Texas Tech Univ.

3. "'I'm Out and He's In': Nativist Discourse in American Expressionist Drama," Sunny Stalter, Auburn Univ., Auburn

Respondent: Wenying Xu, Florida Atlantic Univ.

Authors and Characters, Authors as Characters

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ballard, Sheraton

Program arranged by the Division on Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. Presiding: Christian Robert Moevs, Univ. of Notre Dame

1. "Reflections on Ovid and Ovidian Characters: From the Origins to Dante," Julie Van Peteghem, Columbia Univ.

2. "Friendships Revisited: Dante and the Donati," Elizabeth A. Coggeshall, Stanford Univ.

3. "Dante as Tityrus: Imitation and Innovation in the Poetic Correspondence between Dante and Giovanni del Virgilio," Beatrice Priest, Univ. of Cambridge

Vanishing Acts: Performance and the Real

Sunday, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 618, WSCC

Program arranged by the American Theatre and Drama Society. Presiding: Peter Reed, Univ. of Mississippi

1. "Retooling the Kitchen Sink in Realism: Representing Domesticity and Food after 1963," Dorothy Chansky, Texas Tech Univ.

2. "The Text of Absence," Odai Johnson, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

3. "The Hustle of Theater: Player and Played in Suzan-Lori Parks's Topdog/Underdog," Michael LeMahieu, Clemson Univ.

4. "Reappearing Acts: The Enactment of Community Place and Memory in the Site-Specific Performance Re-membering Harmony," Nadja Masura, Virtual Performance Collective

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